Would you rather live in.......

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by akmyilee, Jun 9, 2005.

  1. akmyilee

    akmyilee Well-Known Member

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    Ok, I tried to do this as a poll and couldn't figure it out but the options would be:


    An old pretty much falling apart house

    A ghetto trailer (sw mobile home)

    A nice camping tralier (aka RV)

    A not finished new house

    Shed or barn made into an apartment

    Motel


    This ofcourse would be while you where getting set up on your land and would be building nice house.

    edited to add options
     
  2. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Done three out of four!! Lived in a 10x50' trailer--no,no way you'd call it a mobile home...it was a dump. Kids bedroom 5x6'...no lie...two cribs and had to take the kids out over the end!!! This was while we built our house...which we moved into one night 'cause we had a deep well over there and I blew up about carrying water!! So lots not finished and 100x as hard to do when you are living there. Then we moved to MO to our 100 year old farmhouse. If we'd known we had cloth covered wiring we'd surely never have had the power turned on! Could have built a modern home for half the cost but we love our house....people actually go by and take pictures and many oldsters have stopped to tell us of living here...whole 120acre farm bought for a wagon and team of horses 120 years ago! Old school house site on the land and the older neighbors used to ride their horses there thru the woods. Way cool! Best thing about a "dump" was my lesser interest in housekeeping...knew we were moving on up so didn't care as much! DEE
     

  3. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    Falling down house will eat up $$$ to keep everything working.

    Ghetto trailer :D is a waste of money as what do you do with it afterwards??

    A camper can be sold afterwards or used for vacations(I understand some people take vacations.. :haha: )

    An unfinished new home might be a good choice although living in a construction zone is VERY trying-we have a half finished kitchen right now waiting on a cabinet and countertops as well as backsplash....also how unfinished?Does the house have a certificate of occupancy?

    We REALLY looked at the camper and were leaning heavily that way for our land but there are none for sale around here(really there aren't...no idea why) and every time we went upstate or to NC we would look but the dealer mark-up threw us off buying.

    We are going the barn/apartment route-gives us a permanent structure AND a place to live....
     
  4. JackieA

    JackieA Well-Known Member

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    A nice camping trailer (aka RV) - how fun - granted the house being build would be finished in one summer and it was by the lake or ocean and someone else was building the house!
    JackieA
     
  5. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

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    We didn't do any of these. We started with bare land and stayed in a Motel 6 (it was a pretty nice one) for 3 months while we built the main part of the cabin. My husband was doing consulting work for a local big company and we got the corporate discount and long term discounts so we had 2 adjoining rooms (one for the kids) . It was really a great way to do it. Long, hard days building and a hot shower afterwards and clean sheets at night. The rooms had microwaves and fridges in them so I'd cook something at the building site on a Coleman stove and bring it back to the motel for dinner. By September, we moved into the cabin, and then added on every summer. Worked great for us! The motel was in Sandpoint, a tourist town and the kids felt like they were on vacation all summer.
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Depends some on code where you live. None of the above might be allowed. So assuming you are talking an area where most anything goes:

    I would go for building a shed/ garage with simple apartment features. Live in that while you build the good house. It can always be turned into a nice shop/ garage, or a guest house depending on what your goals are.

    The falling apart house is fine, but will take money to keep it sheltering you for a year, at which point it is worthless. And often it is on the best site for a house, totally in your way, hard to insure, fire trap, etc....

    I hate old trailers. Period. No.

    The travel trailer is just so cramped.... Depends on how many of you/ me there are. One person, maybe two, and I could do that I guess. Would be my second choice I guess. With a family, gotta wonder about tornadoes, hurricanes, winter, or whatever climate you live in. Not the most stable place, not very big, going to feel 'tight' all the time....

    Living in the house you are trying to build is not much fun. You can't get away, & you are always in your own way - both building and living, 24 hours a day!

    --->Paul
     
  7. COUNTRY WISHES

    COUNTRY WISHES Well-Known Member

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    If it was just for the warm weather months I would go with the RV and add a screen house and or a tenant to it. This will give you a lot more room so you don't feel cramped. It will probably be the best way to keep cool in the heat as well.
     
  8. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am with Country Wishes--------Take the camper/rv, but if you have several people--------gota have some kind of make shift room so it don't get cramped, also having some sort of outside bathroom would be nice-----you can recycle Large cardboard boxes(tape some plastic to the outside to make water proof) to help construct a Make-shift toilet. How to build a Make-Shift toilet-----Get 2 or 3 large, free, pallet --If you can find one with the boards nailed tight that would be good for the platform that you can mount the $5 used toilet to that you picked up from a salvage place or the free one you picked up at the dump-----now dig a hole in the dirt about 2ft square 2 to 3 feet deep---take the other pallets and construct a wooden box with no top or bottom(A free barrel would help here--leave top off---put lots of holes in the sides--I shot holes in mine with a high powered rifle) Put the box or barrel in the dirt---Put solid pallet over this hole--cut hole for toilet--lay heavy plastic or tarp over pallet(cut hole out)-mount toilet--take a 10ft piece of pipe--arange it so one end is in the hole and other end is up in the air(Got to have a vent)---Now throw all the dirt you dug out of the hole on top of the plastic thats on top of the pallet---Hook up a hose-----------Now you will have a Official Red-Neck toilet---LOL Oh got to put the cardboard around it so you can go in private---LOL. Randy
     
  9. akmyilee

    akmyilee Well-Known Member

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    Well ya'll are giving me lots of ideas, even came up with stuff I would have never thought of...........

