Worming Questions

Discussion in 'Goats' started by dcdalton, Sep 14, 2004.

  1. dcdalton

    dcdalton Active Member

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    Location:
    Washington
    I am planning on picking up some dairy goats next spring and have been hanging around here learning from all of you. I have seen several people talk about worming their goats and I have a few questions about it. How can you tell when they need to be wormed? Is is something you do on a regular basis for preventitive reasons or just when needed? Where do you get the medication for worming the goats? Thanks in advance for your help.
     
  2. dscott7972

    dscott7972 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    People have different philosophies on worming goats. As far as where to get it, Co-op, Tractor Supply and the best is a large animal vet.
     

  3. dcdalton

    dcdalton Active Member

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    Great. Could some of you share your worming philosophies with me?
     
  4. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    NC
    I believe those philosophies run the gamut from worm regularly every (month, six months, year), to only worm when fecal results are positive. And the worm regularly folks have their own thing about When that is. Before freshening? After freshening? Not while pregnant or nursing? Natural wormers only? Commercial chemical wormers? Brand names? The "only when positive" folk have their differences on how often you should check. And then, what about worms that don't show up in fecals? And of course, it all depends on the conditions where you live, and what climate is more conducive to high worm populations, as well as husbandry issues, feed, pasture rotations, and all that stuff.

    Talk about a can of worms! :rolleyes:

    My suggestion is to do some research on all the methods, then go talk to your county extension office about what they recommend for your area, and what local problems might be. While you're there, ask if your area is copper or selenium deficient, if you haven't already done that.

    Have fun with your goats! You'll figure out what works best for you and your goats. You will. It might make you slightly crazy at first, but that'll just make you fit in with the goats better! :haha:

    Meg :) (Where's that tongue-in-cheek smilie?)
     
  5. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    North of Houston TX
    Talk about a can of worms!
    ....................................

    Love that!

    Your best bet is always a mentor in your own area. Someone perhaps you will buy your goats from and who is known for giving ungoing help. Lots of breeders leave you swinging in the wind!

    Find your breed of choice, join the groups.com at Yahoo...Nubian Talk, LaMancha Talk, Alpine Talk etc... Nubian Talk is great because there are so many of us on there, lots of opinions. But without a local mentor, descerning between all those opinions means guessing. Also, http://forums.chamoisee.atypedigital.com/index.php
    gals from Washington on there.

    Extension agents :) Hopefully yours will not be as worthless to you as mine was. Vets: I was lucky here, two other longtime breeders had already started teaching her about goats, before I even got here :) Vicki
     
  6. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Washington
    I've had good luck with my Ag extension office regarding critters. No luck at all regarding crops - just the luck of the draw.

    I worm when I notice my goat's droppings are looking a bit soft and I haven't made any diet changes. That tends to be when the temperature's been in the 70s and its been rainy. If I'm noticing one of them coughing without any signs of being sick and when it isn't dusty, I'll try worming. If the goats are shiny, bright eyed, mischievous, with no coughing and firm stools I don't worry about it.

    I used to worm on a strict schedule, but I really think I was over-medicating them. I've wormed twice this year and my guys are as happy and healthy as they can be.

    There really isn't a right or wrong answer here. You'll get to know what works for your critters and your lifestyle. As long as the goats are healthy, you're doing just fine.

    PS, in Washington you'll have to supplement copper and selenium.