worming cattle

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Jan 19, 2004.

  1. Just wanting to know what is the cheapest and easy way to worm cows.
    Also is there a way of doing it without having to buy all the equipment.
    Thanks.
     
  2. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Your feed store will likely have worming blocks. They are basically a protein/mineral/deworming block designed so cattle get a small dose of dewormer every time they lick it. Some say they are more 'organic' than deworming shots or pour-ons in that it basically works within the digestive system itself rather than having to get into the blood stream through being absorved by the body.

    There are also those who say adding DE to feed and/or Shaklee Basic H to drinking water will also deworm. Clean hardwood ashes may also work.

    Ken S. in WC TN
     

  3. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I use pour on...eprinex. I use the applicator when I'm doing a bunch, but if I only have one or two, I just pour the stuff in a throw away cup or soda bottle and do them that way.

    Jena
     
  4. Tom McLaughlin

    Tom McLaughlin Tom

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    There are herbal mixes available that claim to be as good as chem.and are inexpensive to use. I'm sure if you do a search for Herbal Dewormer you can find more info.
     
  5. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    If you want to be sure of a good job use ivermectin in one of its forms, either the injectable or the pour-on. It costs no more than the other wormers and it is fast, effective and safe.

    If you have only a few animals you can sometimes buy the injectable by the dose in a syringe from your local feed store. Here they charge about 75 cents per CC plus l5 cents or so for the syringe. Takes one cc for each 110 pounds of animal.

    You can buy generic ivermectin very cheaply now from just about any vet supply house. The pour-on is very simple to use and comes with a measuring device that you use to pour a line of the liquid down the animal's back.

    Don't fall for the "fly killer" blocks that purport to cut down on flies by poisoning the cow's dung. Might keep flies from breeding in your pasture, but your neighbor will raise enough for both of you. If flies are bothering your cattle use one of the permethrin pour-ons. Five to seven dollars per season will keep the flies off a cow. Once you learn that treating half the cattle will kill ALL the flies you can cut that in half. Don't buy the cheapest; get one of those that will stay on in the rain.
    Ox
     
  6. sweetbabyjane

    sweetbabyjane Well-Known Member Supporter

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    South Georgia
    Hi Unregistered,
    Without derailing your post, I'm just wondering how effective the pour ons are.

    Usually one of the guys handles worming, but since we only had two to do this week-end it was me. :0 I was able to get the Ivermectin poured down the cow's back all right, but I wasn't able to get past the bull's shoulders. Ended up tossing it passed his shoulders and down his back as far as possible, but I know some of it just dripped off. I only had a little left in the bottle, so I poured it on his back and rubbed it in, and rubbed it in on his shoulders, too.

    I know when I worm the dogs and chickens, it's important for the wormer to actually be put on the skin so it can be absorbed. How effective is the wormer when it's just poured on the hair of the cows?

    One good thing, I guess. I won't have any internal parasites for awhile. :)

    Any thoughts anyone?
    SBJ
     
  7. sweetbabyjane

    sweetbabyjane Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi again,
    I asked my question but didn't answer yours...

    Yes, you can worm cows without having a chute. When we just have a few to do we close them up in a small lot, about 20' x 20'. Inside the lot, along one side, we set up two cattle panels, side by side but about 5 feet apart. On one end, the panels are chained to posts or something sturdy; the other ends are left moveable. Looks like this, the lines represent the cattle panels:


    __ (this end is fastened to something)
    __ (this end is fastened to something)


    We put a bucket of feed inside the cattle panels and also a bucket in the other part of the lot to keep the other cows calm. Cut the desired cow from the others and herd her between the cattle panels. When she is inside the panels, pick up the unchained ends of the panels and move them together (FAST). This will form a triangle with the cow inside. Someone will have to hold the ends closed or she will get back out. Now you can worm her or whatever you need to do. Looks like this, the cow is in the open part of the < :

    <

    Basically you are just boxing the cow between two cattle panels. Hope that makes sense.
    SBJ