Yummy weeds!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by mammabooh, Sep 25, 2006.

  1. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    I've been battling chickweed in my garden this year. Yesterday, I decided to eat some of it. Good heavens...the stuff is quite yummy! I'll bet I couldn't tell the difference between it and spinach if I was blindfolded. I just harvested a bunch of it for in our salads tonight. Of course, now that I've decided that I like the stuff, it will probably all die.

    As I was typing this our 4-year-old son just said "Mamma, why are we gonna eat weeds?" He's so much like his father!
     
  2. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    What's the difference between a herb and a weed? A weed is a plant nobody yet has found a use for!

    Chickweed is edible, and delicious. Just make sure you've identified it correctly, and if you have animals doing their business all over it (easy, because it's a groundcover), don't use it!

    Culinary Uses: Eat in salads or sandwiches, or cooked like spinach. Add some to quiches or stirfries.

    Medicinal Uses: The leaves, as a poultice or infused as a wash, are used externally for treating many different skin disorders, including boils, sores, eczema and other itchy conditions, cancer, swollen testicles, haemorrhoids and sore or inflamed eyes. Added to a bath, the infusion will help reduce inflammation and encourage tissue repair. Internally, the infusion is also used to treat urinary tract infections, bronchitis, laryngitis, internal ulcers, liver ailments, minor blood poisoning, pleurisy, bowel complaints and constipation. Externally, it is useful for inflamed surfaces, skin diseases, boils, scalds, burns, inflamed or sore eyes, erysipelas, tumours, piles, cancer, swollen testes, ulcerated throat and mouth, and all kinds of wounds. It is very high in a wide range of nutrients. Reputed to regulate the thyroid gland. Used daily, it has a reputation for being helpful in weight-reduction regimes, as it reduces the appetite. Helps dry up mother’s milk when weaning.

    http://www.prodigalgardens.info/chickweed recipes.htm
     

  3. omnicat

    omnicat Well-Known Member

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    Of course, now that I've decided that I like the stuff, it will probably all die


    BWAHAHAHAHAHA!

    That might actually work. I know purslane's edible. I think I'll have to go look up spotted spurge. If I can get it to think I want to eat it - mebbe it'll all die!!
     
  4. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    Thanks for the extra info, culpeper!

    Omnicat, I've eaten purslane...it's pretty yummy too. I just don't have enough of it to put it in a salad. I usualy just pull off a leaf and eat it when I see it.

    Anybody eat thistle? Now THAT one, I'd like to get rid of!
     
  5. deaconjim

    deaconjim Appalachian American Supporter

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    I always figured that, if I could find a good use for cockleburrs, a blight would kill them all.
     
  6. dcross

    dcross Well-Known Member Supporter

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    <<Anybody eat thistle? Now THAT one, I'd like to get rid of!>>

    Keep bees, then this will happen:)

    http://www.newfarm.org/research/2005/feb05/ca_thistle.shtml

    <<The bacteria cause the host plant’s foliage to lose its chlorophyll and turn yellowish white, weakening the plant’s root reserves. >>