woodstove ashes

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by perennial, Nov 2, 2004.

  1. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

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    I did read a bit on the board that you can put the ashes into the garden. It's fall, can i just dump ashes throughout the winter onto my veggie garden without worry about some of the plants reacting to that in hte spring (too acidic)? This is the year I really want to go compost crazy. Also, are ashes good for a hydranga?

    brural
     
  2. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I know hydrangea will change colors based on weather it is acid or not. I believe the ashes will make them bluer.

    I read recently that wood ashes are a good organic way to get rid of some pests (cabbage loopers?) So I'll save some back for the summer. The rest will go in a "dusting box" for the chickens so they won't have mites.
     

  3. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm sorry I was wrong:

    Here's what I found at emilycompost.com:

    How to keep those hydrangeas pink or blue: if you want them blue, apply aluminum sulfate or gypsum. If you want them pink, you need more alkaline, wood ashes or limestone.
     
  4. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, wood ashes are alkaline. I can't use them as our soil and water are alkaline (intermountain west), but I bet you could use them anywhere the soil is more acidic. Have your soil tested and you'll know for sure, and ask the tester for recommendations on how much to add, based on the test results.