Wood stove install questions

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Matt Black, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. Matt Black

    Matt Black Out back

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    One of the possible locations for our new (to us) wood heat stove is right in front of a window in our living room. Is there any problem with this as long as all of the minimum clearances are followed? I would be measuring clearances from the window sill, as it extends closest to the stove.

    Another possible location is in the finished basement. If I removed one of the basement windows and replaced it with sheetmetal or even bricked it up, could I run my flue out that way and up the side of the house as long as I maintain proper clearance and height?

    Third, are through the roof chimney assemblies really $1000.00+ :eek: :eek: :eek: Or were my eyes playing tricks on me when I looked at that vendor's page? It's going to take us untill this time next year to save up that much. Our idea was to heat with wood to try to save money, if just the chimney is a grand how the heck can anyone afford to heat with wood? We got our stove used for $350.00, but the new ones we looked at were $1500.00 to $2500.00. With costs like those even burning free wood (except for labor) it would take us quite a while to realize any savings.

    If it wasn't for my desire to keep the house warm while flipping the bird to the electric co. and satisfying my pyromaniacal tendancies :haha: I might say the heck with it.



    O.K. sorry for the vent.

    Thank you for any information you might be able to share.
    MB
     
  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I live in Minnesota, where I can pay off the $3000 wood boiler in a couple years, so things might be different.....

    But, running the stove pipe out the window & up to the roof line from the basement isn't the best way to go. A whole lot of pipe outside, it cools down too much & you get heaps & heaps of soot oil running back to the furnace down the inside of the pipe.

    And yes, chimneys cost a lot. They need to keep the fire & bad gasses on one side, your combustable property & loved ones on the other side, and do so without fail in a very corrosive, damp, hot, and acidic enviornment. Just takes money to build such a thing.

    --->Paul
     

  3. Matt Black

    Matt Black Out back

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    I know, I know... And believe me, I want to do things the right way with this. Never having had a wood appliance before, it's scary enough just thinking that I'm going to have a fire on the INSIDE of my house on PURPOSE (!) with out jerry rigging the install to add to the anxiety :D.

    I guess I'm just a little sticker shocked and dissapointed that we won't be able to install the stove this year. Paying nearly $200.00 per mo to keep the house at 64 deg rubs me the wrong way.

    MD
     
  4. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This one needs to be answered by your insurance company. MANY insurance companies dont allow DIY stove installs. Check with them.
     
  5. Matt Black

    Matt Black Out back

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    Geez, who told you that "plan B" was to do it myself to save money? :haha:

    I'm sure my ins. co. is one of the ones who don't allow DIY installs.

    Figures.
     
  6. FrankTheTank

    FrankTheTank Well-Known Member

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    $200 a month for 64F sounds pretty good!, but then again your pretty far south of me...I'm also in the market for stove piping for a stove i plan on purchasing soon...too much "free" wood around here...need to take advantage of it....For what i've read/heard you want to try to keep the pipe straight if you can, and keep it warm (on the inside) so it doesn't create a lot of creosote...My installation should be pretty straight forward considering there is no second floor...:)
     
  7. doohap

    doohap Another American Patriot

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    I know that $200 a month can be quite steep for some of us, but if you think of it another way ... you will only be paying that much for the next year or so, then the only cost will be that of your wood, which may be free for you if you've got a wood lot on your property. Even if you don't realize the savings for several years, imagine how much you will save over say 10 or 15 years ... might make sense.

    -- doohap
     
  8. TheBlueOne

    TheBlueOne Well-Known Member

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    Begin researching the insurance issue right now. I'm insured with Farm Bureau and a wood stove (furnace in my case) is a $50 rider on the home policy. An agent comes out and takes a few pictures, fills out a form, and looks for a UL listing on the stove. It's required that it be swept every year.
    In the meantime, examine your home's insulation. The attic should be a minimum of 11". Check for leaks around doors, windows, foundation, etc.
    Be extra careful about your chimney choice. A poorly designed & constructed chimney will have inadequate draft leading to smoke in the house and heavy creosote buildup. Heavy creosote buildup can eventually lead to a chimney fire which will destroy the chimney and possibly the house. A creosote driven chimney fire burns at 2000 degrees F.
     
  9. Buggs

    Buggs Member

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    I like to have the stove in the basement because a warm floor is a warm home. I encountered a problem there. After the basement heats up, the warm air begins to rise creating low pressure in the basement which causes the wind to want to come down the chimney.

    I solved this problem 3 ways. One is I am burning outside air by piping it into the firebox. Secondly, I am blowing cool air into the basement from upstairs. Third, I have a very short stove pipe leading through a sheetmetal plate in a window opening and then into an old cast iron paddlewheel blower sucking the smoke out of the stove. The cresote never gets a chance to form in the chimney. No worries about chimney fires that way and it is easy to clean.

    However, if the electricity goes off the basement will fill with smoke. So I shut it down if I go away. I also keep a 12v battery with a 110v inverter to run the blower in case the eletricity goes off which should give the fire enough time to burn out.
     
  10. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Ahh, living simply and cheaply and being self sufficient in the country, isn't it great!
     
  11. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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  12. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    Price your entire assembly from more then one source. Here we have two major manufacures of insulated pipe. Supervent and Selkirk. I went with the Supervent because the pipe was cheaper. Only after the fact did I find out that every other part of the assembly was a lot more expensive then the Selkirk products, and the two could not be interchanged.

    Live and learn.

    Pete
     
  13. Matt Black

    Matt Black Out back

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    I just talked to my insurance guy and got some good news. They do not charge any extra for having a wood stove, they do not require any type of inspection, they don't care who installs it and he suggested if I end up putting the stove in my basement to just cut holes in the floor and cover them with vents to move the warm air upstairs! I did explain my install plan which he said sounded right on the money safety wise. He said he would have the work hired out just because it's a PITA but it was my choice. He also said they have a lot of wood burning info at the office and I was welcome to stop by and look at it anytime.

    He said he didn't believe in charging people extra money to keep warm in the winter.
    I think this is the first time I've ever got off the phone with an insurance agent and not wanted to murder someone.
    MB
     
  14. Lt. Wombat

    Lt. Wombat Well-Known Member

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    We did the windo route and it works perfectly. I used a black pipe riser and 90 degree off the stove, then the expensive supervent triple wall insulated piping through a wall thimble then black pipe off that and up.

    On our coldest nights this winter (first with the stove, Fisher brand) we have had to open windows due to the heat. One night when I got hoem really late the living room was 108.3 F while the static outside air temp was -25.

    On the new house we're having it installed into the basement with open vents betwen the floors for heat rise