Would you cut down established tree for fruit trees?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Hears The Water, Dec 25, 2005.

  1. Hears The Water

    Hears The Water Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hey all. Even though I have an acre to work with, it is mostly covered in trees. I really want to plant fruit trees. But I just hate to even think about cuttind down allready established trees to put in what I want. The only few places that there is full sun will be my veggie garden. There is a small strip of area that has some sun from about 11:00 to 1:00 or 2:00, but that is it. We live in zone 6 and I just don't think that is enough to establish fruit trees. There is an area on the N.E. section of my property that has a bunch of ash trees and I think one black walnut tree on it. I could in theory cut them all down and have the sunlight to grow fruit trees. I know that there would be roots and stumps to contend with, but I am thinking that I could work around them as they where not all that tightly spaced at the bases. Any and all input would be appreceated. I have dreamed of having fruit trees, raspberry, blueberry and strawberry plants. I am just trying to decide if that will have to wait until the next house. Thanks in advance for any and all help.
    God bless you and yours
    Debbie
     
  2. bob clark

    bob clark A man's man

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    I would have the fruit trees. Its ok to cut trees, you are planting more back. good luck
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    If you're planning to move I'd leave as many original trees as possible. Perhaps some thinning would help the majority of the stand anyhow.
     
  4. BrahmaMama

    BrahmaMama Well-Known Member

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    I have the exact same problem, one acre and big sugar bush and mixed hard woods.
    A girls gotta do what a girls gotta do!
     
  5. CraftyDiva

    CraftyDiva Is anybody here?

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    Before spending any money on fruit trees, find out which will grow around a walnut tree. Even though your cutting it down, you'll still have toxins in the soil from years of leaf drop. Not to mention while the roots are dying they will gas off toxins as well. Some trees can grow near a walnut, you just need to find which fruit trees will. I think black cherry will but not apple, you'll need to do a search for a full list.

    Ash is one of the trees that will grow near walnuts, that's why you have them.
     
  6. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    absolutely, what does the other tree do? make shade? the fruit tree's will do that AND feed you.

    seems a no brainer to me, go kill that tree.
     
  7. Hears The Water

    Hears The Water Well-Known Member Supporter

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    CraftyDiva, thanks so much for your suggestion. I googled the problem and this is what I came up with:

    The roots of Black Walnut (Juglans nigra L.) and Butternut (Juglans cinerea L.) produce a substance known as juglone (5-hydroxy-alphanapthaquinone). Persian (English or Carpathian) walnut trees are sometimes grafted onto black walnut rootstocks. Many plants such as tomato, potato, blackberry, blueberry, azalea, mountain laurel, rhododendron, red pine and apple may be injured or killed within one to two months of growth within the root zone of these trees. The toxic zone from a mature tree occurs on average in a 50 to 60 foot radius from the trunk, but can be up to 80 feet.

    Blueberry, black berry and Apple where three of the ones I wanted to plant. So I will have to go out there and take a good hard look at it all. Today I was showing it all to my uncle and I realized that there are three trees that are on the very edge of my property on the other side of the elec. fence that the previous owner had up. So I guees I will need to look into what I would need to do have them cut down. And I will need to find out how much it would cost. I am not allowed to play with sharp things, let alone a chain saw. LOL. I wonder if I could find someone who would do it for me in barter for home made bread..... I will have to ask around. Most of these trees are not very big around. I could easily wrap my arms around with room to spare. (I am 6'2" tall and have long arms, but these are not very big trees any how) So I don't know how long it would take to do it. I think I will need to do a lot of reasearch and going out to the yard to really take a good look around. Darn, I miss John, he would know just how to do this... his dad had a HUGE orchard!

    Paranoid....but worrying over no-brainers is one of my specialities!!! (that and spelling!LOL) :rock: LOL


    God bless you and yours
    Debbie
     
  8. Pat

    Pat Well-Known Member

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    Around here they will buy (standing too) anything 10 inches and bigger in diameter. They will come out and cut it down for you. You get the tops to burn in a stove (if you have one).

    If you can find area's outside that 80 feet, I'd have them cut down, get the money from the trees, and replant with fruit trees. But, you have to remember, the first fruit will take at least 3 years to happen, and it won't be until 5 or 8 years until you have a decent crop off it.

    I recently had 2 trees cut down (to expand our orchard). (The guy has a small ((1 man operation)) sawmill, the bigger sawmills want to have at least a truck load before they'll come out - truck load was 20 - 22 trees) A red oak, and a post oak. I was able to put up about 2 cords of wood from the tops for next winter.

    Walnut is some expensive wood, I'm sure if you found a small sawmill, they'd want to come out and cut it down, and pay decent money for it. (Probably cover the cost of the fruit trees you want to buy to replace it with).

    Pat
     
  9. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    If you are going to be living there for atleast another 5 years I would say cut them all down unless some are nut trees or persimmon.If you only have an acre you should utilize every bit of it for food production.I would plant your front lawn to while your at it.
     
  10. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    My little farm is only two acres my mom is buying it in two years and I am expanding,My present garden is with in 15 feet of a large walnut I would have sold it but my mom likes it.Anyway I grew potatoes near it and tomatoes 50 feet away I sold $400 out of the first years garden there so the walnut did not hurt them to badly it is on the north side so it does not block the light.
     
  11. ErinC

    ErinC Well-Known Member

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    After you destroy the black walnut, maybe you could try grafting your fruit trees?
     
  12. Hears The Water

    Hears The Water Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In all honesty I don's know how long I will be here. I don't know what God has in store for me. I PLAN to be here at least 5 years. And I thing that fruit trees would increase the property value, even inside the city limits. The way my area is growing out in five to ten years this propery will go way up in value. Anyway, each time I have lived somewhere that I could plant a fruit tree I didn't thinking that I would move before I would get to enjoy any of the bounty. Then I would end up living there long enough to have had the furit and I was allways mad that I didn't plant any trees. So this time I am determined to plant them if I can. I went back out there again the other day and looked but I am not sure which ones are black walnuts. I do know which ones are ash, and red bud. And most of what I saw where Ash. There where two or three that didn't have any leaves on them. But while I was out there I did see five or so black walnuts on the ground. I should know what the bark looks like by now, but I don't.

    As far as growing trees in the front of the house, there are two massive sycamores that I know I can't afford to have cut down!! Here is a pix of them.
    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a165/hearsthewater/house05.jpg

    They are way taller than my two story house. I am blessed with a lot of trees and I can't wait unti Spring to see it all pretty. I moved here at the end of Oct and so I don't know what it looks like here in the Spring and early Summer. In fact I am having a hard time deciding where to put my garden and other planting areas because I am just not sure how to trees will play on all of this.

    ErinC, I admit that I know very little about grafting. Could you please elaborate on your comment? I am very interested.
    Anyway, I appreceate any and all information y'all have given me.
    God bless you and yours
    Debbie
     
  13. ErinC

    ErinC Well-Known Member

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    Hi Debbie,

    Sorry it took so long to get back to you. I haven't done grafting myself, but many friends have sucessfully grafted fruit trees. I am planning on trying this soon. A few websites I found interesting & informative: http://www.ext.nodak.edu/county/cass/horticulture/fruit/graft.htm

    This one has some good photos:

    http://www.oreworld.org/grafting.htm

    Also try John Seymore's books on homesteading, these have excellent directions.