You can never go back home again

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by Zipporah, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. Zipporah

    Zipporah Well-Known Member

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    There's an old saying I heard growing up that you can never go back home again.Never understood it until now.As a child I grew up with thick woods beyond the fields that were plowed by family for generations. This was my play ground.I knew the woods.They knew me.They had character and I was at home playing in them.I knew the best swimming holes where water was clean and clear, fresh from artesian wells.I swung from a swing made beneath an old oak that watched over countless children and generation before. I picked wild blackberries and crab apples.Fished and skipped stones on the lake shores.This was my play ground. I was safe here.I knew to watch for snakes,wild pigs, and bob cats.They didn't bother me.Jack rabbits use to jump out from sage grass that was over my head sending me in a mass of giggles.Birds and squirrels worked on there nest and were there for my amusement and wonder at their feats.I knew the woods.They were my home.The tall pines reaching for the sky and the grandfatherly oak with strong branches to climb,the China berry tree I sat under on sunny days and the chestnut tree these were the guarders of my youth.My joys,tears,and silent moments spent beneath the branches that my fore father and mothers had played under.I felt safe there.Peaceful and at home.Nothing prepared me for the horror of my eyes when we arrived to what was once my play ground.The woods were gone,the giant trees cut to the ground.The paper mills I was told were given a lease on the land by some cousins and gone is the beauty of the land.The tall pines were stripped of their bark and laid in scattered stacks looking like nude bodies of those murdered.The great oak was gone.A stump and mass of roots burned in a jumble of limbs from the China berry and chestnut.The creek and artesian well were nothing but a muddy place filled in by brackish water and oil spots.No child would ever swim there again.The lake looked silent.No fish jumped,the water stood still and had taken an orange brown color.Toxic was my thoughts.My playground was destroyed.Scrapped to the dirt and for what ... a piece of paper...a buck.It sicken me.I can not go home again.
     
  2. kitty32_z8

    kitty32_z8 Well-Known Member

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    My husband and I live where we grew up. Our forests have been taken away too. We can no longer go home either. As more people move out here the worse it gets. Still better to raise kids in than the city but not the same as we grew up in.
    Sad but true.
     

  3. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Too bad you didn't buy the place from your grandparents. The only land that will not change is land under your own control....but even that land will change due to natural succession, forest fires, insects, wind damage, etc.

    Kitty how were your forests taken away from you?
     
  4. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    It's probably a subdivision name after what they destroyed to build it.
    Your right.
     
  5. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    It's probably a subdivision named after what they destroyed to build it.
    Your right.
     
  6. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Being native Floridian I see this state devastated by the out of state developers, such should not happen. But yet I am not allowed to change this.
     
  7. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

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    :) I came home. Things have changed some but not much.
    I was shocked to see that not only were most of the same buildings in the area still there. They were the same color!
    Main street had changed a lot because of a train that exploded in the middle of town years ago and blew a bunch of it away but there are still plenty of the old buildings there too.
    The woods where I grew up is mostly the same. The pastures are all gone. They are housing developements and a golf course and a barbeque place.
    I now live across the river in an area that is much the same. I fish in the river I learned to swim in as a kid and I still hike the woods and pick wild berries and nuts and persimmons as I did then. I am too darn old to climb trees or swing from grape vines. Thats a shame. I garden and take care of my farm animals and thank the Lord everyday that he led me back here to finish out my life.
     
  8. BamaNana

    BamaNana Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am in no way against RESPONSIBLE logging. We all need wood products/byproducts, but clearcutting is a sad, sad practice
    "One forestry expert refers to the practice as "an ecological trauma that has no precedent in nature except for a major volcanic eruption."
     
  9. kitty32_z8

    kitty32_z8 Well-Known Member

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    "your'" forest was a relitive term. Expressing the forest that we played in as kids relating to the discription given by the original poster.
    You feeling a bit testy today? :shrug:
     
  10. RoseGarden

    RoseGarden Well-Known Member

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    Zipporah, I could pretty much feel your horror and dismay. I have seen so much clearcutting around here, it's a terrible terrible thing.

    The place I have here was scraped down to the bare dirt before I bought it years ago, which is why I got it cheap. I've been slowly re-growing my own woods, but I don't have the space to compensate for the clearcutting all around me, the new subdivisions sprouting up like crops of toadstools, new 'retail centers' and apartment complexes where people live stacked up like rats in cages. My small piece of land will never have room enough for all the displaced animals and plant species, but I can plant quite a variety of things native to this area and hopefully provide a habitat for some of the birds and wildlife. Been working on it for a while now. And when the woods are gone all around my property, mine will still be, God willing, here.
     
  11. Trixie

    Trixie Well-Known Member

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    This reminds me of the John Denver song (may be older than that).

    The singer is asking his father to 'take him back to Mulenburg (sp) county, etc., etc., where Paradise lay'

    The father replied, "I'm sorry my son, but you're too late in asking. Mr. Peabody's coal train done took it away."

    I think about that every day when I see two or three coal trains hauling away NE Texas.

