Wood siding weather protection....??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by greg273, Oct 19, 2005.

  1. greg273

    greg273 Well-Known Member

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    Anyone here ever use roughsawn lumber for siding? I'm going to be using some white oak milled from a tree on our property, and I am not sure what sort of stain or varnish I should use. I used some linseed oil on some exposed 2x6's (white pine) two years ago, and they took on a rather unattractive 'gummy' black appearance. Seems like the linseed oil oxidised or attracted filth or something. Anyway, I just wanted to get a few opinions on this subject, thanks!
     
  2. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This was common years ago. It was done in a shiplap style and is very effective. It is difficult to paint rough sawn, but can be done. I would use a spay on stain sealer, probably two coats would be necessary.
     

  3. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I just use new motor oil mixed with paint thinner---thinned it enough so i could spray it through a pump up sprayer(app 1/2 pint thinner per quart of oil)--The wood just soaked it up. I didn't want used oil because it makes the wood darker. I am sure it will have to be re-done every year or so, but it still looks good after several months and no noticable smell after a few days. The wood I didn't spray is a lot darker than the sprayed wood. Works for me!! Randy

    PS There is All kinds of finishes you can use that will work. I would not want to use a High Gloss varnish, but My dad had his rough sawned siding sprayed with a stain mixture with a small amount of Varnish added in the 1970's, it worked real good. A neighboring house that is app 100 years old still looks ok(a few bowed boards) and I know it has not had anything sprayed on it in 50 years----just the grey board look.
     
  4. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I use Sikkens stain on any non painted exposed wood on my place. Expensive but quality stuff that lasts a very long time.
     
  5. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    White oak is naturally weather resistant. The grain is plugged with a membrane callled tylosis ( or tyloses ) which makes it water resistant.....and why white oak was the preferred wood for barrels and roof shingles.....I've seen white oak shingles off 100 year old cabins that looked just fine.

    You really don't need any preservative and the wood will gray out over time. If you want something that looks better in the meantime, a stain like Olympic or Sherwin Williams Wood Preservative stain in gray will color the areas protected ( like under a roof overhang ) that will gray out last, and let the natural greying "blend" in over time.
     
  6. greg273

    greg273 Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the replies... Andy, I like what you said there, as I was leaning towards NOT applying anything to the wood. I chose white oak after tons of research into this, and I feel pretty confident that I can get many years of useful life from these boards. Although I hated to take down that tree, it was a huge 100+ year old tree with a decided lean over the roadway, and I figured, well, take it down now and use it, or let it fall over the driveway someday. So I've got hundreds of board feet of 10"wide by 5/8" thick boards air drying in the shed. I painted the ends with linseed oil, to prevent splitting, but I've noticed some splitting anyway. Not too bad though, and they all seem to have stayed pretty flat, no cupping as I was concerned about with them being so wide and only 5/8" thick. And the price was right too! The sawyer charged, i think, 10cents a bdft. A great bargain if you have the trees to spare, and the money stays in the local economy.
     
  7. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    To make the oak last over 100 years without any finish, you'll need to place the boards up and down so the water runs down and off the boards. When you nail the boards up, they will shrink about 6 to 10 percent depending on how long they were air dried. To make a good wall they put 2 inch wide firring strips over the cracks. There are barns in southern Ind way over 100 years old with the original siding still on them. If the boards are run crossways the water gets behind them and causes rot where it can't dry out quickly.
     
  8. poppy

    poppy Guest

    If you want to keep the wood the original color, I use Clear Wood Finish ( CWF ) made be the Flood company. Lowes carries it here as do some farm stores. About $16.00 a gallon. Sprays on well unless you buy the one with UV protection. It is too thick. I have an oak barn about 12 years old and have sprayed it 4 times over the years. Looks like it did the day they put it up. I like the oak grain showing, but aging gray wood looks good too.
     
  9. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    My new hen house is untreaded pine boards, 10 cents a foot. No plans on painting it....