your favorite time to start woody cuttings?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by pepper, Jan 20, 2007.

  1. pepper

    pepper Well-Known Member

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    M~i~ss~i~ss~i~pp~i !
    hullo all!

    i was planting the rooted cutting of heirloom roses i got last feburary from the old rose society here, and i relized it was the most successfull rooting i had ever done of roses.
    so feburary it is for roses in central mississippi.
    [btw feb.3rd at the jim buck ross agriculture museum/jackson will be the date this year for the rose society's pruning party.]

    how about fig trees? which month have you had the best results for?

    anyone have luck with rooting pear tree cuttings?

    i've grafted & bud grafted apples, but i would rather grow the old unnamed farm pear i found on it's own roots.

    can you tell spring & flower planting fever has hit me?, lol!

    ->pepper zone 8b
     
  2. RoseGarden

    RoseGarden Well-Known Member

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    I am in USDA 8b, in east Tx., and I set roses and figs to root in January. It takes the figs a while to make callus tissue, so they usually don't root immediately, but by March or April they are starting to leaf out. I also have rooted cuttings of althea trees and pomagranates at this time of year.

    Figs will also root in August, on mature growth of the same season, but you must keep them covered and humid.

    I have probably rooted other things in January and February, but that is about all that immediately comes to mind.
     

  3. pepper

    pepper Well-Known Member

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    thank you ms. rosegarden!
    going out to any graveyards to take cuttings this year? i hope to make at least one trip myself.
    ->pepper
     
  4. RoseGarden

    RoseGarden Well-Known Member

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    No, unfortunately there aren't any cemeteries around here that have old roses, so I don't do that. But I do usually go to a local veterinarian's office every year and take some cuttings of a huge Duchess de Brabant they have growing out front. It's an OGR that roots very easily. It's awfully easy to get addicted to the OGR's, isn't it? :angel:
     
  5. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    RoseGarden, I am nearer to Houston but wonder about your process for rooting roses and figs and pomegranates.
     
  6. RoseGarden

    RoseGarden Well-Known Member

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    Well, basically it's the lazy method, as I have so many other things to do all the time. This is the method that works for me, and may not for others, but I like it.

    I root cuttings outside, in raised 'nursery' beds. The actual method varies only slightly for roses, figs, and pomagranates.

    For roses, I take cuttings that are dormant (or as near-dormant as the variety allows--some chinas and teas don't really go dormant, per se) and about 8 to 10" long. I make an angled cut about 1/4" below a node. I take a very sharp pocket knife and remove a vertical strip of the green 'skin' about 1/2" long on the side of the cutting opposite of the bottom node. (So what you end up with is a cutting with a node at the bottom, and a very thin, narrow slice of skin stripped off on the opposite side of the cutting, also at the bottom of the cutting). This method is supposed to maximize rooting area. Dampen the cutting and dip it in rooting hormone. Make a hole in the soil (a good sandy, loamy well draining mix) with a pencil so it's about 5" deep. Place the cutting in the hole and firm the soil. I usually root lots of cuttings, so I make a row of them, placed about 4" apart. I usually make about 4 or 5 rows of cuttings, each row a bit shorter than a 'clear' or opaque, white plastic Rubbermaid tote. I then water the bed, and place the tote upside down over the cuttings, so it makes a sort of greenhouse. This holds in humidity and lets in light without cooking the cuttings. On really sunny or hot days, you might need to prop up the edge of the tote a bit to let out the heat. Keep the bed evenly moist but not wet. Cuttings should root in 1 or 2 months. When there is a lot of new growth in the spring, you can remove the totes gradually, and then after they grow on a while you can carefully separate the plants. If you want bigger plants, you can let them grow kind of crowded together all year, then prune them back hard in the winter and dig and move them. This results in bigger plants but the nursery bed is tied up all year and looks kind of messy.

    For figs, I use pretty much the same method, but with a few minor variations. Cuttings 8-10", cut just below a node on an angle, but I don't strip off the bark on the opposite side. Dip in rooting hormone and pot up in a very well draining soil mix (I often use about half perlite and half peat-less soil mix, something with a lot of sand). I pot the cuttings up as opposed to doing it in the ground because of root knot nematodes. I place the pots on landscape fabric and water well, and place the same opaque totes over them, checking on them often to make sure the soil is just slightly damp. When a few inches of new growth appears, gradually remove totes to allow plants to acclimate. Figs should be left to grow on in pots for the summer, because often it will look like they have new growth on them as if they have rooted, but they haven't, and if they are unpotted and planted in the ground, they might die. Well rooted, potted figs can be planted just about any time of year.

    Pomagranates--I do these really different, because I"m lazy. I take cuttings about 2 or 3 ft. long and dig a shallow trench, maybe 6" deep, and bury the cuttings lenthwise and leave about a foot sticking out. I don't cover them, don't put rooting hormone on them. Just bury them outside and let them go.

    I hope this information helps.

    I forgot to mention that figs can be easily air-layered just about any time of year that the fig is actively growing, the layers being taken on mature wood. The method of air-layering can be 'googled'. You can root a larger plant this way. I have successfully rooted figs this way that yielded plants that were 3 ft. tall when potted.
     
