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Last year I put a small woodstove into the cabin. Being uninsulated walls it didn't need a vent outdoors for air.

Now the cabin is pretty tight, floor and walls. Not 100%. But we tried.

Any idea if I need to bring a 2" or whatever sized pipe to the outside now?

And if I don't, is it a safety concern? Or just makes it easier to draw when starting it up?

Thanks!
 

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You want to bring in outside air to use in your burner.If you don't then you will be burning the air you are heating. If you do this it is still drawing in outside air thru cracks etc to replace what you are drawing out of the house to use in the burner. Make sense? Best I can describe it.

Wade
 

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Most houses aren't anywhere near "air tight" so it's normally not a big concern.
Try using the stove as you always have.
If there are issues you'll soon notice, at which time you can install a duct near the stove.
 

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My cabin is insulated (walls, floor, and attic are all insulated). We used 4 mil plastic on all walls, floor, and ceiling as a vapor barrier. Double pane insulated windows and insulated door. It is VERY air-tight. We just crack one of the windows about 1/4-inch or so whenever we are using the wood burner for heat.
 

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Yes that makes sense.
So if the house is really air tight you could asphyxiate, right?
No....LOL...I don't think you can get a house that tight.
 

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Cabin Fever,, what do you mean by " your cabin is installed" I am not clear on what you mean..
Sorry about that. I meant to write "insulated" not installed. I'll edit my post/
 

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Not sure if this will answer your question but this answer is a matter of physics.

If you are burning a stove inside the house there is going to be an exhaust of air through the chimney. In order for that air to exit the chimney there has to be air to replace the exhausted air. So no matter how tight the house is air has to be getting in or it would simply not exhaust air out the chimney. You would have smoke all over the house otherwise. So as you heat with the wood stove the air in the room the stove is in gets heated. If you have a room that lets air in through small leaks farther away, say a bedroom, then that room will likely get cold because it is letting the combustion air into the house.

We burnt wood in our fireplace for several years. The living room where the fireplace is was very warm. The bedrooms farthest away from the living room were very cold. If we put a combustion air intake at our fireplace where the fire is burning my guess is the rest of the house would get much warmer because the air would no longer be coming from the bedrooms but rather from the intake air pipe we installed. Hope that makes sense.

We are currently in the process of building soon. I was thinking of doing an inside fireplace and if we did we would have a way for outside air to be directed directly into the fireplace for the purpose discussed here. Otherwise the heated air in the room the fireplace is will just go right up the chimney defeating its purpose.

Terry
 

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Forgot to mention I was thinking of coming up with a vent built right into the fireplace wall and going outside. It would have a door that could be closed off when not in use and when open the combustion air would be directly inside the fireplace. It would need to be at the front side closest to the room so the fire place would still draft well and it may need a variable adjustment to fine tune it so you could still get a draft and not have air/smoke getting into your house. It needs to be pulling a certain amount of vacuum on the house in order to draft good and not blow smoke back into the house.

Terry
 

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A Fresh Air Intake is important if you have a Tight Home and have combustion appliances be they Gas, Propane or wood fired. An HRV (heat recovering ventilator) or Air Exchanger will not make up for air used as some would think or even suggest.

A good Fresh Air Intake will have a damper to close it off, can be powered as well... there are many variations BUT one critical & essential safety point, never ever attach the vent to an appliance, you want the air coming it at just above floor level and allowing fresh air into the building as needed. There have been instances where air intakes have been attached to wood stoves and a backdraft caused house fires... Backdrafting can occur even when someone goes in/out a door !

Google 3" Fresh Air Intake Kit or RV Air Intake Kit
Example REF: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p....drolet-escape-1800-wood-stove.1000762122.html as one simple example.

As for being too Airtight NOT being possible... WRONG ! My home IS airtight because all the walls, roof (cathedral) are foam, sealed in... floor is a concrete slab, windows are all energy efficient well sealed thermally broken units and doors are all gasketed. I have an HRV and also have to provide air intakes as I have a woodstove, 2 Propane On Demand Water Heaters (1 for radiant floor only, 1 for hot water) and a Propane cook stove. Old homes which are properly retrofitted or new builds to current standards have vapour barriers and properly sealed will all suffer air transfer issues and air management & flow is part of the design consideration.... DIY'ers often are unaware or don't care about such things until black mould, rot & mildew become a problem by which time your in trouble and this is more exasperated by using air consuming appliances.
 

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I put a Durarock heat shield, spaced an inch and a half off the wall, behind the wood stove. Before I did that I cut a 4 inch hole through the wall and put n a dryer vent. Bug screen inside the vent.

The cold air comes in the vent and hits the back side of the heat shield. This warms up the cold air. I don't have cold air leaking in elsewhere.
 

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I put a Durarock heat shield, spaced an inch and a half off the wall, behind the wood stove. Before I did that I cut a 4 inch hole through the wall and put n a dryer vent. Bug screen inside the vent.

The cold air comes in the vent and hits the back side of the heat shield. This warms up the cold air. I don't have cold air leaking in elsewhere.
Smart move.
Terry
 
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