Homesteading Forum banner
1 - 20 of 58 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings everyone.

I have been on this forum for a while, but this is my first post - and first time looking into this sort of thing seriously.

I am 21 years old as a freshman in college (I got in late you see) and I eventually want to move off grid. What I am wondering is what steps I could take now which will turn going off grid from a mere dream into a real possibility.

I am aware that gaining general practical skills is always useful, but which ones should be prioritized still seems unclear to me.

One more thing I should is that I have one big advantage: for various reasons, I got free tuition at my university, meaning my debt once I leave will be considerably lower at worst, if I haven't played it off by that time already anyway.

I wish you all the best.
Sincerely, Aonghus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
731 Posts
Going off grid is not that hard , the hard part is making a living to stay off grid .
I’m off grid but I have to visit the wife and kids and do some work So we can live .
You need to be able to build your home , fix every thing , water , power Fix truck trailers
cars cut wood heat the place .
Then you need a wife ? It’s hard to land a wife in the woods in the middle of now wear .
at my place I get 3 radio stations that are on a loop they play the same 40 songs over and over .
I can get some tv to stream if the stars are aligned. finish school that is where it starts
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,974 Posts
Posted 3/ 16 /21 12:12 AM CDST

By "off grid" are you talking utilities and such or life not as a "number"?

If utilities off grid , you have to consider how many conveniences you can exist without and find alternatives as water source and heat and food production , preservation and if needed refrigeration.

If you want to go off grid from "feel like a social security number" aspect , you will have to consider the above and possibly converting to Amish, but part of you is still on grid.

I know some who went off grid utility wise and used wells , out houses, kept some food livestock , gardened , hunted and foraged and used wood heat in their cabins but they still had to interact on grid to earn money for supplies they had to buy and pay their property taxes.

Some were military vets with PTSD issues , some just wanted out of the rat race, but most ended up living as hermits.

The ones who didn't live as hermits, in addition to small holding gardening and using well water , wood heat and coal oil lamps, interacted with the on grid world selling their off grid produce and crafts at poverty wages to purchase the necessities they couldn't produce themselves.

There has always been a "grid" as long as some were proficient at things and others proficient at other things and they bartered.

We now live in an era where folks want to follow their dreams and think all the answers are on the web without giving deep consideration to balancing their dreams, abilities, future capabilities and how far they can travel away from the intensified on grid environment they want to escape before they get close to the next grid intense area.

The first thing to consider is wherever you go, you have buy land and pay taxes or be a wanderer or squatter and hope you don't get run off.

For now, your best bet is to get your education and participate on HT or other forums , ask questions of an aspect of your goal one at a time as you consider your path and how far you can comfortably travel it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,171 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,950 Posts
"A young man who is not a liberal has no heart..An old man who is not a conservative has no brain. - Winston Churchill

You don't have to be "off grid" to homestead/lead the simple life. You don't even need a lot of land to grow most of your own fruit and veggies, raise chickens, rabbits, goats etc on an acre or even less.

Start small. Expand when possible or necessary.

Wellbuilt brigs up a good point about the social aspects to be considered for a young guy...There was that song right after WW I- "How you gunna keep 'em down on the farm after they've seen Paree..."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,171 Posts
"A young man who is not a liberal has no heart..An old man who is not a conservative has no brain. - Winston Churchill

You don't have to be "off grid" to homestead/lead the simple life. You don't even need a lot of land to grow most of your own fruit and veggies, raise chickens, rabbits, goats etc on an acre or even less.

Start small. Expand when possible or necessary.

Wellbuilt brigs up a good point about the social aspects to be considered for a young guy...There was that song right after WW I- "How you gunna keep 'em down on the farm after they've seen Paree..."
Doc, I'm in total agreement.

Our young enthusiast hails from Brentwood, MD. One does not get much more citified than that.

No offense intended to present company, however, Going "Off Grid" is in my observation much like going Vegan. More of an exercise in political idealism rather than practicality or for health reasons.

Hardcore off grid is not for the faint of heart, nor the shallowly committed.

Shrek mentioned the Amish. I know the Amish in Seymour, MO, love them, admire them and am amazed by them. Even they are tied to the grid through having we "English" take them shopping in Springfield, 40 miles away, hauling stock to market, etc.

It is still a hard life that they enter into and live by choice, surrounded by the cushy luxuries that we English consider necessities.

