wormy root veggies

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by BlessedMom, May 6, 2006.

  1. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

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    Last year was our first major garden at our new place. I tried to grow some beets and radishes but they were all wormy before they were even ready yet.
    I'm getting ready to plant again. What can I do to prevent this from happening again this year?

    I am in Washington State..the WET part. It rains more here than in Seattle!

    ACK!
     
  2. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

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    Anyone? I need to plant this weekend! But I'm afraid to waste my time and just feed the wormies.
     

  3. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds like wireworms. If you had them last year there is a good chance you will have them again - the have a long larval stage. They are most common in new beds and no till beds, so each year you cultivate your beds you should see fewer of them. Crop rotation is important too if you can do it. Corn can be planted as a trap crop (dig it up and burn it). Chickens eat them and of course stomp any you see. You can bury a potato just under the surface and dig it up again every few days to collect and kill them.
     
  4. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

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    This past winter we put pigs in the garden area. They rooted anything and everything in there. Then we went ahead and till everything under a few months ago when we took the pigs to the market. Do you think that would make a difference? We have free range chickens, they are all over it eating bugs and digging down. I haven't planted yet.
    Last year they roamed the garden, but that still didn't help my poor radishes and beets. I want to plant potatoes but I'm afraid to!
    We had the WORST garden last year!
     
  5. Island of Blueb

    Island of Blueb Island of Blueb Supporter

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    I can't grow radishes, turnips, rutabagas...They get root maggots. Anyone know an idea to combat them?
     
  6. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    BlessedMom, that all should help. The larva like undisturbed soil - lawns and sod - so anytime a sod area is converted to garden you are almost guaranteed to have them. The more disturbed the soil is, the less larva you get. If the pigs were cleaning up root veggies I'll bet they ate a lot of wire worms too.

    Island, sorry I don't know anything about root maggots, we don't get them here.
     
  7. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

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    I think that is exactly what I am getting too.
    My father in law said to use diazanon (SP?) in the soil before planting. That was outlawed about 1 1/2 years ago. UG!
    The feedstore guys said maybe use Sevin? But it doesn't say anything about helping with root maggots or those wormy things.
     
  8. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    There is a product out for controlling grubs in the lawn. It's called grubex and it works well.

    If you are all organic this won't be for you.
     
  9. bowdonkey

    bowdonkey Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have had problems this year with maggots in my turnips and rutabegas. Will putting the roots in the compost pile just keep the problem going for next year. What precautions do you all take to minimize them? All of my gardening books say to use Diazanon when you plant. Any drawbacks?
     
  10. SquashNut

    SquashNut Well-Known Member

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    Fall crops do better than spring ones.
    wood ash sprinckled around the row will help.
    It will get better as your garden spot gets used for more years.