working with the DEC

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mommagoose_99, Jul 2, 2006.

  1. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    We were heavily damaged by the flooding in New York State this week. Our normally pleasant stream which follows the property line, left its banks and tore out the heart of our Market Garden. The stream has left its usual banks and has cut a 5 foot deep channel across the middle of our 14 acres . We need to find an agency to help us move the stream back to its origonal channel or irrosion will affect our home and barn. Does anyone know which agency I should contact? I know we will need a permit from the DEC to do any reconstruction to the creek banks but is there any other agency that might help us? We do not own any heavy equipment and we are on a tight budget right now. The scope of the work needed to restore this property is monumental . There are about 20 trees down on the property alone. We had 18 inches of water in the basement but have that nearly all cleaned up. We are fortunate there was no loss of life in our community. Probably 40 % of the town has damage.

    Update: was just told there is not enough damage for FEMA to step in . Our tax dollars at work :(
     
  2. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    Soil and Water management - it's in the USDA subset.
    Should be listed with DEC offices in your county.

    So sorry to hear about your garden...
    That weather was vicious.
     

  3. pistolsmom

    pistolsmom Well-Known Member

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    We had the same problem in 2004 after hurricane Ivan. Called local/county/state officials, corp. of engineers, etc. Got the run around everywhere.....can't run equipment in the creek, don't have any funding, need $ for engineer studies, etc. Truth is all we need is some heavy equipment to move the creek back to it's original location and some clean up. The problem is still here and if we get any amount of rain we will flood again. Good luck!
     
  4. bluetick

    bluetick Well-Known Member

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    Mommagoose, I am sorry to hear of your difficulties. Minnikin's suggestion of contacting the Soil and Water Conservation folks seems a good one.

    Best of luck!
     
  5. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    I'm so sorry for your difficulties.
    Since gov't agencies work so slow, can you rent a tractor & at least dam the river at it's original point so it flows where it used to? Easier to say 'I'm sorry" than loose your house.
    Can your insurance company help?
     
  6. boonieman

    boonieman Well-Known Member

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    I seriously doubt there are any agencies that are going to come to the rescue. My creek erodes all the time during spring flooding, and I've tried for years to get them to assist in stopping it. Here's what I would suggest;

    -First, takes pictures, more pictures, and then a couple more. You may need them later. Hopefully, you have some "before" pictures.
    -Second, I can relate on the whole "things are tight concept. So, I'm thinkin gmaybe here's a temproary, but cheap idea maybe you can try. The twenty trees that you say are down.....drag them over into the "new" stream right at the point it started it's new cut. Put some iron tee fence posts in to hold the logs and even consider wiring the logs to the posts. Drag the logs in and lay them crossways in the "new" creek, with the tee posts holding them against the current. (assuming it isn't extremely heavy current) Any kind of rock or fill you can find to plug the holes, even hay bales can help and force it back into the old channel. Eventually sediment will form to plug it even more. You aren't actually working in on the official creek banks, at least not the old one. You really need to force that creek back before it decides it likes where it is. Then worry later about fixing the eroded property, or who will help you do it.
    -Take pictures as you go, or video.

    Very best of luck to you, just be careful.
     
  7. Micahn

    Micahn Well-Known Member

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    Here in Florida FEMA helps just about any one who wants it. We did not have any damage at all. But I know people who got money for almost nothing at all. People even got money for the days they missed work if any. My niece for because the roof leaked in the rental she was in and just a few things got damaged.
    I would say FRMA should be the same every place so I bet you could get at least some from them for the downed tree removal and other stuff.
     
  8. boonieman

    boonieman Well-Known Member

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    Florida may have a leg up since the governor is the presidents brother. I would expect FEMA to be responsive there. :rolleyes: But in the northeast where all the flooding has occured they will have to prioritize where they put their efforts, especially in the beginning. They are going to concentrate first on the things that impact the most folks or property. This makes sense. Sure, later there might be some financial assistance or re-imbursment. I assumed from the post that the home and other things were in imminent danger of damage and a limited budget to work with, so that's why I suggested at least do something because goverment help make be slow in coming due to all the damage.
     
  9. ttryin

    ttryin Well-Known Member

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    Hello,

    Sorry about your water damage.

    From experience, Boonieman is right on. Start with what you can do today with what you have. Just stand there and look at the problem and you will know what is best. Start now and make "emergency repairs" to protect your property. I was amazed at what I could do by watching where the water went each time it rained and then moving soil, etc. to rechannel water.

    Speak with your neighbors and see what people will do as a group, so you don't have to go through approaching a Federal or State agency by yourself. Telephone DEC anonymously from a payphone before you approach them with name, address information so that you can do what is best for your property.

    The pictures will help you in filing for flood damage funds. The papers in New York have been saying Gov. Pataki will make funds available, but that will be later.
    New York isn't Florida with Gov. Bush, bro of the Pres., just before the election in 2004 when GWB was running for a second term--probably turn out more like New Orleans as we have two Dem Senators!

    Bless us All!

    T
     
  10. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    FEMA has recently (yesterday) said that individuals (as opposed to municipal entities) can now get help in about 8 counties. Hope you are in one of them.
    I hope my PA county can get the same. Many people in parts of Susquehanna County totally lost everything. I feel fortunate to have been spared.
    Good luck.
    Ann
     
  11. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    Who should folks contact?
     
  12. ttryin

    ttryin Well-Known Member

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    Hello,

    To find out who to contact, start reading your local newspaper and the archives for the last week or two since the floods. Most of them have at least the main articles on line. Try this link to locate them: http://www.abyznewslinks.com/ Local newspapers are also at the library.

    Talk with your neighbors and others in the community who were affected by the floods and approach the agencies together. Contact your State representative and House representative...their offices should have something on line. Send them a constituent email.
    Contact the local office of Cornell Cooperative Extension...can be found in a Google search.

    Good luck.

    T
     
  13. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    The local paper said FEMA is going to help the municipalities but not individuals in 8 New York Counties. The paper also said MAYBE individuals will be included at a later date.
    I called the DEC yesterday and they returned my call later in the day.According to them we do not fall under their jurisdiction. We are a class 3 stream ( whatever that is). They told us to go ahead and make repairs at our own at our own expense. We went and had a long talk with the farmer who owns the land next to ours and other than giving us permission to cross his land to make repairs he is not going to do anything.
    We are not hydrologists . What if we do something and it makes future flooding worse? I bet its going to take some big bucks to hire somone to clear out all the trees and gravel to open up the channel again. Then do we replace the levy too arrgghh. So much is going on. At least the basement is almost dry again. We only need to replace some tools, the dryer and freezer. Lost one gosling due to drowning but the 100 chickens are alive andtheir eggs are feeding those still in the emergency shelter.29 dozen eggs donated so far.
    Thanks everyone for their prayers and support.
    Linda
     
  14. ttryin

    ttryin Well-Known Member

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    Hello,

    Such a great task ahead of you. I think everyone on the Board sends you love and strength for the days just ahead.
     
  15. ttryin

    ttryin Well-Known Member

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    Mommagoose,

    I hope these damages don't turn out to be something you have to bear without government assistance.

    T