wood stove adjustment - what should i do ?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by fastbackpony, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. fastbackpony

    fastbackpony Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone, this question is for those of you who know about burning wood.

    We put in our wood stove a couple weeks ago and really like it ! In all the reading I've done about it and advice from friends family etc, i'm getting a bit confused.

    We got the temp. gauge for the stove pipe. according to that under 250* is too cool, so last night i decided its cool enough, to get the fire up to the right temp. so that the creosote isn't building up in the pipe. Well, once the fire got to cooking pretty hot, i turned on the blower, and the stove pipe did get to almost 300* (which is still really not that hot overall right?) so then my worry began and I felt the back of the wall behind the stove pipe, and it felt pretty hot ! :shrug: From the middle of the pipe to the wall is about 18", which is more than the minimum. I"ve thought of moving the stove up, but then we'll be under on our 18" from front of the stove, to the laminate flooring.

    What do I do ? burn cooler and risk creosote trouble ? ? Last night i ended up turning up the blower, and turning on a fan toward the wall and it worked very well, the wall cooled off, but so did the stove pipe :rolleyes:

    Please tell me , what are your tricks, to getting the thing leveled out ? ? I like my house, and want to do this without worry.

    thanks in advance :)
     
  2. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps you have posted the info about your particular stove before now, but I haven't seen it. What kind of stove are you using? On my stove 18" would be from a Protected wall.....like are talking bare wall? We used cement board and marble under and behind our stove, over the thick plasterboard. I am a worrier about fire, having been burned out as a child, so I tend to want to be very safe. How hot to the touch are we talking about here? Did you install it yourself.....according to a code?
     

  3. fastbackpony

    fastbackpony Well-Known Member

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    Its a US Stove Company brand, (steel constructed) its the Magnolia model. Yes, we installed it ourselves, according to the book that came with it. It has a double heat sheild on the back, with a blower. You can touch the heat shield, that part doesn't get hot enough to burn my hand. The book said, 7-8" from the wall. However we though this was way too close, so we put it more like 12-13" the heat shield stick out behind the back of the stove, so the stove pipe is even farther away.

    I don't know how hot the wall got, it is not a protected wall, its considered combustable, i could lay my hand on it, but it felt like115-125? I'm really not sure? Would there be a good way to know?

    Our goal was to install it extra safe, we even talked with local people who have a stove store, and they said it should be fine.

    Does anyone know where the thermometer would ideally go ? I started with it at eye level, and have moved it down down down, now its on the collar.

    Hope i have answered your questions ok, i appriciate any and all advice :)
     
  4. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Is it single wall pipe coming out of the stove (in the house) or double???
     
  5. Marilyn

    Marilyn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you are still concerned, you might want to look into a heat shield for the stove pipe. Just do whatever it takes so that you can relax and enjoy that wonderful wood heat without worrying.
     
  6. fastbackpony

    fastbackpony Well-Known Member

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    Its single, up to the box in the ceiling, then triple from there on out the top of the roof.
     
  7. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    How warm is warm? Put your thermometer on your wall when you get the stove fired up. Ours has proper clearance and still gets warm, we use a fan to circulate and keep the walls from being too hot. We don't seem to have too much trouble with creosote. Ours goes through the wall and has a clean out though so I can see it very easily to verify this.
     
  8. jross

    jross swamper

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    Does your blower have a speed control? 300 degrees is not that hot for flue gas temp and is in the perfect range for creosote control. I agree, a heat shield between the wall and the flue pipe is the best idea. After you check the actual temperature of the wall. I do not worry about what the flue temperature is at night when the fire is banked for the night. In the AM it is well below 200 degrees on our woodstove. Bringing the fire back and the temperature up to the high range for a time will take of any deposits in the chimney. Creosote buildup can be a problem when the outlet gas temperature is constantly below the minimum 260 degrees. You can readily tell if you are controlling creosote when cleaning the chimney, if the resulting material after brushing is granular and loose at the bottom cleanout. Since you have a straight up flue, the deposits after cleaning will be above the fireback baffle. Has anyone yet devised a method of vacuuming without blowing soot all over the place? I am contemplating running a 2 inch hose from the wet-dry vacuum exhaust out a window.
     
  9. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    The required clearance for single-wall stovepipe to combustibles is 18 inches. Yes, the wall will feel hot but it shouldn't feel so hot that you can't keep your hand on it. Combustibles...like wood...have to be pretty darn hot before they start smouldering...too hot to touch. If you have 18 inches of clearance, I would not worry about it.
     
