worming goats

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Chuck, Oct 21, 2005.

  1. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When i worm my goats, I notice that sometimes they'll run off after they get their shot (Ivomec, sub-cue) and then lay down like they're gonna die. Then after a minute or so, will jump back up and be fine. Any idea why? Not all of them do this. Just once in awhile.
     
  2. oberhaslikid

    oberhaslikid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Chuck, you are supposed to give the injectable ivermec to them orally.
    1cc per 50lbs. 51-100lbs gets 2cc anything over 100lbs. gets 3 cc is the dosage.
    the only time I give SQ ( under the skin) is for lice.and that dosage is
    1CC SQ per 100lbs.
     

  3. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have been giving a sub-q dose (1 cc per 65 lbs. according to our local vet, it will probably differ by area and the amount of lice) to two bucks (one is now a wether) that we just about lost to lice. I noticed the first time I gave it it aparently was too close to the leg becaus they both were walking stiff legged and went over and laid down.
    This last time I gave them a follow up shot I gave it further away from the leg and they still went and acted like they were going to lay down but didn't. ctually, they each got two sub-q shots that time. banamine and the Ivomec for the 10 1/2 month old buck who had just been castrated and CD/T and Ivomec for the the other one.

    We are thinking of doing the entire herd sub-q with Ivomec since we have noticed a trace of lice on a couple of does and one of our other bucks has it pretty bad. Hadn't dealt with lice on this farm in decades. Must have brought it in with siome of the goats wepurchased this year.

    Anyways, I'm thinking it may be the Ivomec because I never really noticed that reaction with the CD/T shots or the BoSe shots I give..
     
  4. full sun

    full sun Well-Known Member

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    The Caprine Supply's Goatkeeping 101 says 1 cc of Ivermectin per 100 lbs. It also says that it is painful. And yep, one of my girls acts like it hurts and the other doesn't seem to feel a thing....

    Oh, the book also mentions giving it orally, too. 1 cc per 75 lbs.

    Jennifer
     
  5. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Orally, huh? well, I'll try that next time.

    I've never given them anything except Ivomec and, when one gets sick, Penicillin. What is a BoSe shot? Should I give it? Where? How? Why? When?
     
  6. dbarjacres

    dbarjacres Well-Known Member Supporter

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    NO, not injected! Orally is the way to go with goats. THe dosage is 1cc per 50 pounds where there isn't much resistance and if you are getting resistance 1cc per 35 pounds! This is the goat dosage, every other animal I know of is pretty standard with 1cc/100 or you can overdose (I did this to my barn cats and darn near killed 4 of them! Gave them like 4 x too much this summer and they all went blind and one comatose for a week but now are healthy and beautiful) and rabbits are a whopping 1/10th cc/pound (yes, per pound). Ivermectin orally should kill lice too. We give it to our dogs and it killed mange even when given orally. With horses, I know orally kills lice, so am pretty sure it does for goats. Pour ons do NOT work good on goats either.

    Bo-Se is a selenium shot to prevent white muscle disease in selenium deficient areas.
     
  7. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm gonna listen to my vet's advice when it comes to things like this. We give Panecur orally, which is what we worm with here. The Ivomect sub-q was for lice, not worms. It worked on Archie, too. Rudy was at a different stage so I am hoping the second round will take out what was left. She recently graduated from collee and has had goats herself. She gave us the dose according to how badly infested the bucks were.

    The BoSe is for the selenium deficiency in this area. I give it to the kids and on ocassion our calves.
     
  8. Debi

    Debi Active Member

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    Sometimes, goats go into shock after receiving a shot. Keep epinephrine handy - 1 cc per 100 lbs. You're lucky the one that went down got back up. You can get it thru Jeffers or any of the goats catalogs. It's very inexpensive insurance.

    Debi
    Kaufman TX
     
  9. Sher

    Sher Well-Known Member

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    Hi Chuck. In my youth..LOL..I raised hogs for other people. Ran the farrowing houses etc. I naturally had to give Ivomec to the sows, gilts, etc. They screamed bloody murder when I shot em. WHY? Cause it burns like nobodys business.

