Wood Stove Suggestions for a Novice

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Back2Basix, Oct 12, 2017 at 2:50 PM.

  1. Back2Basix

    Back2Basix Well-Known Member

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    My wife would love a fireplace in our home, so i ran the idea of a wood stove past her and she loved the idea. Insurance agent said it would only cost an extra $96/yr.

    So I'm thinking one would look nice in the corner of our living room and I'm expecting we'll have to tile over a portion of the hardwood floor and potentially something fire retardant against the wall. Haven't called the township yet but i know they'll have requirements and an inspection

    I just have no idea what type/brand to look for. I'm sure my wife would love something with a see through door to get that fireplace appeal and I'm looking for something for wood fuel because I've got way way way too much hardwood around the property that needs cleaning up.

    Any and all experience & advice would be greatly appreciated!!!
     
  2. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    Make sure you meet UBC - universal building codes when you install it. And make sure the wood stove, along with the pipe, meets codes also. You never know when may have to sell your forever house and meeting code helps.
     
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  3. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    My recommendation as someone who has burned firewood for almost four decades is to purchase a woodstove with the following characteristics:
    • Plate steel construction (5/16” to 3/8” thickness) – Cast iron stoves are prettier, but cast iron can crack and leak. Cast iron stoves are bolted together (tops, bottom, sides) whereas plate steel stoves are welded.
    • Uses secondary combustion to meet EPA standards. – The other alternative are catalysts. Catalysts can plug and crack and they are expensive to replace.
    • Make sure the stove is firebrick lined
    • A stove with a two level top is nice for cooking.
    As far as putting the stove in the corner, consider how high the chimney will have to run vertically above the roof. A real tall chimney above the roof may be hard to sweep. My recommendation would be to put the woodstove as close as possible below the roof peak. Such a location results in (1) a short chimney above the roof and (2) much of the stovepipe/chimney pipe inside the house. Having these pipes within the house is nice because the chimney stays warmer which reduces creosote formation.
     
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  4. Back2Basix

    Back2Basix Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I'll probably do 80% of the work myself (laying stone/tile, building platform, etc) but hire a contractor for chimney & stove installation
     
  5. Back2Basix

    Back2Basix Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the advice, any certain brand better than the other??

    The corner of the room I'm looking at is almost directly below the roof peak. I also have a pretty small home (1300sq ft) and will keep my propane as primary heat source, but if a small fireplace replacement wood stove could heat my place I'd be tickled to death
     
  6. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Ours is a Lopi brand, which I highly recommend. I also understand that Napoleon makes a good stove. There are others.
     
  7. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Agree with all the above...especially the 'gassifier' technology (secondary burn)....you will all but eliminate creosote from your chimney. These new stoves are so much better than the steel stoves of the 70-80's (Bat Cave, Fisher, etc) it's ridiculous. Thing about the gassifier stoves is get the biggest one (firebox) you can...you can crank the air down so it doesn't get too hot in the room, and make the fire last longer with more load....exactly the opposite of the old stoves....too big, you couldn't get a good burn temp and they produced tons of creosote from the smoldering wood.

    And speaking of wood....cut your wood for 2018-19 THIS fall....season all your wood a year or more. I have wood cut/split/in-the-dry for the winter of 19-20 already.

    We have a Regency brand.."Hearth Heater" model.....Canadian made. It is sort of an insert, but sticks out in the room like a free standing. Has the step down top. Great stove, they make free standing ones as well. I bought an extra set of brick for it when I bought the stove and stuck them on the shelf. Looks like I'll be putting them in next year or so....so about 10 years on a set.
     
  8. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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  9. Hitch

    Hitch Well-Known Member

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    I'm following along. I noticed no one has mentioned a pellet stove yet. In our area that's all you can have. I'm not sure about the cost difference if you have to buy your own wood.
     
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  10. Tiani Heider

    Tiani Heider Member

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    My husband and I both grew up on wood and coal stoves. We added a modern Blaze King Ultra to our home, and it had to be professionally installed (with commercially installed hearth) to satisfy the home owner's insurance requirements. Check there before deciding whether you'll save a bunch by doing it yourself.

    This stove has the larger box, built in fans, and "gassifier". That ceramic item can be clogged if you do not operate the stove properly...which is: Bring to correct working conditions before closing the damper. We have replaced one, and they're nearly $100, so we are very careful to let this stove rip once per day to reach optimum temp, then dial in for comfort.

    Main area of the house is about 900 sq ft, and this stove keeps it a comfortable 78 degrees for over 24 hours for temps above zero, and 74/75 down to -20. Keeping in mind we have plenty of windows, and live in Alaska, lol
     
  11. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    OP did mention having a lot of wood......Pellets you need to buy and store in a dry place.
    Pellets stoves also require electrically to operate....

    The advantage of a pellet stove is being able to use a T-stat and auto feed.
     
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  12. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

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    Fire wood heat, We bought our home almost 32 years ago. There was a wood buring furnace in the basement that was hooked to the ducts. there is also a Ashley up stairs in the dining room in a corner. It has a split field stone floor and split field stone on the wall and counter behind it. It hooks to a masanery chimney. In 32 years we have only use it a couple of times. I replaced the one in the basement 2014 due to cracking and not wanting to weld them up of the old Southern air wood furnace plus I didn't like the grates for getting rid of ashes from the fire box.

    Got a England 28 - 3500, hooks to the duct work but it keep the house so toasty even on the coldest windest chilliest days I don't run the fan just use radiant thru the floor heat.

    As for cutting wood way ahead I used to cut in the summer and store in my pole barn Oak, maple and cherry from my wood lot and it wold be ready by moisture meter when the fall heating season came about.

    Today I am cutting standing Dead Ash in the winter splitting in the winter also then hauling to the house in the fall and burning the same year but it is standing dead stuff.

    You might go to Arborsite. com and ask for stove recommendations or to Firewood Hoarders .com. All are fire wood home heating people for many years like my self.


    :D. Al
     
  13. siberian

    siberian Well-Known Member

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    Depending on a coal source, I would highly recommend a coal/wood stove. We have a Country Charm kitchen stove. Spring and fall we burn wood. When temps drop low we burn Anthracite coal which gives us a longer burn time. Coal really works out nice as price isn't bad after considering the difference in burn time, coal can be stacked close to the house with no bugs or mess and it actually burns better when wet. Either way, wood or coal heat makes it much easier to get out of bed with old bones.
     
  14. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    There is a selection of non-electric pellet stoves.
     
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  15. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    Looked them ...Yup... didn't know that...Thanks
     
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  16. GTX63

    GTX63 Well-Known Member

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    This is the stove we use.

     
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  17. MichaelZ

    MichaelZ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The see-through door is very nice - otherwise it is just a heat source. Get a stove that allows pieces at least 21" long - some stoves have such a small opening that it can be quite frustrating.
     
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  18. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    I agree.

    Our woodstove can easily take firewood 10 inches in diameter and 30 inches long. It makes a big difference :)
     
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  19. hiddensprings

    hiddensprings Well-Known Member

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    We put one in our place and LOVE IT. I told hubby I had to have the see-through door and I am glad I did. I don't know....there is just something about the comfort of watching a fire burn. We purchased ours through a place that sold stoves, fireplace inserts, etc. They were able to give us the info on how to comply with the building codes and hubby got that all set up correctly. We did hire someone to do the pipe just to ensure it was done right.
     
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  20. krackin

    krackin Well-Known Member

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    The worst thing about anthracite is if you buy too many pallets and it sets too long, you bring in a bag and find all you have is 50# of diamonds. Hate that.
     
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