  10. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    I agree.....it dosen't sound to me like you have anything to worry about. I have heated with wood most of my life. The wall behind our old Vermont Casting use to get pretty hot and worry me occasionally. I used it for almost 20 years and it never caught fire :) What I have now is a wood cookstove and that puppy puts out heat enough to heat 1600 square feet.

    For creosote control my Amish neighbors said to really fire it up hot, like with newspaper and cardboard, EVERY morning. It has been working. Basically what you are doing is burning out your accumulation daily so you have a nice clean pipe. I have a clean out outside for the triple stainless steel pipe that runs through the wall and up. There wasn't much there after weeks of low fires.
     
  11. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm only asking because you stated it a bit odd - you say the stovepipe is 18" away from the middle of the pipe. How do you mean that? Do you mean the closest any part of the pipe surface is to the wall is 18", or do you mean the center of the pipe is 18" away from the wall, making the pipe surface about 12" away????


    Just making sure. :)

    --->Paul
     
  12. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    If you are really worried, hang a space blanket over the wall behind the stove. Just staple it to the wall so it doesn't flap in the breeze. Then next summer cover the wall with tile or stone. Kind of hard to do that kind of work in winter with the stove going. I have put aluminum foil over a wall when I was uncomfortable with clearances and the wall behind the foil stayed cool.
     
  13. fastbackpony

    fastbackpony Well-Known Member

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    rambler - good question - the diagram in the booklet that came with the stove showed it as 13.7 from the middle of the pipe to the combustible wall, as the minimum clearance. I just went and remeasured, and from the edge of the pipe to the back wall is 15" - so i'm well above the clearance recommended.

    the wall feels hot, I am able to lay my hand on it and hold it there without burning my hand at all, i have a small thermometer, that if i can get a battery for it, i'll stick it to the wall and see how hot it gets.

    thank you for all the advice - it really puts my mind at ease - i must just be a worry wart, but i want to do it right or not do it at all. :)

    i'm leaning toward cranking it up a little hotter maybe twice a week, running it slow during the other times, and cleaning the stove pipe evey spring or fall, religiously. does this sound reasonable ? ?
     
  14. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    If you have a double wall pipe those little thermometers are inaccurate. Mine came with directions to place it on top of the stove instead of the stove pipe if it was double walled. Perhaps you have a similar situation?
     
  15. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    Although it sounds like you are complying with the manual, CabinFever's post suggests 18' from edge of pipe to wall is the standard. It sounds like you might be okay, but you might be a little close. You could easily install a sheet metal heat shield with 1 inch spacers on the combustible wall, and then you would truly have peace of mind. better safe than sorry...
     
  16. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    simple heat sheilds on the backside of the single walled pipe will do the trick. heat shields can be attached/fabricated anywhere you are worried about things geting to hot.
    if you put tripple wal from the stove to the cieling you will cheat yourself out of alot of radiant heat.
     
  17. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    If you can lay your hand on it then its not too hot. Paper has a ignition temperature of about 400 degrees. Most things are higher than that. Anything above about 95 will feel hot to your hands.
     
  18. fastbackpony

    fastbackpony Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone - i could skootch the stove away from the wall some, to get closer to the 18" - my fear is that i would be getting closer than 16 from the front of the stove to the pergo/laminate type flooring. (the book says 18 there) the floor doesn't get hot or hardly warm at all.

    At the moment i have a box fan pointed toward the wall, just in case the wall feels extra warm, we can turn it on. I know for a fact the wall is no where near 400* the stove pipe itself hasn't gotten over 300.

    the wood heat sure feels good - :)
     
  19. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Remember that a fabricated heat shield cannot be tight against the wall it is protecting but must be at least an inch away from the wall. The space is necessary to allow air circulation to carry away heat and cool te heat shield. Short pieces of pipe or conduit or copper tubing (all metal of course) or old porcelain fence insulators will work as spacers with the screws passing trhough the spacer.
     
  20. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    The clearance the company wants in front of your stove is based on the possibility of embers or burning logs coming out of the front of your stove when you open the wood stove doors and the possibility of these items starting a fire. The 18" clearnace of the stovepipe to combustibles is based on the hot stovepipe causing the nearby combustibles to reach the temp of spontaneous combustion.