Yay!

Discussion in 'Beekeeping' started by southerngurl, May 10, 2004.

  1. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Location:
    Arkansas
    Just can't hardly stand to see, zero, zero, never on the forum there, so I am fixing that.

    So, about how much money/ time would be involved in getting started in bees, if one is too dumb to make things herself? Is it something you should start a certain time of year? I would think winter wouldn't be the greatest time. I am pretty darn bee ingnorant. Look forward to learning lots here!
     
  2. justgojumpit

    justgojumpit Well-Known Member

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    May 5, 2003
    Location:
    North Salem, NY
    southerngurl, congratulations on being the first poster on this forum! betterbee.com has a complete hive, with two brood boxes (for larvae and winter honey/nectar supply) two supers included (for your share of the honey), all assembled, for $132 plus shipping. A veil will run you like ten bucks, a hive tool another ten, and a smoker maybe 25. entrance feeder, maybe 5. so that is.... about $180 for the hive and equipment, unless you have to buy a honey extractor, which will be up to a few hundred dollars depending on which style/size you buy. i use another beekeeper's extractor. now say about 70 dollars for a package of bees, shipped. you could also catch a swarm or buy a split from another beekeeper, it all depends how much you want to spend for convenience and availability. for your subsequent hives, you can make splits from your original hive and not have to buy new bees. so each additional hive will cost you $132.

    justgojumpit
     

  3. Queen Bee

    Queen Bee Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Location:
    NC
    :) :D :haha: Can you tell how happy I am?? Bees are wonderful.. I have 10 hives and two nucs. I have been keeping bees for 4 years and learn something new everyday.
    It is an expensive hobby because it is addictive you start with one hive and you'll keep adding!!

    These are the things I purchased for one hive: two hive bodies(brood chambers), three supers(honey), frames and wax for all, inner covers, tops (I purchased the copper English style for mine), bottom board(either solid or screened-I use screened), stand, feeder of some kind. You'll also need a veil, gloves, hive tool and a smoker.

    I did an est. on the cost of each hive..It was around 230.00$ (wooden ware which if painted /stained and repaired when needed should last many years, The bees (if they are healthy and you keep on top of things) can be managed and split into many hives over the years.

    It's fun!!
     
  4. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    Jun 2, 2002
    Location:
    central idaho republic
    I am gonna keep watch on ths forum.... cause i have an interest in learning to hive bees,

    ?'s i have for anyone who can answer as do probably some other folks would be,

    how many pounds of honey does a beginer type hive create l ike the one mentioned above?

    how much does a person leave in the hive to over winter the bees without starving them?

    what may be the best books anyone has read on the subject?

    ok these questions and more i spect will come in time..... Awesome to see a new segment on the forum, and one that can provide a sideline business eventually to a homesteader.!!!!

    William
     
  5. justgojumpit

    justgojumpit Well-Known Member

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    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Location:
    North Salem, NY
    honey: depends completely on your area and the health of your colony. don't expect much of a surplus, though in the first year.

    overwintering: leave the two deep brood chambers in the hive. these will contain honey, pollen, and room for the queen to lay her eggs in the early spring.

    best books: i have read beekeeping for dummies and the beekeeper's handbook. both were very informative.

    enjoy the new forum,

    justgojumpit
     
  6. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Oct 29, 2002
    Southerngurl,

    I would recommend that you get in touch with your local beekeepers association/club. Offer to help a local beekeeper this year to get up the learning curve without spending any/much money. You might have to invest in a hat/veil but if you have a light colored canvas jacket and some heavy pants (again, light colored) you can make do.

    If you decide beekeeping is for you then you can get yourself organized over the winter and get some packages next spring. If you only have one hive you can initially skip getting an extractor and scrape the comb from the frames and then strain it. A bit more work but saves some money if you have more time than money. I highly recommend getting an electric extractor but that's just my preference.

    Mike



    Just my 2 cents.

    Mike
     
  7. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Kansas
    A few interesting bits of information for my fellow newbies...

    Here in Kansas, the average yield for an established hive is 65 pounds, but in some areas of the country the hives will produce much more per hive.

    Honey currently is selling for $3 a pound.

    It is too late in the year to find a package of bees easily, but the beekeepers in my area will be making and selling nucs very soon. After the spring honey flow, the hives have a lot of bees but there is no longer the nectar-bearing plants for them to work on, so the beekeepers often split the hives as soon as the spring honey flow is done or almost done.

    Out here, there is often a fall honey flow, but it is often harsh in flavor so it may just be left for the bees.

    An AWESOME website is www.beesource.com , try out the digital dialog!