    I just cannot bring myself to throw it down a goats( or any other animals) throat. I have gotten it on the back of my hand in the process of years of shooting thousands of hogs...it burns.

    So I don't wonder why your goats lay down..I don't give it to anything anymore. But that's just my thinking..and I am not condemning anyone who does give it.

    Good luck!
     
  10. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, then what do you give for worming, Sher? Is there something else that works?

    When given orally, what do you do, just use a syringe without a needle and shoot it down their throats?
     
  11. Mrs_stuart

    Mrs_stuart Well-Known Member

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    Chuck,
    We use the ivomec, we do not do it sub-cue, we do it orally...
    We do use the syringe with no needle and just shoot it in their mouth...our goats so not seem to mind it at all. If fact, it is way less of a problem then the sub-cue.
    BoSe is for selenium defeciency...If you live in an area that is defecient, then you can use it...we do...We purchase it from our vet. I would talk to others in your area before deciding...you can also do a search on the web for a map of the areas that have a selenium defeicient...

    Buy the way i do know that i cant spell deficent...i am just to tired to go look it up...lol :sleep:

    Belinda
     
  12. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    We have used Ivermectin in the past. You can just get the horse paste and give it orally. It's already in the tube with the nozzle on it. Easy and cheap. Give the dose for 2x your goat's weight. If it's a 125 lb goat, go to the click for 250 lbsl.

    Now, here's the rub. Since you've been giving it sub-q, which is a less than optimal way to give it, the parasites are probably getting resistant to it. We had this problem with some goats we got this summer. The dairy we got them from was using Ivermectin injectible and as a pour-on. We tried to use the paste and it just didn't do the job because of all the resistance. This is getting to be a big problem with Ivermectin, like it already is with Safeguard. I would do a fecal after you worm orally to see if it's really working. If it's not, you might want to switch to something like Cydectin pour-on, BUT GIVE IT ORALLY. It's strong, nasty stuff, but it works really well and you won't have to use it nearly as often as you will something that doesn't really work like Safegaurd or Panacur.

    One more thing, if you're going to use Ivermectin injectible given orally, or the Cydectin orally, get a drench gun. They're pretty cheap and they make it so much easier.
     
  13. Oscar

    Oscar Well-Known Member

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    We worm sub-Q twice a season. Each time, the two older goats act like they are going to faint. They end up laying down, rolling around a bit and then jumping up normal-like. After reading through this thread, I am seriously considering giving an oral dose. We attempted using the natural wormer from Hoeggers. It was no well recieved by the goats. We tried mixing it in their food but this was highly inefficient: too little womer and you are doing no good, too much and the goats won't touch the food.
     
  14. GoatsRus

    GoatsRus TMESIS

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    Ditto to Milking Mom's advice. That's exactly how I worm my goats. They are much more healthier and have nicer fur since I got rid of the safe guard and started to use Cydectin. You need to only worm twice a year on the does as Milking Mom indicated.
     
  15. Eveningstar

    Eveningstar Active Member

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    Your goats act this way because Ivermectin stings. You can administer it either way, orally or injection. The only difference is orally won't get rid of the lice and lice can cause anemia if it gets out of control. It is a powerful dewormer much like Cydectin. It has a milk withdrawl period so follow the label if you drink the milk. I use Safeguard with excellent results (I can hear the "boooos" already) and the milk withdrawl is much less than the Ivomec (injected). Ivomec given orally has a lesser withdrawl time too. It really depends on the method which you choose to administer it. Safeguard works up here because we have the freezing temps to kill most of the worm eggs (-20deg is not uncommon). I don't think it is very popular or effective in the south because of the difference in climate. Also mentioned are Valbazen and Panacur. I have had good luck with Valbazen also and that is given orally. That is more popular as a cattle dewormer and you should watch breeding dates when using it. I think there are as many different opinions on deworming as there are people raising goats! Do fecal exams and follow a program that works best for you.
     
  16. Eveningstar

    Eveningstar Active Member

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    I forgot to mention, that I need to deworm the goat herd once in the spring and then in the fall before breeding. Like I mentioned, the freezing temps do the rest.