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Read about it being used in England in an article in Countryside, Mother Earth News, or somewhere, earlier this year, too. Good use for all the wool that isn't good enough to spin! I don't remember the particulars about the "R" value, etc, but it was interesting. Jan in Co
 

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I was looking at a batt we pulled off our carder and thought wow that looks just like a batt of insulation. I assume a big company could make wool batts cheaper than me! It sure could use up the world over supply of wool if it caught on!
 

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and this is from Mother Earth News

Sheep's wool is a superb insulator, having a slightly higher R-value than standard fiberglass. One of wool's greatest benefits is that it insulates when wet, a claim that can't be made about many other forms of insulation. Wool is naturally flame resistant, too. Although wool can be damaged by moths, it contains lanolin, a naturally occurring oil that protects it from these insects. To further safeguard wool insulation, some individuals add cedar shavings.


Wool insulation is common in New Zealand, where sheep outnumber people by a wide margin. In North America, you may be able to purchase wool insulation batts from green building suppliers such as Planetary Solutions in Boulder, Colorado, and Eco Wise in Austin, Texas. New Zealand-based Woolhouse International produces a product called Thermofleece Natural Wool Insulation, which is sold in the United States. Thermofleece contains boric acid as a flame retardant.
 
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