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Kidding. I wouldn't really do it to my short-haired kitties. Though it is so, so, tempting. :facepalm:

(We do shave the two long-haired Persian mix cats down to a "suede coat" level a couple of times a year, because it's shave them or cut dreadlocks out of their coats every few days. Those two are part Persian and part tasmanian devil. It's much easier to slip them some valium and shave them occasionally than try -- emphasis on try -- to brush them.)

It's fall shedding season and there is cat hair EVERYWHERE. I sell on eBay and it's a constant battle to keep cat hair out of the merchandise. I'm using more tape picking up cat hair than I am sealing up packages. They're horking up hairballs and I keep getting cat hair in my mouth and food and I had to clean cat hair out of the shower drain before I could shower today. (One likes to sleep in the shower.)

The next cat I get? Is going to be HAIRLESS!

<end vent>
 

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Found a horse grooming tool that grabs cat hair and you can just lift it off like a little mat. Changed my life.

Jelly Scrubber by Tail Tamer - It looks like a huge cat tongue on one side, and I'm just no good to my kitty anymore unless it's in my hand.

And I forget which Wise One here said that cats will always shed if they're exposed to artificial light when the sun is down - they stay mixed up, I guess it's day length that triggers seasonal shedding.
 

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Ha! ha!

How much light comes through the eyes determines shedding. This is why indoor animals usually shed more than outdoor ones. If you keep the lights off and curtains shut during the day so light doesn&#8217;t come in (like when you are at work) there is much less shedding. Our current cat lives outside. I got a fulminator knock off a couple of weeks ago because he gets matted in the winter. I hope it works.
 

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Re: selling cat hair -- I've been tempted to send Mew Kitty's hair to friends who spin. I know normally that cat hair isn't really suitable for spinning, but given the way she forms mats, she might be the exception. She's part Persian and if allowed to grow unchecked, her coat gets about three inches thick. And it mats up overnight. The only options for grooming her is to strip her coat out regularly (which usually involves blood loss for the humans involved) or shave her.

FWIW, she LIKES being shaved. Okay, she doesn't like the shaving process -- that's usually a rodeo even with sedation -- but once it's done, she's clearly happier. I think she overheats under all that hair, plus she clear prefers being scritched when she's bald. She doesn't like being petted when she's got a full coat.

(Her son has nearly as much hair, a lot more attitude, and is a powerful 15 pounds of solid muscle. He gets shaved twice a year under total anesthesia at the vet's. Just clipping his claws or trimming around his nether regions so he doesn't get dingleberries is a challenge.)

The rest of our cats are short hairs. The only thing their hair would be good for is stuffing pillows. At least they're all good about being brushed.

I'm surprised short daylight hours are associated with less hair loss. Always seems to me the cats blow their coats twice a year -- spring and fall.
 

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I would just like to say that your topic screams of needing pictures! :)

I'll just be waiting for the next time you shave any feline you can get a hold of and praying we get the treat of the before and after pics....:bored:

you're cats must love you to let you even attempt so much hair management. we've had a few over the years who'd cooperate with similar activities and MANY who'd gladly do us in so we'd need medical attention should we even consider such evil-doings. lol.
 
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