Would like to know?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by LiL OHNNL, Apr 5, 2006.

  1. LiL OHNNL

    LiL OHNNL Well-Known Member

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    What questions should I ask before purchasing a goat? I asked you guys what i should know before getting one, now I need to know about getting two? Really what should I know and ask in reference to the animals someone trys to sell me?
    Thanks
    John

    Sorry for the rambling
     
  2. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    I would ask of any testing done, and if the seller has ever seen any type of lump/bump and if the vet confirmed that it was not CL... ask what type of feed they are giving so you can get at least one bag of thier feed to slowly switch over to your preffered feed. I would also ask if/when and what last vaccines were, and when new ones are due. Ask of any recent vet trips within the whole herd. I can't think of anything else right now...
     

  3. LiL OHNNL

    LiL OHNNL Well-Known Member

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    Anyone have anything to add here? I need all the questions I can get.
    John
     
  4. Delinda

    Delinda Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I really don't have much to add to the previous post-I would ask to see the parents, make sure they look healthy. If you are buying kids ask if they have had a CD&T shot and if you need to give a booster, ask if you need to deworm them. If you are buying registered goats make sure you get the papers before you leave with the goats, many people have been promised papers and never recieved them. I would just make sure the kids look "good", eyes look bright, healthy coat, active and running around acting like kids. When ever I sell kids I give a print out of general care and what kind of feed and minerals they are used to getting. Maybe you could ask them to write down a few thing for you.
     
  5. Blue Oak Ranch

    Blue Oak Ranch Well-Known Member

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    Definitely get two, NOT an intact buck. Neutered males (wethers) are good companions and are cheaper than a doe.

    http://www.goatwisdom.com/ch9husbandry/buying.html

    Print it out and take it with you when you go looking.

    I wouldn't buy my first goat at an auction, and I wouldn't buy without negative CL and CAE test papers IN HAND.

    Cheers!

    Katherine
     
  6. toomb68

    toomb68 Well-Known Member

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    john

    why do you want these? what do you plan to do with them? i just got two wethers( you need at least two goats) for pets/ starters. i never had goats before. read a lot....alot of sources suggested wethers would suit my needs. i think you need to tell us what you're goals are....so people can help you with more specific answers

    chris
     
  7. LiL OHNNL

    LiL OHNNL Well-Known Member

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    Right now we are looking for them to be pets. We would like to see what is involved with raiseing them and see where that takes us. So what I was thinking would be to get a wether and a doe which would leave us with an option. Im sure it wouldnt be hard to find a buck if we choose to mate her. So pets at first to be determind after.
    John
     
  8. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    Wethers belong in the freezer. They cost you as much to feed and in the end, will never give you anything in return as far as milk or kids. I would definately get two does. If you ever choose to breed, it would be to your advantage to have two does bred. That way, in case one aborts or doesn't work out as a milker, you have the other to fall back on. Or if one dies in "childbirth", you have colostrum from the other to feed survining kids if they are bred to kid near the same time. The wether would be useless at times like this. Just a feed hog that you would have around for years and years.

    Like the others said, make sure you don't buy diseased animals. You don't want to start with animals like that. It will break your heart. If you don't feel good about the breeder, walk away. All goats are cute, don't let your emotions overrule you. Have you decided on a breed? each one has it's attributes. I like LaManchas because they are quite, gentle and productive. Others prefer the long ears of the Nubians and put up with thier moods because they sell better. Others prefer the swiss breeds and their great production. I would not get a buck if I were you either. Your goats only need a "date" once a year.

    Do get CL and CAE negative animals. In this day and age, serious breeders will have the paperwork for you. And serious buyers won't buy from you if you have that in your herd. And goats are addictive and proliferate quickly. You want to start out right!
     
  9. LiL OHNNL

    LiL OHNNL Well-Known Member

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    thanks fo r all the input.
    Tex that sound like a better idea dont know what I was thinking.
     
  10. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Ditto: be SURE that you do not have a CAE or CL positive goat (if they haven't been tested, ask them to be before you agree to buy). I agree about the wethers. The only thing they might be useful for is packing - but that's really only if you start out with the intention of doing this.

    Check for vaccinations, get the paperwork the day you get the animal, be polite but firm if there are imperfections that you don't want, and don't grab the first goat you see without being objective about her (note the *her* part)...

    And ask about the Houdini aspect of each goat you find: some goats can get out of ANY enclosure, others tend to stay where they are put. Some jump too high even for cattle panels - or they climb them. The sellers should be able to tell you which does need more attention to their fencing than others! :)

    -Sarah
     
  11. Sweet Goats

    Sweet Goats Cashmere goats

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    I think wethers are just fine. If they are only for pets then you don't have to worry about them producing anything.
    I have found that some wethers are better then does. I would never ever butcher any of my animals. Thank Goodness mine are cashmere and our wethers DO produce something. The fiber is just as good and you don't have to worry about those accident breedings.
    Find your goat, fall in love with it no matter what the sex is, just not a buck.