Woven wire or Electric Fencing?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by mailman, Oct 26, 2004.

  1. mailman

    mailman Miniature Cattle

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    Hello, another question I have is: If I can put up a woven wire fence for Boer goats at $1000 (no additional elect. wires) or a 4-strand electric fence at $800, which one would be more likely to keep them in (and dogs out)? Also, which would be easier to install and maintain? Looking at all the parts required for the electric fence is getting alittle confusing. Thank you for your help.....Dennis
     
  2. Karenrbw

    Karenrbw Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have both types of fencing in our pasture and have good and bad things to say about both. There is always one curious goat that will continually get her head caught in the woven wire fence. Four times in a week we had to wrestle her out. The smaller goats also try to squeeze under the woven wire. The electric fence has been broken by deer and an overzealous neighbor with a lawn mower. Sometimes with the thick winter coat, the electric fence doesn't seem to bother them that much. We have a charger rated for 2 miles on a fence about 70 yards long and they still go right through the wires. Overall, I think I would rather deal with the woven wire. I think those critters can tell when the hot wire is working and when it isn't.
     

  3. boren

    boren Well-Known Member

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    We use high tensile electric for all our pastures. 5 strand, we went 5 feet tall just in case, I would stop at 4 feet and save a wire. We have a 1.5joule charger, not too strong, 1 second pulses of course.

    I haven't had anyone escape yet, even the sheep, knock on wood. No one gets within a foot of the fence.

    Of course, if you have one weak spot then they'll just escape through there. So it doesn't matter if you have 1500' of good fence and a 2 foot section that's broken wrecks it all.
     
  4. coso

    coso Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Didn't you mean "knock on wool" boren??? LOL
     
  5. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i've used both with varying success. this time of year seems to be the hardest time to keep them in. the stuff they love best is eaten down in the pasture, while there is some yummy honeysuckle or something just out of reach. this year i invested in good fencing, which uses both. i put up woven wire, with a hot wire at the top and bottom. and hallelujah they are staying in!!!! i've been using a 50 mile charger, on roughly 1/2 mile of fence. still HOT!!! even when shorted out somewhere. it really does burn the weeds down and is worth the expense..
     
  6. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

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    i used a combination of both, and will again when i get the goats back.
     
  7. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    I'd go with woven ... electric just doesn't seem to intimidate goats very much! :(

    It is helpful to reinforce woven at the top and bottom by running a course of cable or barbed wire stretched very tight, and lashing the woven fence to it. (Of course you will stretch the woven and nail it to your posts first!) You can use cable ties for the lashing. I found this helped in an area where I had some trees growing on the other side of the fence, and the goats would put their front feet up on it to reach the branches. :rolleyes:
     
  8. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    I definitely agree with both. I started out with just electric and had problems. Then with the woven, I had heads get stuck. I now have the woven with a strand of hot on the bottom. Not another head stuck since.

    I understand that you are looking at the price. Maybe you can start with a small area, then continue expanding as time goes on. That was how I started.
     
  9. LuckyGRanch

    LuckyGRanch Well-Known Member

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    BOTH!!!

    We've finally come up with something that is "almost" foolproof and we're talking over 100 goats at peak times. Consider each goat has it's unique personality and with that comes it's own unqiue escape attempts.

    Woven and Electric used in combination seem to outsmart even the most creative of the bunch.

    We have 47" woven field fence and then a strand of hot along the top and 6" off the bottom.

    Barbed wire is a diaster waiting to happen with goats! Sooner or later, you will have a casualty or severe injury if you use barbed (unless you make it hot).

    A 2 mile charger doesn't have enough shock to deter much of anything except a cow or horse that is afraid of even looking at a hot fence! I can keep our little mini in on a single strand of hot wire that isn't attached to a charger. I would consider the 2 mile charger about as effective. Try a 50 mile! Even the meanest goats will respect it.

    If you got high tensile, you'll need 5-6 strands no more that 5-6 inches apart. If they can eye it up and determine their head will fit, they'll make their body fit too....hot or not!

    Order yourself a Premier catalog. Even if you don't order any of their products (fat chance! :)) they offer lots of hints on fencing! Google Premier Fencing....I don't have the link handy at the moment.