Wood Stove<>Water Heater Combo....for Cabin???

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by fordy, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ................I was going to pose this question in the Other thread about wood stove installation , BUT rather than get "off topic" I thought that I'd just start another thread . So , does there exist a system of heating water with a Wood Stove that maybe utilizes a circulation pump to move the water to a wood stove and then back to some kind of insulated holding tank . I , haven't done a google search as I thought that surely someone Already has a system like this working in their cabin\home???thanks , fordy.. :)
     
  2. headintodawoods

    headintodawoods Well-Known Member

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    Fordy,

    I don't know about a corculation system but I do know they make water jackets for the stoves. I have found 2 and 5 gallon jackets. We are looking at using the 5 gal one in our cabin.

    \
    CHuck
     

  3. antiquestuff

    antiquestuff Well-Known Member

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    Lehmans has some info in their catalog on these systems.....there are reservoirs that heat water, and coils that pass through the firebox. gravity will move the water, there are no pumps needed. The hot water will rise without pumps, just like some older heating systems. These hot water systems were used long before electricity was available in many places...The water doesn't need to be pressurized much coming into the system either........gravity fed from a high tank/cistern should work if it can't be pumped into the system. Lehmans has some diagrams in their catalog you should look at. it is somewhere in the woodstove section. It might be helpful.
     
  4. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    We just keep a big metal pot (~5 gallons) on top of our woodstove.
     
  5. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ...............So , Can I infer here , that , when you squat down :eek: in your #3 Wash Tub , that it ONLY :p takes 5 gallons of hot water to fill up Der Tub :confused: ?? I'm also ASSuming that you don't create any...Tsunamies in DA wash Tub , IF someone rings Da Door bell , :eek: fordy... :)
     
  6. HUBERT

    HUBERT Well-Known Member

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    FORDY IF YOU WOULD GIVE ME AN EMAIL ADDRESS I WILL SEND YOU DIAGRAMS. THERE ARE SEVERAL WAYS TO DO IT.I USE ONE METHOD AND IT WORKS GREAT.YOU CAN EMAIL ME AND I WILL SEND YOU DIAGRAMS AND DIRECTIONS.
     
  7. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Fordy, I can wash two people, both with long hair, in five gallons of hot water (plus a little cold). I believe there are people here who can do better than that, too. You don't sit in a tub full of water, though. The way we did it was to heat a couple of kettles (large pots) of water, bring them into the bathroom, sit them by the tub, have a large bowl in the tub, add hot and cold water to the large bowl to get the correct temperature, and bathe with that water. Add more from the kettles of hot water and some cold water as needed. We've also done this with a washtub (helps if you are a small skinny person) and it works the same way, except we always got more water on the floor that way, as the large bowl of water won't fit in the washtub with the person. The advantage of using a regular bathtub is that all you have to do to get rid of the dirty water is let it go down the drain. If you use a washtub, you have to bail it out until it's light enough to pick up and carry. However, the washtub does have the advantage that it can be placed near the woodstove -- a cold bathroom far from the heat source is a miserable place to be naked and wet.

    As for the privacy issue, if you are the only one in the house, draw the blinds, lock the doors, and turn out all but necessary lights. Then just don't answer the door! If there is someone else in the house you can have them answer the door, if you can't be seen from there. A folding screen around the washtub would help with not only the privacy issue, but also would help keep drafts off the bather.

    Kathleen
     
  8. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Actually, I only need 3 gallons for bathing. I used a 3 gallon garden sprayer modified with a dish-rinsing nozzle (which replaced the original sprayer wand). During warm weather, showers were taken on the cabin's front porch. During cool weather, showers where taken indoors. I sat in a $12 plastic cement mixing trough (approx. 30” w x 48” l x 12”d)....not a #3 wash tub. Three gallons was more than enough water for a dern shower. I was off-grid…I had no fancy-schmancy solar collectors or gasoline generators….but I DID have a pressurized shower!
     
  9. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hubert,
    Could you describe the method, or include me on your distribution. (GObug@aol.com)

    I have studied this a little and found that systems that surround or top the fire box are not the best. These basically comprise the common systems I have found.

    What I have learned, and/or believe to be true is that the water heating needs to occur around the flue to keep the firebox temperature high. This implies something besides a straight up in the air flue, more like a russian fireplace with a circuitous flue and copper tubing wrapped around it.
     
  10. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .............gobug , I'll be happy to make a set of copies to forward to you when he mails a set to me . No Problemmo , I'll send you a PM when I get them in the mail and you can Pm me back with your home Add...fordy... :)
     
  11. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Fordy,
    Previously, before moving, I had a homemade setup as you described. I had a wood stove and around the vertical stove pipe for the flue I had a 25 feet coil of 1/2 inch copper tubing wound on the outside of said pipe. I had a water heater elevated at a height to where the coiled copper tubing bottom was at the same elevation as the drain spigot on the water heater. The copper tubing connected to the drain at the bottom of the water heater and the other end of the copper tubing was plumbed to the hot water connection on the water heater. This arrangement gave a cold water connection at the lowest part of the WH tank and an elevated temperature connection at the highest part of the WH tank. This created a condition to where when the wood stove was hot there would be a thermo-siphon circumstance and the water would circulate thru the tank ( similar to a John Deere cooling system on an old tractor that had no water pump). When the stove was not hot, the circulation would not happen and consequently the water in the heater remained in the insulated tank for future use. I did install a 2nd relief valve in the system for safety but neither relief valve ever released.
     
