Zone 5 Fruit & Berry ideas

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Cat, Jan 8, 2008.

  1. Cat

    Cat Well-Known Member

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    I'm wanting ideas on things we can plant in zone 5 for fresh fruits and berries. I've already learned that we can grow peaches somewhat successfully! (A major surprise!) and my Grandpa used to have an apricot tree on his place so I know those can be grown successfully. I am also aware that we can grow strawberries and mulberries but I'm wanting to find others that can be grown here for berries and fruit. I think I'm going to try to start an orchard of sorts so that we can get some fresh fruit and such. (We already have one little mulberry tree that hasn't done too well due to the drought...although this last year I knew (remembered) to go look when I started noticing purple bird poo all over!)

    My Grandma's both had little berry plants that had bright purple berries on them when I was young and I haven't a clue as to what they were but they were incredibly tasty. I'd like to get some of those planted, too. I can't decide if I think they're a currant or what. Schwarzenberry is what my aunt called them, which would be a black berry, right? I don't think they were black berries.
     
  2. Callieslamb

    Callieslamb Well-Known Member

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    I had red raspberry - fall bearing. I cut the canes to the ground after they died covered the roots and waited for spring. I also had black raspberries, but they are a bit more work because the canes have to be overwintered successfully to get a crop. You might also be able to do blueberries if you are willing to help the soil along. I would think you would be too cold for American blackberries unless you can find a variety developed for your climate. You can also grow grapes and strawberries.

    There are many other berries that you should be able to grow successfully.
     

  3. nandmsmom

    nandmsmom Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm zone 6 here, but I think it's about the same. Between my dad and I we have blueberries, raspberries, blackberries and strawberries(these need to be ripped out and restarted). We also have apple trees and are looking at peach trees and pear trees. I'd like to get some grapes, but that will be in a while. I think we can do most anything but citrus. Oh, almost forgot, we are going to try cranberry bushes this year too.
     
  4. COSunflower

    COSunflower Country Girl Supporter

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    I've been growing thornless raspberries for years. I also grow strawberries and the neighbor has a peach tree that bears wonderfully!!! Other neighbors have plums and apricots. All trees have been here since I've lived on the street - 35 years - so I don't know the varieties.
     
  5. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Hi, I'm apparently a little further south in Kansas than you and am in zone 6.

    Stark Bros. Nursery in Louisiana, Missouri has a great catalog. I used to live near there in 1968 and 1969 and the weather is quite similar only much more humid. What would grow there should also grow well for you.

    Here in Reno county there are several apple orchards, one of which also has peaches. Sandhill plums could almost be yours for the asking as farmers spray them to kill them off. They make good jam and jelly, especially if you are willing to spray or use other means to keep the insect damage in check.

    Currents do well. Chokecherries do well although they are somewhat controversial. Blueberries require an acid soil which we tend not to have.

    Look at all of the varieties offered and the forecast harvest dates and you will find that you can be picking some sort of fruit or berry most of the summer and fall.

    Oh, don't forget grapes. I think Kansas used to be third in the nation for grape production before prohibition came into affect.
     
  6. Cat

    Cat Well-Known Member

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    My friend in SC said we'd grow grapes real well here. My Grandma tried at one time but I don't know what ever came of it. She lived west of me, though, in the sandhills, so that could have been part of the problem.

    I'm also a sucker for strawberries! Years ago we had a HUGE patch, then Grandma moved up here and Mom dug some up for her and moved the others near the house and every one of them died! Now I can't get a stand to grow for the life of me. They do well for awhile but then I kill it somehow. I get to where I do things H/A'd for awhile and that's all it takes!

    I'd LOVE a peach tree! We have a cherry tree, too, but it has done about as well as the mulberry tree. Oh, and we do have some sandhill plums planted but they've not produced fruit. A friend has a huge stand of them. I actually prefer the fruit over the jelly although we haven't had either one in ages!
     
