Zone 7 - What can I start doing now?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Ravenlost, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It's too wet to get out in my new garden plot and start building my raised beds, but I'm itching to do something. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Jack in VA

    Jack in VA Well-Known Member

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    Start seeds indoors.
     

  3. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    LOL...maybe I should have said I'm itching to do something other than bring in firewood, muck stalls and feed horses! No time for long hot baths and good books (I try to read for a few minutes in bed every night and have been reading the same book since Christmas).

    I want to plant something in the ground!
     
  4. MsPacMan

    MsPacMan Well-Known Member

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    I'm in Zone 7 too, and know what you mean.


    I've been starting seeds indoors. Also, two weeks ago when it was pretty spring weather, I went out and dug a new garden bed. Of course, it's too wet to do that right now.


    Also, I've been thumbing through seed catalogs, and ordering supplies (eg, floating row cover) so that when the weather improves, I'll be ready.
     
  5. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Why don't you plant some mixed salad greens in a tub that can be brought inside if frost threatens? I know exactly what you mean about wanting to plant something! I can hardly wait to get moved and start my garden. I can easily spend all day, every day piddling in my garden and I don't HAVE one right now.
     
  6. cathyharrell

    cathyharrell Well-Known Member

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    I have 80 peppers and tomatoes planted in different containers, most in a little plastic Jiffy greenhouse type thing that I got free in the mail last year, in my room in front of an east window. Sure will be glad when warm weather gets here. I am a little worried about the six pet wild turkeys getting in my garden. They sure can fly high.
     
  7. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    DH built a nice greenhouse last year. It is 12 x 12 with lots of shelves. The cole crops are coming up. The floating row covers are very useful; used them last couple of years. Maybe sharpen your gardening tools, locate seeds you want to plant, make row markers.
     
  8. rkintn

    rkintn mean people suck

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    Plant seeds to keep indoors in cold weather! I am in zone 7 and yesterday and today were just gorgeous! I used a couple of those jiffy greenhouse things and filled up 97 spots today! I can't wait til they start sproutin'!
     
  9. 3girls

    3girls Well-Known Member

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    Plant some tall posts in some nice ground. Dig in a little horse manure down deep. Cover with some dirt (or mud as the case may be). Plant sweet peas right into the mud about 1 1/2" apart between the posts, then add chicken wire between the posts.

    One lady in Maine (seen on MSL) builds her trellises 18" apart and 7' tall. She makes lots of them. She then sells the flowers. She picks each plant every other day. She experiments from year to year with varieties. She now has a reputation and never has any trouble selling out.

    Washington's birthday is supposed to be when you plant peas. Cole crops can be started indoors now and set out in March in your climate. I'm in PA so our last frost is April 15. I will do all the above about one month after you.

    Happy planting.

    PS ATT'N I found the notes I had taken. Please make the rows 3' apart. They create a sort of miniclimate in there. She uses Mason jars in old wood soda crates to pick into. I apologize for the wrong info.
     
  10. ajaxlucy

    ajaxlucy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm zone 5, but I couldn't stand it anymore, so I went out and planted some spinach seeds today. It's supposed to snow later this week but I don't care. Maybe they'll grow.
     
  11. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My potting shed is finally going to be built Friday. Immediately after that I can start laying out my raised beds, planning where I want things to go, etc. I am doing things differently...and more extensively...than in the past. I am going to start tomato and pepper seed indoors...get started on some sweet potato slips and plan to plant potatos and green peas in a couple weeks.
     
  12. shorty'smom

    shorty'smom Well-Known Member

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    I'm in zone 7 too. I can't till my garden because it's solid mud. I usually plant my peas in Feb or early march. They germinate best if the get wet and freeze first. They can come up and be growing even if it snows. They will die back a little bit, but they won't be killed by a frost or even snow. I plant potatoes, broccoli, cabbage, carrots and onion sets in March. Last year I planted the cabbage, broccoli and carrots in Feb when I did the peas. The rain and freezing seemed to be good for them too. I seeded them directly into the garden. To keep the seed in place until it comes up I get a really cheap brand of toilet tissue. Roll the tissue out in the garden row. (hold it down with a little soil if it is windy) Place the seeds on the tissue at the desired planting distance. Fold the tissue over the seeds and cover the tissue with soil to the correct depth. You can do this for all kinds of tiny seeds. The tissue will hold the seeds and keep them from washing away. It will dissolve when it gets wet, but will stay in the viciity of the seed and retain a bit of moisture to help the seedling along in those first crucial hours of growth.

    Since we've got nothing but mud so far this year, I've threatened to go out and poke holes with a stick in the mud and plant peas anyway. I did my bush beans that way last year.
     
  13. Sylvia

    Sylvia Well-Known Member

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  14. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    How is it?

    I'm planting cabbages tomorrow. I've got to stop at Lowe's in the morning on the way to the new place and I'm going to get a six pack of cabbage plants. I cannot wait anymore either.

    There were three metal door frames piled in the edge of the woods. I've dragged (drug? :confused: ) them out and filled them with the wonderful "sandy-loam-compost" that I dug out of the chicken pen that has been empty for 4 years. I got about 12 inches down and was able to get enough to fill all three door frames. They've made terrific raised beds.
     
  15. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It's terrific! It's 8x12 and feels so roomy inside. Of course, it's empty right now. Now we can build the chicken coop onto the back of it, build the chicken run down the back sides of the garden and I can get more chickens and start building my raised beds.

    SIGH...of course, it needs to stop raining first. :(