wood heat for mobile home

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by farmergirl, Dec 26, 2005.

  1. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Any suggestions for adding a woodburning or pellet stove to our master bedroom? The house is a 1985 doublewide mobile home. I want to put a stove in the corner of the bedroom, which shares an exterior wall, facing the front yard and directly next to the front porch. How would we go about installing the stove and the chimney pipe needed? Are there special risks/ challenges with installation in a mobile home?
     
  2. mountainman_bc

    mountainman_bc Well-Known Member

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    Yes there are certain specs you need to follow. If it is new it will explain the details in the manual.
    People around here have little stoves in their vans, RV's etc, however I would be worried about fumes and fires.
     

  3. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Wood stoves in a mobile home is just asking for disaster.Think of some other,safer,kind of heat. You obviously have a different kind of heat now. Stick with propane or NG, or elect.If you don't know anything about wood stoves, you should really forget it. They may seem Romantic & Nostalgic, but they are really dirty, dangerous, & inefficient. When you bring the wood into your house you also bring in insects, including cockroaches.Buy a nice vented gas stove or fireplace with fake logs,untill you can have a home that is designed for a wood stove or a fireplace.You are probably going to hear about how wood stoves are perfectly safe in a mobile home from several people here.Think about how you are going to remove the HOT ashes from your stove.
     
  4. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I've lived in mhomes with wood stoves and know many people who also do so. You will need to add some drywall if you have paneling and put something like brick facing or ceramic tile over that. You will need to put a hearth under the stove as well. Brick or tile. Extend it out in front of the stove a couple of feet for safety. If you are in an area with building codes requiring a permit you will need to check with the building dept. Otherwise do a standard installation of the pipe. I won't go into detail because you can find out plenty just google 'installing wood stove pipe'. Follow standard procedure for clearances from the drywall and you should be fine. Be sure you have fire alarms and CO alarms just like with any heat source.
     
  5. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    Do you have homeowners ins. ... ?
    You might think about asking what the rate increase would be with a "wood stove".
    Maybe you'd want to be sitting down when you hear the answer.

    Tis the time of year when far to many people are burning themselves and their homes down ---(and not just mobile homes)------from improper use of a wood stove.


    The above might be negative sounding ... but its all true
     
  6. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    There are woodstoves and pellet stoves approved for mobile home installation. That is what you will want to get. Kim is right, you will have to put a heart under it and, I believe, you also have to permanently install it to the floor. There are also certain specifications, in terms of the venting. If you google "wood stove" and "mobile home", or "pellet stove" and the same, you will get an idea of what's approved for MHs and what's required for their installation in a mobile.

    Yes, you do want to be careful --- in particular, many of the cabinets in mobiles are made of a very flammable material, so you'll either want to replace them or make sure the fire is very far from any kind of cabinet. Later mobiles used cement board or whatever it's called around furnaces, etc --- you might want to think about putting that in, too.

    This is something I thought of doing, but I quit smoking and saw absolutely no reason to undo quitting smoking by installing a woodstove. Plus we just don't get cold enough long enough here for me to justify the costs. Besides, pellets have proven to be hard to get in this area, and the pellet stoves require electricity to run, so what's the point?

    If you decide to try something other than a wood or pellet stove, stay away from the ventless fireplaces! I researched them and they're just nasty.
     
  7. 2togo

    2togo Member

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    My husband and I were just considering doing the same thing. Granted, we only have a single wide 28' trailer, but the woodstove would actually make the place too hot. And then, they don't hold heat well, so we'd be back and forth between freezing and sweating. Mobile homes and trailers are, in general, dangerous to heat, because if it happens to catch fire, it goes up quickly...very quickly. We decided to go with a space heater of some sort, either propane or kerosene. If you do decide to go with the woodstove, which may not be such a bad idea, because your home is bigger and you have more room, make sure you have a good firewall (I'm pretty sure Cyngbaeld is right on) up against the wall it will be backed up to, and any other subsequent walls in the near vicinity.

    P.S. This may sound wierd, but if you try cooking on the woodstove at all, will you write me at this name and let me know how your experimentation has gone? Thank you kindly.
     