  7. lunagardens

    lunagardens Well-Known Member

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    I second the great selection from Stark bros. I just placed our order for peach, apple, & plum trees. We also ordered the northerner special of 3 blueberry varieties and a few concord grapes. Total price for order?
    $128.00!!! thats a savings of around $90 plus we get free Asiatic lily bulbs.
    I suggest getting the catalog mailed to you.Lots of great information showing what fruits will go in your zone the best and the staff were helpful answering my lot of questions on planting, spacing, and such.
    There is a $5 coupon and other discounts worth utilizing. We looked over the "bumper crop" insert which is where we order majority of ours. The concords were in there for $3.49 a piece. The trees we ordered were 50% off and the blueberries were the only non sale item we went for.
    Worth ordering the catalog for the coupons and great selection to mull around while making your choice of what to plant.
    Just my opinion- have never ordered from them before but our extension office guy said he was happy with his dealing with them.
    ~T
     
  8. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In my zone 5 garden I have plums, apples, cherries, blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, gooseberries, blueberries, aronia berries, wild elderberries....and probably some more by spring! ;] The peaches/nectarines can't take an occasional very cold winter and die it seems.
     
  9. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    My area is definitely the sandhills (Hutchinson).

    Perhaps they are winter killing from not being mulched? I had good results until I divorced and the ex didn't water them at all before I got the house back.

    We are of like mind for eating the plums fresh rather than jellied.

    You mentioned cherries--especially pie or tart cherries do well in Kansas.

    The softer fruits don't do as well as apples as they tend to bloom too early and get frost damage. I have seen pears growing not far from here and they seemed to do okay.

    When ordering any trees pay specific attention to cold hardiness and harvest dates. After all, why harvest if the fruit has been ruined by freezing temperatures? You've had good replies and should do well.
     
  10. Bob8hs

    Bob8hs New Member

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    I know I'm late but I just saw your post. If you are still interested I have Schwarzenberry seeds I'm willing to share. They were given to me by a friend from western Kansas. They are Yummy.

    --Bob


     
  11. 7thswan

    7thswan Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi. I'm in zone 5. Have Dannason and Stanley plums. Red Haven peaches and one I forgot. Bing cherries,Metamorcy cherries and Queen Ann. 2 unknown cherries from my Grandparents house. 5 Apples and Kieffer Pears.Mulberrys and Hazelnuts. 3 kinds of Grapes, Red and Yellow Raspberries. Strawberries, and 3 kinds of Blueberries. Saskatoon Blueberry(little tiny stick). Had ordered and planted 2 Hardy Almond trees- one turned out to be a Mulberry and one is a Peach. Should have kept the receipt. Also Have a Hedge of Rugosa Roses that get beautiful Hips.Black Walnuts, that I don't use tho.
     
  12. wally

    wally Well-Known Member

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    Iam in Riley county and have apple,peach,plum,apricot,pear,cherry and nectarin trees and grow blackberry and strawberry. I tried raspberry and was a total loss three years in a row..this spring I planted 7 differene types of nut trees so cant tell yet if any will be alive next spring..if you plant apricots the local farmers tell me you can expect a crop 1 year out of five..been here 11 years and have had 2 crops.wally
     
  13. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Don't know if you're in 5a or 5b, but there's a goodly difference between zones 5 and 6 when growing fruit.

    I'd recommend a nursery that grows in Zone 4 or even Zone 3. We do have peaches here, but we fight the weather constantly. I think we're better prepared for next season, though, as we've figured out how to deal with Peach Leaf Curl and other assorted nasties that attack fruit trees.

    Here in Worth County, MO, we have apples, pears, asian pears, peaches, nectarines, plums, and cherries. The pie cherries do much better than the sweet cherry; it's really pushing the zone to grow sweets.
     
  14. mellowguy

    mellowguy Well-Known Member

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    I order my plants from catalogues, and the company I use is located in one of our coldest provinces and guarantees their plants to Zone 3 weather. That's one of the advantages of being a Canadian buying from a Canadian company.

    Here in zone 5a, we have strawberries, raspberries and apples. Blueberries (or most berries) would have no issues. The company I buy plants from is selling plum trees, and I plan on ordering some in the spring. Pears may be borderline. Certain grapes are quite resistant to cold weather.

    The company I'm referring to is T&T Seeds (www.ttseeds.com) and despite their name, they also sell plants. Being a Canadian company, it is probably limited by Ag regulations from exporting seeds and plants cross-border, but browsing their site may help with ideas.