  12. SRSLADE

    SRSLADE Well-Known Member

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    I use a 2nd hand insulated water tank. Made my own coil, drilled 2 holes in the upper chamber of my stove over the catylitic converter. This works great but, we have'nt needed the stove full time so the water does cool down.My system is piped into the basement off the pressure valve as it does blow off a little once and awhile.
     
  13. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In my dad's garage he has a fisher woodstove with a beer keg mounted horizontally over stove....a circulator and blower hooked into the piping...its only for heat but surely can be modified perhaps with an old water heater for hot water storage with supply water line. His systems "water" is actually anti-freeze. I can try to get more info. and pics if you are really interested.
     
  14. DreamingBig

    DreamingBig Well-Known Member

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    I've done this but it's waaay to rustic on a daily basis for me! There are a few things I'd never give up, a nice long hot shower among them. Here's a link to a solution, and you'll find more under Cookstoves. http://lehmans.com/shopping/product...DUCT&iMainCat=671&iSubCat=809&iProductID=4375
     
  15. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    I hate warm beer!

    Fordy, it's a cabin right? Cabins are supposed to be rustic. My advice is to keep things simple...especially in a cabin. In the winter, when ya leave the cabin to go home, you're gonna have to drain this water heater contraption/12 volt water system of yours so it doesn't freeze. It's gonna be a headache every time you leave. While you're visiting your cabin, just carry your water in from the outdoor hand pump and heat it up on the woodstove in a pail.
     
  16. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..............It's stictly Hypothetical right now CF . I'm just trying to get a feel for how sophisticated the "Heating with Wood" technology has come since Ma and Pa Kettle . So far , I've found , with a Google search , (3) different companies that have wood stove\hot water combined systems currently available . ALL are priced from 3 to 5 k . One of the 3 is a strictly outside system so I guess you could use Radiant heat inside a cabin\home by circulating hot water as well as using it for bathing , etc . The problem with wood heat and using wood for hot water is that you can't heat the water and the Home during the Summer , which means that you would probably have to utilize propane gas to heat your water during the summer months ......OR.....iNstall a wood stove that was completely Outside the home\cabin . ALL the systems that I looked at are TOO expensive for my budget so I'll just have to Improvise . Besides , I'd rather make a significant investment in my Solar system and MAYBE JUST BATHE tWICE A YEAR . A case of Right Guard is a lot cheaper than a 5,000 stove . ...fordy... :)
     
  17. desdawg

    desdawg Well-Known Member

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    We took "cup showers" for a long time. Here is how. Take a 5 gallon bucket and fill it to about 1/2 with unheated water. Heat a stock pot full of water on the stove then mix the two to the approriate temperature. Stand in the tub or shower and ladle the contents over your body with a coffee cup. Lather up and repeat for the rinse cycle. Works great and sure feels good after a long day. It's not high tech but it gets the job done.
     
  18. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Duh...the coil is in the woodstove and the keg is for expansion/excess. Warm beer is fed to the goat....she doesnt get much my husband drinks too fast! :haha:

    In our old house we also had a larger Fisher Stove that had (2) 2 inch holes built in at factory for hot water but we didnt use it that way.

    If this is a cabin that might possibly be non electric maybe you should consider a wood cookstove with water resivoir. A solar shower unit can be filled,hung and used that way. We used to have a solar shower over the sink in our cabin to use for rinsing dishes as well as in the outide shower stall.

    We got a cute little wood cookstove at auction in Very good shape...just needed blackening and oven knob for $77. No water jacket but we dont need it...we have propane water heater, furnace, power and running water in our cabin now! But propane has gone thru the roof price wise.

    A brand new steel Shanandoah box stove can be purchased for $650 and easily cooked on if you steal a burner grate or two from a gas range. The stove will heat 2000 sq ft. 30 yo home in Maine on 5 cord wood.

    Just a few ideas.....a hot shower is a beautiful thing! :D
     
  19. blanknoone

    blanknoone Member

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    Way back when I was kid, my father integrated a wood stove with our hot water heat system. We moved before I was old enough to really get into it and understand exactly what he did. I can tell you that he built a 'grate' out of copper pipe inside the firebox. The logs rested on it, ashes fell below it, and it circulated without a pump.

    It was a big deal because when we sold the house the buyers inspector insisted that it 'wouldn't work' without a circulating pump and was a fire hazard....after it had worked beautifully for several years. We almost had to rip it out to sell the house. We sold the house in the spring/summer. My father made a deal with the buyer that if in the winter it didn't work, he would come back and rip it out for them. We got a call that winter...to say how great it was.
     
  20. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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