Zig Ziggler on Raising Kids

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by MorrisonCorner, Dec 31, 2006.

  1. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    I am listening to a fascinating podcast from Zig Ziggler. It is his suggestion that you provide kids with cash on Sunday... and the TV guide. To watch parental approved TV the kid must part with some of his cash. Watch less TV, end the week with more money. Watch TV... no money.

    I'm trying to extrapolate this into other behaviors we want to change... for example, I set aside $10 in the beginning of the week. If I go to the gym, I get to keep $2 for each visit. If I don't go, the money gets turned into "savings" never to be seen again (or not until I'm old and gray anyway). If I go to the gym at the end of the week I'd have $10 in mad money.

    Has anyone done this sort of thing with themselves or their kids? Is it sustainable, or do you eventually give up on it as too hokey?

    The latest thing in my town is for kids to be paid, often substantial (very substantial.. think $1000 substantial) amounts of money to eschew all sweets, deserts, cola, etc for a year. It seems to be the rage among fathers and sons to bet each other that one or the other will fall off the wagon, if Dad falls off he pays the kid X. If the kid falls off he loses the money (and a lot of pride is tied up in this too). If they both make it to the end of the year the kid wins his prize and presumably Dad has a smaller waistline.

    When my husband was drinking soda it wasn't uncommon for him to go through $10/week (and that is on sale... more if it wasn't) in pop. That's $40 a month blown. I imagine if I didn't have to buy ice cream, sugar of any kind (breakfast cereal?), etc I'd save another $5/week... suddenly a $1000 incentive doesn't seem so "unreasonable."

    Zig Ziggler's expertise is in sales, and motivating people to buy... he is not, by any stretch of the imagination, an expert in raising children. Is his idea... give the kid a "TV budget" and then let them allocate it as they wish, a wacky idea because there it will have an unintended consequence I haven't thought of?
     
  2. Dutchie

    Dutchie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I do that. For two reasons: 1) to motivate myself and 2) to save money. Actually, I do have a third reason and that is that in order to keep special things special, they should not be enjoyed on a regular basis.

    While some people in my life refer to this (lovingly, I hope) as one of my neurosis, it works for me.

    Now, to "bribe" kids this way .... I don't think it is a good idea. I have never felt that I should have to bribe my kids in order for them to do what I asked them to do. I always considered that "training for the future" and teaching them descipline.
     

  3. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think it depends on the kids and the family situation. If your kids watch too much TV, it would be better to sit down with the TV guide and help them decide which are their favorite shows and start from there. They can learn to turn the TV off when their favorite show is over instead of watching show after show. I think using the TV as a reward or punishment makes TV important.

    To teach kids about making money and saving money and spending it wisely, they need to have money, but not quite enough. If they spend all their money on fast food, then they won't have money to go with their friends to the movies, for instance. And they need to have their own bank account, either a real bank account or a piggy bank. If a parent is the bank account and decides if the child should have his own money, the kid never learns to handle money himself. They have to be allowed to make mistakes.

    If you give your kids a clothing allowance at the beginning of school and go shopping with them, they learn to stay within a budget. If they go shopping without you and buy inappropriate clothing, they learn how exchanges and returns are done at a store. If they can't exchange inappropriate clothing, they learn how easily they can throw money away when that clothing article is tossed out.

    I can see where Zigler is coming from. Kids learn to handle money by handling money. To earn money, though, I'd rather pay an allowance that is supplemented by extra work. We always paid for lawn mowing, for instance, but not dishwashing.
     
  4. Dutchie

    Dutchie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I understand what you are saying and I agree with teaching kids how to handle money properly. But I don;t think that letting them use that to watch or not watch tv shows that the parents have deemed appropriate for their kids .....well..... inappropriate. (sorry to use that word twice in one sentence).

    (Like you, I always felt that doing the dishes was part of contributing to the family and never paid for it).