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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm totally ignorant as to yarn dyes but was hoping a yarn spinner/dyer could enlighten me. Is there any lead or phthalates involved from natural fiber state to finished state of dyed yarn?
This is something I've been wondering about because of this CPSIA law.
 

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Pure mischief
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I'm not sure I know what you mean. I think there could be in commercial yarn - or even hand died, depending on what's used. Even in "natural" dying there's some really toxic stuff that can be used.
Does that help?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I appreciate the reply flannel but no it doesn't really help. I had hoped for a nice pat answer of no lead or phthalates. smile
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Guess, it depends on whether there is any lead in the water the kool aid is mixed with.
;-)
 

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Glowing in The Sun
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I don't think those 2 ingredients are in acid fiber dyes used on animal fibers or silk. Mordants used can be copper, tin, chromium, and the like (not lead), and the dye itself is made from chemicals, but not from lead. In all my reading and exploration about dyes I've never heard of lead being used in them, nor is lead used as a colorant or ingredient in colored fireworks, which is all metals and salts.

The CPSC is in deep doo-doo about the safety new rule you're referring to, and may undo it. Those of us involved in pyro, which uses even more chemicals and metals, know a bit about it, and we hate the CPSC with a passion (the CPSC is wildly anti-pyro). They are discovering the new rule is pretty much unenforceable because just about everything on the planet will have to be tested, and they don't have the manpower or the funding to enforce it.

Personally, I wouldn't worry about this new rule and yarn dying yet. They will go after pyro first and get all distracted... How would they even find little ol' you, anyways, when they will be going after the whole world with really big fish to fry? Besides, fiber and fabric get washed many times after being made or used, so stuff should wash out of it. I think just about all of us can say we've had yarn and stuff in our mouths as kids and none of us got poisoned.

Just my 2 cents this morning.
 

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Glowing in The Sun
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Pyrotechnics. Fireworks. My DH does some manufacturing. I told him about this thread, and the CPSC concerns and he (jokingly) suggested you try dying with "Paris Green" a hard-to -get green colorant, also known as arsenic.

And for the record, CPSC is the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Their goal is to make all pyro illegal for US consumers, so we hate them with a passion.

But the pyro news is reporting that the CPSC has realized it's taken on too much, so maybe they'll just focus on pyro and drop this lead in childrens' products tangent they're on.
 

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aw man but what if we want to blow up children's products? kewpie dolls look great strapped to a rocket....(just kiddding....)
 

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I'll join your dh in hating CPSC (as well as several other governing agencies who shall go nameless)... and in the interest of not hijacking this thread I'll say no more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
lol, bramble sounds like something my boys did with their toys when younger.

I don't see how they'll drop this lead phthalate law. It passed last summer. They will have to take mucho time getting clarifications and exemptions straightened out.
I appreciate the info as to the dyes.
 

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I'm totally ignorant as to yarn dyes but was hoping a yarn spinner/dyer could enlighten me. Is there any lead or phthalates involved from natural fiber state to finished state of dyed yarn?
This is something I've been wondering about because of this CPSIA law.
With natural dyeing the anwser would be no to an extent.

For the fibers themselves it all depends on where and how the critters are raised. I bought some fleeces for my own personal use from a local grower that had a strange smell finally I called her and asked it what it was - she oils her sheers with diesel fuel. I'm not sure what the lead content on diesel fuel is btw. So I'm keeping those fleeces for myself. Do your critters eat old lead paint off of the barns etc? That WILL show up in the fleeces eventually.

As for the natural dyes, unless they are growing in soils that are high in lead then the answer is No there will be no problems. The mordants I use which are alum, tannin, iron, copper, and cream of tartar are all food grade and come from the US. They are used by the cooking industry.

I"m not sure how the new law will affect any of this as it's my understanding that it's ANYTHING that a child may come into contact with which in my mind would include matresses, sheet rock, wall paint, furniture, etc.

Kimberly
 
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