woodland pasture?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by patarini, Aug 27, 2006.

  1. patarini

    patarini Well-Known Member

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    Got my first pigs, right now in a small lot, about 100 by 30 -- want to start running electric fence in the woods to give them some running/feeding room, any idea how much this would help the feed bill, and or how big an area say 3 to 7 pigs would want in the woods? All hardwoods, on a hill, could easily fence 5 acres for them maybe more or less -- does this make any sense to do? maybe do a pen about 2 to 300 feet by 8 or 900, or maybe do several smaller pens? Any ideas advice welcome!
     
  2. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    I've put Hogs in the woods didn't really see any help on feed bill,it was just cooler for them.If you have any soil you won't have on a Hillside,because of them rooting and the soil just washing away.

    The only animal that does good it the woods is Goats as far as I'm concerned.

    big rockpile
     

  3. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    patarini, I would only let the hogs on the hillside when acorns are falling. Acorns are very good hog feed and in times past acorns were gathered to substitute for corn during the winter. The hogs left to their own with access to the woods will destroy the trees over time. Just limit their access.
     
  4. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    The only way to offset the feed bill on pastured hogs is to plant pasture that is suited to hogs. If there was good enough light and proper soil in those woods, I would plant clover, forage turnips and canola throughout. If you can get good hog forage plants growing in your woods and obtain heritage breed hogs that thrive on pasture, your feed bills will be significantly reduced. With a good amount of forage and pasturing breeds, the rooting will be minimal. This is why I chose English Large Black Pigs...very little rooting and they graze like a cow. Currently, with good pasture, I am feeding two 500 pound sows and one 400 boar two small scoop shovels of grain per day. That is about 15 pounds of grain per day between the three of them (a bushel of barley is about 50 pounds if you wanted to do some math). Their weight is perfect and they are very very healthy. In the winter I feed ground alfalfa and grain at about 10 pounds each per day...more if it is cold.