    Also, our children were raised in the country. WE bought 14 acres of what everyone thought was just rough land. A creek that originated on the place, ran down through the middle. People actually laughed at us. There were little clearings here and there. We just used what was cleared - even left the underbrush for critters and birds.

    When we could no longer use our wells because of pollution, we sold to a neighbor. We told him of the problems, but he thought his horses could drink the water and wanted that creek that never went dry. Eventually, it got so bad, even his animals couldn't drink it.

    He sold the timber, and everything is gone - but my kids had it for a while. That's more than a lot of kids have. Their friends are all grown now, some kid is always telling me how much fun they had on our place.
     
  12. Kstornado11

    Kstornado11 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There is nothing like the peace & serenity of the Woods. Where I grew up, I spent every spare moment in the woods. They are mostly gone now, swallowed up by yuppies who moved to the country & cleared away nature for manicured lawns. Today we took the kids & the dogs for a long walk in the woods that surround our home, even got lost a few times!! It was awesome...
    I am SOOOO happy that my kids have the chance to enjoy nature as I did as a child. The worst day of my kife was when we moved to "town" as a teen, nothing was ever the same again.
     
  13. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    It goes both ways Zipporah. I have always been a city girl. We moved alot as a child and I have always had fond memories of the places we lived. A couple of years ago dh and I took a trip that went through a lot of my old "stompin' grounds" and I was shocked to see how they had changed.

    The biggest shock of my life was Phoenix. When I lived there it was a nice, medium sized town. It has grown four times the size that it was and now has problems with gangs, crime, etc.

    It's true, so true. You can't go home again. So you have to be content with your happy memories.

    donsgal
     
  14. Westwood

    Westwood Well-Known Member

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    Luckily where I grew up near Chouteau, OK it's much the same as it was when I grew up in a small cattle operation there. We drove cattle to Chouteau to loan on cattle cars, shipping them to Kansas City for sale. Oh, there are more houses, many more. But from the Big Pasture to Scaleyback Mountian, it's still 8 square miles of prairie and none of those darned "pole lights" inbetween. I'm sure that'll be gone soon too though. We've seen the lights of Tulsa behind the "mountain" for decades.
     
  15. Shygal

    Shygal Unreality star Supporter

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    That was my worst day, too. Nothing was ever the same.
     
  16. wyld thang

    wyld thang God Smacked Jesus Freak Supporter

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    It's good though, to define your memories and to know how those experiences made you what you are today. Same thing happened to my woods, too. But I still dream about them. They still live on as a part of me.

    Regarding clearcuts, check out the Tillamook state forest. This area was literally "glassed" by horrendous forest fires about 70 years ago(repeatedly in some areas). The davastation was equal to a nuclear bomb(without the radiation). And yet today it is an absolutely beautiful and diverse ecosystem. The only thing humans brought in were millions of trees planted or seeded, the rest blew in or recovered from the soil. This arose from destruction far more severe than a clear cut. TOday it is an experimental forest for the forest service, hopefully their management will be used other places. Of course the secret is not "developing" it ;).

    The environmentalists keep trying measures the stop the experimental management, but very few have ever explored the actual forest or appreciated what has grown from ground zero. I have a few rabid "greenie" friends I've taken in to see, and they were speechless, and changed their minds ;).
     
  17. Macybaby

    Macybaby I love South Dakota Supporter

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    I've gone through this too. But I had to realize that "home" was no longer the farm and area I grew up in. When I was a child the farm was about 30 miles north of St. Paul, MN.

    40 years ago, that 30 miles was a long way away. Now the industrial park is right to the west, and houseing developments all around. The roads have even been moved, and there is quite a mall being built to the north. It is now hard to imagine it was ever farmland. The "homestead" is still there, but as soon as my parents move off (they have an agreement with the developer) the buildings will be demolished.

    It was very hard for me when the devoleping started - I use to ride my horse for hours and hardley spent any time in doors. Now it is hard to reconginze the places I use to spend hours without seeing another human being.

    I've come to accept that for me, "home" is not a location or a chunk of specific property. Yea, it's sad that the land that had been in my family for several generations is no longer, but for my family to try to stop "progress" would have been an ongoing, and eventually a loosing battle. I have siblings who still live on parts of the property - with the traffic noise and the congestions and the laws that come with living in a higher density area. No thanks! I moved 500 miles away.

    My current home reminds me so much of my childhood home. Not because it looks like it, but because the things that made it "home" to me, I have here. I sure hope "progress" does not catch up to me any time soon. But if it does, I stand to make a nice profit on my 40 acres, and then I will move again. If my land never appreciates much in value, that will be better as it means an "progress" has headed in a different direction.

    It was very hard for me to make the change over, and know that my "home" is the lifestyle I choose to live, and the "location" isn't as important as long as I can live the lifestyle that I choose. I love knowing that my home was once someone's dream - built in the late 1800's as a claim shack. I may not be physically related, but I feel a definate conection as a kindred spirit. I like to believe that I am living the lifestyle that the people first lived in this house wanted to live. I may be full of if LOL!! but that is ok - I love this type of life.

    Cathy