Can you picture your average gamer addicted 15 year old, out driving a three horse hitch of Belgians plowing a field after milking 10 cows by hand?

Nearly everything becomes something of a bastardization. Living in an on grid community and installing solar panels to become free of the electrical grid, etc.

IMHO it rises from a need to be independent and able to survive when all the rest of the wimps in society are hiding under their beds trembling with fear of the unknown, which in most cases is nearly everything because they have been spoon-fed for for so long. The phony Covid panic has proven that beyond all doubt. Toilet paper? Seriously?

If one craves isolation, there are plenty of places where one can disappear, but what gain is there in having to trek 50 miles out of the wilderness for a gallon of milk or a beer, since we humans were created as social creatures in the first place?

My Amish "Brother" Jonas told me this one a few days ago;

An English asked an Amish what they planned to do with all of the corn in their garden, to which the Amish replied, " We eat what we can eat and what we can't eat we can."

Jonas' Dad Amos added to it a couple of days later when I brought it up to him. He said that the Englishman didn't quite understand the Amishman and was talking about it to one of his friends, he said, "Yeah, that Amish told me that they eat what they can of their corn and what they can't eat, they eat that too."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,171 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Aonghus Cronin

·
Gadabout
Joined
·
3,106 Posts
It depends on whether you mean producing your own electricity or going completely non-electric. Going non-electric would be the cheaper way to do it and easier to sustain long-term. However, it would be a culture shock for anyone not raised that way. You would have to do everything by hand (get water from a well, raise animals and butcher them, raise an extensive garden, learn ways of preserving food, build a fire to heat and cook - and that would be after cutting your own wood, It would help to have a comprehensive how-to library so you can look up how to do things you don't know.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,914 Posts
You can start off "on the grid" and gradually add your own power sources like wind or solar to the point you are actually selling power back. For that you need a good location for solar (lots of sun), or wind (lots of open space). The needed equipment for this is pricey however.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,171 Posts
pooped like the bears.... in the woods!

Wait a minute! Do you posses the actual answer to that age old rhetorical question?!!

Ok, Ok, riddle me this Batman.

Does a chicken have lips?

Is the Pope Catholic?

And for the grand finale:

Why do cows wear bells?
.
.
.
.
.
.
Because their horns don't work
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,508 Posts
If your goal, is simply to "get off the grid", you can do that right now.....just go down in the basement and flip the main breaker. I'll wager you that when your wife gets home from work, she'll send you back down there........

Mom was really giddy the day we set the old Kalamazoo wood cook stove out in the yard and she turned the knob on her new GE to start supper. And Dad really enjoyed training the cows to wear the Surge milker strap around their bellies..

For me, the goal is not to get off the grid, but prepare for when the grid goes off. I'm thinking about stimulating the economy by getting a natural gas powered Generac.....

Besides, in the next five years, all our cars will be plug ins....

FWIW

geo
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
346 Posts
What does "off the grid" mean to you?

I'd do lots of planning on paper, because it's free, and will help position you for success in any piece of getting towards your goals.

I'd work towards mortgage-free (or possibly rent-free, in your case), because this also better positions you to do something, when you are ready to do it. You want to achieve this state of affairs by your 30's, not your 50's ...

Think of the turmoil of the last year, and all the folks who lost work, lost roofs over their heads, etc. Now think of riding through that with no rent or mortgage, even if you lost your job. Planning and preparing for these things, vs reacting too late to them ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,128 Posts
Greetings everyone.

I have been on this forum for a while, but this is my first post - and first time looking into this sort of thing seriously.

I am 21 years old as a freshman in college (I got in late you see) and I eventually want to move off grid. What I am wondering is what steps I could take now which will turn going off grid from a mere dream into a real possibility.

I am aware that gaining general practical skills is always useful, but which ones should be prioritized still seems unclear to me.

One more thing I should is that I have one big advantage: for various reasons, I got free tuition at my university, meaning my debt once I leave will be considerably lower at worst, if I haven't played it off by that time already anyway.

I wish you all the best.
Sincerely, Aonghus.
Number one. When time travel. South and South West. Check out price of Propery and jobs. You hve to have income. Take a couse in Carpentry while in College even if you have to go to night school for that. You need to learn how to build your own house. Be sure and get at least 4 years college. Courses in building Design helps you all your life. Business managment is a must.
Good luck.
 
1 - 20 of 58 Posts
Top