  7. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    WOW thanks a lot. I really want to try this year.
     
  8. southrngardngal

    southrngardngal Well-Known Member

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    Pepper, I live in Central Mississippi. I have roses rooting now that I started around the 5th of January. I usually put my cuttings in the last of December but this year am about two weeks late.

    I have hydrangeas, tulip magnolias, roses, forsythia, euronymus and roses rooting. Oh and gardenias too. I have tried time and again to root camelias but have never had any success. Then I heard that any winter blooming plants should be rooted in the summer. I am going to try this summer and maybe this time I can get some cuttings from Mother-In-Law's beautiful camelia to root.

    Do you ever listen to the Gestalt Gardener on MPB? Felder Rushing mentioned a cemetery around Jackson that he and Dr. Dirt go to and make cuttings. I forget the name of the cemetery but he said there were some antique roses there. Also, some more modern roses such as Knock-Out.

    I would love to visit that old cemetery and do some cuttings of the antiques.

    southrngardngal-Jan
     
  9. pepper

    pepper Well-Known Member

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    cool! you wanna be a rose rustler too ms. southerngardngal? i 'm down the road from you a bit on highway 25.
    i think mr.felder & dr.dirt talk about the natchez city cemetary? but i dunno, might be the big civil war era cemetary in columbus?
    there is a 'non-rustling',lol, rose cutting party by the old rose society it is scheduled to be feb. 3rd at the jim buck ross agricultural museum rose garden in jax. i'll be there, come on down!

    i am even lazier than you ms.rosegarden,=-) i take pencil thick cuttings and stick them at an angle into as large pots as i can scrounge,3-5 gallon] in regular garden soil mixed with compost & mulched in pinestraw and if i remember i'll cut the bottoms off of 2 liter bottles & put them over the cutting with no top on them as mini hot houses. i set the collection of pots in dappled shade & let them go.
    i grow organically so i do not use rooting hormone, i like to air layer things so i will give my new fig trees a go with that next summer when they are a bit bigger. thanks for the great info!
    ->peppergard
     
  10. southrngardngal

    southrngardngal Well-Known Member

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    ***there is a 'non-rustling',lol, rose cutting party by the old rose society it is scheduled to be feb. 3rd at the jim buck ross agricultural museum rose garden in jax. i'll be there, come on down!***


    HMMMMMMM....sounds like fun! That would be a good day outing for hubby and me. When he gets home tonight, I will put the bug in his ear. LOL

    I heard Felder and Dr. Dirt mention that on one of their programs.

    ssg-Jan
     
  11. pepper

    pepper Well-Known Member

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    i'll be there!
    i'll be the one going by the name pepper,with a big grey stripe in my hair, shadowed by a talkative 6 year old whirl wind. :p
     
  12. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    Hey Pepper, have you ever tried the willow water "rooting hormone"? I have read about quite a few times but wonder if anyone is having success with it.
     
  13. pepper

    pepper Well-Known Member

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    hello valent,
    i've used willow water but only on non-woody cuttings-housplants, leaf rooting & all where the soil needs to be kept moist or they are rooted in water directly.
    the water willows root in is high in rooting hormones so it does help speed up rooting in other cuttings, and i think it gets them to root along more surface area too?
    have fun~try it all!

    this saturday is the cutting party at the jim buck ross agriculture museum,lakeland drive,jackson mississippi. bring a sack lunch,warm clothes and a pair of pruners ~clippers ,as well as something to transport all of your cuttings back home with. =-)
     
  14. marcir

    marcir Well-Known Member

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    hi, RR's and masked highjackers everywhere! Another good source of a twig or two is abandoned farmsteads and even properties for sale, if you are so bold. My old friend in Oklahoma wasn't satisfied with cuttings on these evening raids, she would dig the whole rose!
    For those on the Ca Coast, there are OGR cuttings for sale every spring at Filoli, the historical mansion off La Canada Road south of Half Moon Bay. They have a large collection of heirlooms brought from Europe by the mistress of the house.
     
  15. southrngardngal

    southrngardngal Well-Known Member

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    { QUOTE=pepper]
    this saturday is the cutting party at the jim buck ross agriculture museum,lakeland drive,jackson mississippi. bring a sack lunch,warm clothes and a pair of pruners ~clippers ,as well as something to transport all of your cuttings back home with. =-)[/QUOTE]

    Pepper, will the "cutting party" still be held if the weather is cold and nasty like it is today? Just wondering. Hubby and I were planning to come until we saw the weather report.

    Thanks.

    southrngardngal-jan
     
  16. pepper

    pepper Well-Known Member

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    yup, the pruning is still on, starts at 9am.
    i think it is awful bitter,blustery cold weather every year? last year it rained a bit on us too! wear the big poofy jackets!

    http://www.msogr.com/Calendar_of_Events.html
     
  17. southrngardngal

    southrngardngal Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info. I will try to be there. I will be the short, squatty one with a tall gray-haired handsome man. LOL

    Jan