Woodburning stove suggestions (small size)

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ChemE, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. ChemE

    ChemE Member

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    We are looking for a woodburning stove for our country place its 600 sq.ft. including the loft. I have found a Jotul stove that heats up to 800 sq.ft. for around $720. That price looks a little high for such a small stove, but its quality is supposed to be worth the cost.

    Do you have any more stove idea's that are great quality but at a lower cost? Or is that a forgone conclusion high quality=high cost. Thanks

    ChemE
     
  2. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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    I've seen small, steel quarter inch plate type stuff down at the local builder's supply for around $400.

    I would think such a stove would be good for at least a decade.
     

  3. Hovey Hollow

    Hovey Hollow formerly hovey1716

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    Does that price include stove pipe and installation kit? We found a nice used stove for $200 that seemed like a good deal. However, pipe and all the stuff we need to install it, heat shielding, etc. we will have about $600 into this stove. It will save us money in the long run, but definitely not this season!!!
    Just keep in mind the extra costs not included with the stove when budgeting.
     
  4. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Check out Voglesang on google. They make castiron stoves that have cooktops and will hold long sticks of wood. They have 3 or more sizes at under $400. small ones are under $200. The large one would hold enough wood to hold fire over night. You can have a small fire in a large stove, but it's not practicle to have a large fire in a small stove.
     
  5. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Make sure you buy an airtight stove. There are many cheaper new ones out there now that are "EPA exempt" which means they are not airtight. You really have to almost constantly babysit a non airtight and control it by how much wood you add (like a small stick or two at a time) Sometimes you can modify the exempt models yourself to make them airtight but dont count on it.

    Jotuls are good stove. Way back I contemplated getting one. Until I discovered Sotz airtight barrel stove kit. I am still using same Sotz kit I bought in like '83 and been through 3 barrels, one of those just because I wanted smaller size stove in present house, didnt need a 55 gal barrel. Sotz alas is long out of buisiness and I imagine insurance companies frown on kit stoves used in house though I dont carry insurance on my shack so can do as I want. Yep its safe and for my needs just as good as a Jotul. I just care about function, not looks though I dont think it looks bad. One thing to check out on used Jotul and other small cast iron stoves is whether they have been overfired to an extent where the plates inside are warped. Due to the high price of Jotuls, people tended to undersize them for their application and then overfire them to try and make up the difference in heat output. Real shame as sized properly for the application and taken proper care of they are a lifetime stove.
     
  6. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i guess my cast iron stove in the kitchen is one of the drafty ones. it has leaks but can be sealed with a silicate based sealant dispensable in caulking tubes. it was cheap in the seventies when it was purchased and over the years has been worth it's weight in gold (i bet that is true).

    it has a slider draft that leaks air but we cover the hole at night with two coins and it helps to hold a fire all night. it is oblong (rectangular i suppose) and will take a 20 - 22 inch piece of wood easily. it does use alot of wood but also has several advantages. it draws very well and making a fire is a breeze. with several feet of exposed stovepipe, it heats 2 rooms very quickly. the top has room for at least two big pots and removes to load large chunks of wood. and it is made of cast iron with the traditional black finish so marring the paint or enamel finish is not a concern. i bet in a house with a loft, it would heat surprisingly well. i bet you could find one for under $300. this could best be compared to the old drafty potbelly stoves (have one of those on the garage that needs a leg).

    i guess regulation has been increased even into how a person burns their wood nowadays. is the concern for carbon monoxide?
     
  7. cfabe

    cfabe Well-Known Member

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    I have the smallest Century one, from Lowes for $379. It's got a pretty small firebox but seems to work well. Looks like about 3/16th plate steel. It's epa certified and once it gets heated up it doesn't smoke at all and you can't even smell wood burning outside. I'm sure it won't last like a Jotul but it's not my primary heating either.
     
