Yes, it's the kicking cow again!

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by danes-volkov, Jul 15, 2004.

  1. danes-volkov

    danes-volkov Member

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    I had lots of help when I told of my heifer that is kicking 7 bells out of me when I try to milk. Sadly so far, none has worked but she has kicked me in the mouth causing my teeth to go through my lip! Enough of this, though, I have now obtained an anti kicking bar which I will try tomorrow. Does anyone have experience of these devices? Also someone I know has an elderly bucket (ie single animal) milking machine which they would lend me and I think I could renovate (all the rubber work has perished). Has anyone tried one of these or is it not worth my effort? All thoughts as before, very much appreciated across the Atlantic.
     
  2. Carol K

    Carol K Well-Known Member

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    Ouch!! I don't have experience of using one but know people that have used them, and they do work. If I'm remembering correctly they put pressure on a nerve I think. I'm sure you will find milking much easier.
    Small world though, I used to live in Kent also, near Bromley a place called Hayes. Let us know how it went.

    Carol K
     

  3. AR Transplant

    AR Transplant Well-Known Member

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    Have you tried mentioning slaughter houses while you are standing close to this cow? You might even bring in a few pictures of cows that went "on holiday" when they couldn't stop kicking? :haha:

    I'm just sorta half kidding, but seriously, be careful, she sounds like a handfull.

    Arkansas Transplant
     
  4. Danes I hope your no kick item works. One can put horse hobbles on them and cross tie them. Or put a nylon lariat (with the knot end out of the hondo (eye), run the rope around the cow, immediately after the from legs and go thru the hondo (eye) in the middle of the back. Then run the (knot) end of the rope down the back and hold it in front of the kicking back ones. Go around and in front of back legs then pull the knot end up on the otherside of cow and do a half hitch, pulling the knot end out back (as where the tail follows). With this business one can put down the largest bull God ever made). It pinches a nerve (doesn't hurt them) and they will start to fold and go down if the knot end is pulled. It takes two, if one wants to milk cow out. But it will work, if she doesn't wreck you first.
     
  5. bbmae

    bbmae Member

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    I have used just about everything known to man to keep a cow from kicking. Is the kick bar you have just for one side or does it go over the cow and rest on both sides? Guess it really doesn't matter much. I have used both. Get in nice and close when you put it on so she can't kick you so hard. The truth is the short kicks are so much easier to take than the full leg extension. OUCH!!!
    Back to the subject. It may take a few tries to get it set to the proper size but they work great. Just make sure if her head is locked in a stanchion not to leave her. I have had cows go down but not very often. They work so well because a three legged cow can't kick. (Not very well anyway).
    I started milking by hand but went to a single bucket milker when I began milking more than three cows. Now I use them all the time. Is it a belly pumper? Does the can hang from a strap you put over the cow. I have three belly pumpers and love them. The other kind have a can that sits off to the side and just the claw goes under the cow. Those are great because you don't have to wrestle a 50 pound can off a surcingle. Most definitely the best way to go with a flighty cow. She will kick off the milking claw but not upset the whole can.
    Best of luck to you.
     
  6. I have used one of those bars..
    It works well on some.. It reduces kicking on others.. I wont mention the others!!!
    A farmer friend reckons he has his cow trained..and just needs to show her the device and she stops kicking.

    Any form of restraint..
    Caution: You can end up in all sorts of situations with a frightened cow. Slipping over in the mess she's made is just one of them.
    Usually a frightened cow wont let down all of her milk.

    Cows have been known to cough in order to drop those cups...
    It works well for them with an improperly fitting cup.
    WHEN WILL COWS LEARN THAT THIS JUST MAKES THE MILKING TIME LONGER.!!!
     
  7. danes-volkov

    danes-volkov Member

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    Thank you all so very much for all your help and support, what would I have done without you. Today I've been warned that due to ill health (the kick in the mouth was the latest in a few accidents) I have to give up homesteading for a little while. This will break my heart but I know it's right. So those dear troublesome cows are going to have to go to a new home. I'll be back, you can't keep an old smallholder down!
     
  8. danes-volkov
    Sorry to hear you have to give up the struggle for a while, but your ordeal with young "Sooky" reminded me of one of my Grandfather's cows; a real kicker. She was a great milk cow for over ten years but she couldn't stand to be touched on the udder.

    She would come to the barn to be milked with the rest of his dairy herd and take her place by the barn door. Grandfather milked all of his cows by hand and this Black-Belt level Sabot cow was no different; except that she had to be tied head, legs, body, and tail to the barn door prior to being milked. Now, she stood completely still while the straps were being tied off, but then went crazy when the first touch was applied to her udder. After being milked she was completely docile.

    She never learned to be milked at a stachion but did she to take to being strapped down;go figure.

    Haggis @ Wolf Cairn Moor
     
  9. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Haggis, had a girlfriend like that once................ :D
     
  10. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    Tinknal, YOU ARE BAD! :haha:
     
  11. milkstoolcowboy

    milkstoolcowboy Farmer

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    Once in awhile, you'll just come across a cow that doesn't want to be milked, but that's pretty rare. Unless she is a tremendous cow, one that is competely resistant to milking might not be worth the hassle.

    Many cows are nervous at first, but sometimes this is caused by the cow not being used to being around people and being confined. In our tie-stall set up, you are walking in front of the cows several times a day and they become used to human contact.

    I had one cow that would kick a bit at the milker, not every milking but occasionally. We used what we called the clamp (I believe it's trade name was Kow Kant Kick). It was horeshoe shaped and was placed over the cow's back in front of her hooks, and then tightened down with a hand crank. This pressure in front of the hooks made it more difficult to lift her rear leg(s) to kick. After awhile, we would just barely tighten it down.

    They have them for sale on ebay.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=46528&item=2586976134

    Personally, I think hobbles just make the cow more flighty and I wouldn't recommend using them, but that's just me.
     
  12. stonefly71

    stonefly71 Well-Known Member

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    Take a 3 lb sledge and crack it over the head and send it off to be cut up into hambuger lol Thats one way to stop that crap!
     
  13. NRS Farm

    NRS Farm Well-Known Member

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    Totally agree with the above. I have beef cows and have to milk one for various reasons from time to time. You can imagine how hard that is. Anyway, I too use the cow clamp described above. Never had any problems with it. It presses on a nerve, so I am told, which sorta paralyzes the cow from kicking. I believe it! You can tighten it too much and the cow acts like her back end is paralyzed. The first time I used one I almost had the cow drop down to the floor. Once it is on they rarely kick and if they do it is too awkward for them to actually hurt you. Same thing as posted above...eventually the cow would not kick with barely any pressure...in my case I never milked one of our beef cows long enough to see if I could get by without it. I bought mine at a TSC or local feed store I think.