    We are still looking,,,,,,,ya'll are so smart and give me alot to think about.

    THANKS :)

    I am going to edit my first post to add the other ideas........
     
  10. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    I'd pick the RV. And an outside screen shelter would give you an extra room to keep you from being too cramped. Both possible to buy used and even re-sell.

    Oz, have you considered coming to WV to buy that RV? Might find some better deals here and not that far away from you.
     
  11. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    BCR,we are going the build a barn/apartment instead of a camper.

    Thanks fo rthe offer and I would actually like to go to WV-it looks quite nice.
     
  12. Wilhelm

    Wilhelm Well-Known Member

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    I started with the camper, and moved up to the mobile home. I bought a 14x70 trailer with 3 bedrooms and 1.5 baths, for $100. That was 3 years ago. I have saved myself thousands in rent, and I can live here on my land while building my dream home. It's not the ritz, but it is paid for and getting better one bit of do it yourself at a time. It will make a nice rental when my earthship is done, or maybe guest quarters for friends and family. There are lots of old trailers out there for way cheap, they just need a bit of work.
     
  13. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    A truck like we found is more useful, later, and in the begining than an RV, if you can't get a truck and fix it up like we did then get an RV. From another post of mine:

    Good Luck,

    Alex
     
  14. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I really hate old single wide trailers. For one they are a firetrap. I stayed a while in one that was so narrow that I couldn't lay crossways in it. It was that narrow or I was that tall either way the place was pretty miserable to live in. I had to walk around hunched over all the time since the ceilings were so low. When I was working on the cable in the place we didn't have to drill holes in the walls. You just pushed a screwdriver hard against the side and it would punch right through. Oh and the place leaked like a sieve.

    I would build a barn or shed and live in that.
     
  15. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    Well I'm 5 for 5 on your list but you forget large tent. The best was a barn next to where I was building the rest are all about equal after a few months. I lived in a travel trailer for a year but had a nice bathroom/ laundry shed and moved the stuff into the house when done. The bath /laundry made it liveable it was an 8'x12' shed with a toilet tub/shower laundry tob and washer and dryer it was heated and WONDERFUL and everything was used later on so the cost was 0$ kind of.


    mikell
     
  16. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    I'd try, if financially able, to go with the best RV I could afford, with the expectation that I'd be able to sell it when I was done. Buy used, of course, since the things depreciate rapidly. But with RV you have the flexibility to go one of two ways:

    Large.. so almost entirely self contained, kitchen, bath, etc.

    or Small... so "popup." Something to sleep under and keep the bugs off, but most of your day to day living is outside, with some reasonable shelter from the rain on bad days.

    Either way, something of a challege, but in the end you'd still have something useful or saleable, which is more than you can say for Motel 6... which WILL cost a fortune in meals eaten out. And the other options sound like they'd have more headaches associated with them than I'd be willing to endure. Even temporarily.
     
  17. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

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    Nope, didn't cost a fortune at all. Like I said, we cooked meals at the building site, and brought them back to the motel which had a fridge and microwave in the rooms. Breakfast and lunch food were easily stored in the fridge, so we rarely ate out. We were too tired too. We lived in a travel trailer the first time we built 11 years ago and it wasn't nearly as comfortable. And what we had "useful" out of the experience was a nice, relaxed building experience and a lot of happy memories.
     
  18. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

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    We moved onto the land ages before there was water or electricity. Started with a VW Vanagon, then erected a 30x20 metal building (we closed in the ends later). We thought we were hot stuff when we parked the VW inside! The metal building is now a studio/gargage/laundry room. We moved into the farm house as soon as the inspector let us. It may take years to finish, but there is no place like home. The land is primary, the buildings are secondary as far as I am concerned. Live in what you have to, but live for the land, not the structures on it.
     
  19. cookiecache

    cookiecache Well-Known Member

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    When I moved to my homestead in the bush, a tent was home for the first summer. Then I built a cordwood cabin. This is (in my never humble opinion) the best cheap way to go, but if I money was not a concideration, I'd stay nice motel. One with good room service. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

    No, really, a cordwood cabin (12 X 16) can be built from firewood in 2 or 3 days by two people with chainsaws and hand tools. MUCH better than a tent!