  8. ChemE

    ChemE Member

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    That price is only the stove. Everything else has all ready been done. We had a good looking stove given to us, but it's a smoker. Its an old Charter Oak Booster Heater Parlor stove. Also that Charter Oak was letting alot of embers come out of the flue stack on its maiden fire in the cabin.

    Are the Volzang stoves good quality? I thought I read on here a time or two, not to buy them, that is from memory and it's fleating at times.

    I was at Lowes last night and only saw a pellet stove around $1200, I'll look at a different store.
     
  9. Thoughthound

    Thoughthound Well-Known Member

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    I have a small cheap Volzgang in my garage.

    It heats well, but I wouldn't want it in my home. Too much smoke leakage at the cooking plates during first ignition.
     
  10. cfabe

    cfabe Well-Known Member

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    The vogelzang stoves are cheap, and not as good quality as the more expensive stoves. They make some old-fashioned cast iron stuff that is non-airtight and may leak smoke, like thoughthound mentioned. They also make plate steel stoves, most of which are EPA exempt because they have no air controls and let the fire always run full blast. I think they also do make one or two EPA certified models which are airtight stoves with air control, and should perform well.

    The century I have is probably on par with the higher end vogelzang stoves. The cheapest EPA certified stoves out there.
     
  11. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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    Airtight is the only way to go.

    Been running one (Hearthstone) for almost 20 years...you use a lot less wood, and can control your heat output much better in an airtight...
     
  12. raymilosh

    raymilosh Well-Known Member

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    there is a very small woodstove called a Reginald. They're either Irish or English, I think. they're expensive, but they are airtight cast iron, fire bricked, have a baffle, can be cooked on and won't overheat your small house. there are taiwanese copies of these stoves that are inexpensive and work well. I had one for years.
    another option would be to find a cheap old wood cookstove on ebay or locally. Again, the fireboxes are small enough that they won't overheat the house and they are very very efficient with wood.
     
  13. ChemE

    ChemE Member

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    Thanks everyone for your thoughts, it helps.
     
  14. Jack in VA

    Jack in VA Well-Known Member

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    I got a Jotul 602 for less than $450.
     
  15. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have a Jotul 118, I think, that we bought back in the 1970s. A great stove, and one of those things that I am very glad I spent the money--I think it was around $300, which would be equal to many times that today.

    I have had some experience with Voglesang, and I would not use one if it were not watched at all times. They are made in China, and the quality control of the castings is very poor. I have seen some that cracked during the night, and the potenial for fire falling on the floor is too high for me to want one in any building I was going to be in.

    Good cast iron is expensive, but lasts almost forever.
     
  16. ChemE

    ChemE Member

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    Jack in VA,

    Where did you get a 602 for around $450? Was it used? How old and is it holding up well for its age? That is the model we were looking at and it's nice to see if ones been holding its own.

    WisJim,

    I'm starting to lean that way about the quality and only buying it once. The price is not going to kill us, I just thought there might be other stove worth looking at the are good quality, good price.
     
  17. silentcrow

    silentcrow Furry Without A Clue

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    I have a small Quadrafire. It was a bit pricey, but burns nice. My biggest problem is that it's a bit too small for what I have to heat.
     
  18. flannelberry

    flannelberry Pure mischief

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    My advice is getting a stove for about double the heat rating you actually need. We got a high quality one that supposedly heats up to 2000 sq ft and it does not quite do it in our new 1500 sq ft house - that is well insulated, etc for the cold weather (like now).

    I wish we'd gone even a size bigger (although they are harder to find around here). Definitely pay for the quality though, that is the other thing we are really glad for.




     
  19. pyper7

    pyper7 pyper7

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    I love our Hearthstone soapstone stove. It's a nice looking stove as well as a radiant heat that's not excessive. Found mine used for $550 not including pipes. Good luck!
    Carolyn
     
  20. Jack in VA

    Jack in VA Well-Known Member

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    I got my Jotul at Fireplaces & Such in Franklin Co. VA. Works good, but doesn't burn all night. It's 3 years old.