Yogurt too lava-like in texture

Discussion in 'Dairy' started by LFRJ, Jun 17, 2017.

  1. LFRJ

    LFRJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That would be the best way to describe it. Nothing wrong with the flavor, just not very stiff and doesn't take to straining. I suspect it's because of the high butterfat content. Am milking a Kinder goat - am thinking it's 5-6%, judging by the amount that separates cold, in bottles in the fridge.

    Any tricks to firming it up? I have a co-worker who wants some, but it will be foreign to them (and I don't want to go into long explanations). I''d heard unsweetened jello, which I have - but not sure at what point in the process to add.

    Replies/suggestionsc appreciated. Am using a decent store-bought yogurt with active cultures as starter.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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  3. LFRJ

    LFRJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Does not strain well. Again,assuming the high butterfat may prohibit the - clogs up the fabric or something, but no, straining it is slow and hardly productive. Was hoping for an additive.
     
  4. cfuhrer

    cfuhrer Wood Nymph / Toxophilite

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    How long are you straining it for?
     
  5. LFRJ

    LFRJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've strained it overnight in standard muslin, but it didn't seem to change it much, or yield much whey. I thought I'd try gelatin. Any tips or traps I should know about in advance?
     
  6. Belfrybat

    Belfrybat Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A friend used to add gelatin to her yogurt. After she scalded the milk, she would add in a half or maybe one package of gelatin to 1 quart of milk. Let cool then add yogurt starter. That firmed it up without it becoming jello like.
     
  7. CajunSunshine

    CajunSunshine Joie de vivre!

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    Maybe change the "strainer" from muslin to cheesecloth (two layers). That should help!


    .
     
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  8. LFRJ

    LFRJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Okay, so I added gelatin, but maybe not enough. Still lava-like. Not runny - Lava! Smooth and consistent, a little thicker than shampoo, not firm at all, very, very little whey at the top of the jar.

    I strung it up with cheese cloth, but it runs right through. (I didn't try doubling it). I tried again with muslin again - and same experience as before. It drips for about 15-20 mins, and then stops - presumably because the cloth gets clogged with butter fat, and ceases straining. I discern this because when pouring/ladeling it off the cloth - which is a real mess - there is a thicker layer close to the cloth, but this layer, or the cloth itself, seems to act as a barrier.

    If I'm right in my assumption, and a high butterfat is inhibiting the straining process, would gelatin even work? I don't know if the gelatin proteins will react well with oil.

    I think I'm going to give up. Perhaps "real" yogurt is supposed to be this consistency. It's got a great flavor - not goaty at all, and is super creamy. I suspect a lot of people would actually like it better! But it really is like making yogurt with half-&-half.
     
  9. CajunSunshine

    CajunSunshine Joie de vivre!

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    Before you give up, try doubling the cheesecloth layers. If the weave is too open for that to work satisfactorily, then triple the layers.

    Don't give up yet! You have come this far, and there is that "one more stone to turn over," lol.

    .
     
  10. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    This might be stating the obvious, but if you feel the butterfat is a problem why not let the milk set in the refrigerator a few days then skim off whatever separates before making your yogurt? I too milk goats, and know the cream doesn't separate easily but just do what you can.

    Don't be afraid to try different things. I really liked straining my yogurt with pantyhose!! I also had fair luck with making my yugurt in Mason jars and straining by loosening the lid slightly and turning the jar upside down to drain the whey out.
    You seem stuck on the gelatin idea, but maybe in your case it isn't the answer. . .
     
  11. LFRJ

    LFRJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks all, for your replies and suggestions. Shannon, it sounds as if you may have shared this experience? I'm open to trying new ideas - am also trying to discern if I'm correct in my assumption.

    I researched options for thickening and gelatin, pectin, gum, and milk solids (powdered milk) were some of them. I chose gelatin because I had some already. I didn't think about skimming the cream first - though yes, Goat milk is stubborn that way.

    Panty-hose - now that is a clever suggestion! I may try that, but am still wondering if it is possible to stiffen this up at all when a butterfat content is unusually high.

    Again, nothing wrong with the yogurt as is - it's just not the same as the commercial stuff and maybe the answer is to re-educate my consumer, eliminating all the fuss. (They can always freeze it for some really good frozen yogurt to which all the butterfat might be an advantage!)

    THanks again, all , for the encouragement!
     
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  12. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    Yep, I have been there and done that with the homemade goat yogurt. My experience is rather limited but I got a good few batches of yogurt and soft cheeses in before late pregnancy dictated that I dry up the goat.

    From my experiments, I found that heating the milk way less when culturing worked a little better for yogurt. Pantyhose was by far the best (albeit, still kinda slow)solution for straining. The good thing about pantyhose is that I didn't lose half the batch trying to strain the whey trough, and I could manipulate it when the holes got clogged to allow better straining. One or two batches got strained so well they became yogurt-cheese (labneh?) That was by far my favorite.

    I never did experiment with gelatin or powdered milk or the like, but I thought that of all the solutions powdered milk was the best idea.

    PS: the runny yogurt makes great frozen yogurt, and the high butterfat makes it even more amazing. The cream cultured into a sort of cream cheese and there were chunks throughout the concoction. There is a really simple recipe on my blog somewhere.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2017
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