  8. flowerpower

    flowerpower Member

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    The majority of the homes here have some type of stove or fireplace for heat.I have friends who have them in both single and doublewides. They are always in the living room . I would not suggest putting it in the bedroom. It would be inefficient- the heat won't really circulate. And you will pay more in homeowners insurance.

    If you have to remove hot ash or coals, you just put them into a metal bucket with some water in it.
     
  9. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    I have a double wide with a wood stove. Yup, I'm one of those who has and thinks it's great.

    1. they're made to heat various size homes.
    2. there are some made just for modular homes.
    3. Look up your county code to see how to install.

    I followed code, have tile on some kind of backer cement board 1' away from the wall and feel very safe.
    Cold (from the night before) ashes are collected into a metal bucket & taken to the garden.
    Very little smoke since I was taught how to start a fire correctly by Cabin Fever and others here.

    Sure is nice to sit in the recliner next to the hot stove watching the dancing flames and reading a good book on a cold night. Of course with my faithful dogs lying at my feet. :sleep: :sleep:
     
  10. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    I have a wood stove in a mobil... 2 mobiles in fact.

    now... putting one in a bedroom, the size of a mobiles bedrooms... I dunno.
    you might wanna put it in the living room and let the heat flow back to the bedroom with a few straticly placed little fans.
     
  11. Linda H

    Linda H Missouri Ozarks

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    We put a pellet stove in our double wide (1385 sq feet) home. We put it in the den and it kept the whole place warm. Pellet stoves are approved for mobile homes, with the hearth as someone else said. the outside of the pellet stove is cool enough to touch. (our old cat slept on top of it, and another slept in a basket that was on the hearth. Pellet stoves work by a fan pushing air over a metal plate that is heated by a small fire. You can (on most brands) pay a little extra for a thermostat and the stove will work just like any other stove.

    The stove pipe on a pellet stove is about 2-3 feet long if you go thru an outer wall.

    We were living in california at the time and there was no affect on our insurance rates. In california there are no "wood" stoves that are approved for a mobile home. I don't know about other states.

    It droped our power bills from 180ish a month down to 55.00 per month. Pellets were 135.00 a ton and we got by with a little over a ton each year.
     
  12. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    You obviously know nothing about heating with wood. Then again, anyone who has any experience would realize this immediatly.

    Pete
     
  13. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Farmergirl-------------If you install it with safety in mind and pick a safe wood heater------------It Will Be Fine-------I put a wood heater in a 8x32ft camper------It works fine, had to put up some heat shields, but thats part of the safety. Get a Air tight wood heater--no cracks, if its to close to this wall or the ceiling--------using a heat shield will make it work fine. If you don't get a air tight heater----one that you can close the draft and the fire will go out---You will be looking/asking for trouble if installed in a close/tight area. Vogelzang's little wood heater is not air tight enough---stay away from it in a small home. Now you just need to decide which one to install and how to do it safely. We will help!! Randy
     
  14. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Sorry Pete, I've had 50yrs experience with wood stoves & fireplaces of various kinds in various houses,including mobiles. Wood stoves are dangerous, especially in mobile homes. That's what I know.
     
  15. cherig22

    cherig22 Active Member

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    This one confused me, does a woodstove make you want to smoke, or do you mean the smoke it creates would make you want to smoke? Because the smells are different.

    Cheri
     
  16. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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  17. manyhorses

    manyhorses Member

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    I have a woodstove in my mobile and I love it. Depending on the state that you live it, it needs to be inspected. Here in Washington, L & I does it, don't ask me why. Anytime a hole is cut in the skin of the mobile, they need to know about it. Also, will you ever be selling it? If it is not certified, the bank will probably not lend on it. Just a couple of things to think about.
     
  18. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds like you're letting your personal opinion get in the way of good advice on this one. My double wide came from the manufacturer with the fireplace installed. I'll be adding a second one or a wood stove next year for the other end of the house. Wood burning dangerous?? You are correct. Then again water is dangerous too if it is over your head. Mud is dangerous if it comes sliding down the hill and buries your house. Natural gas and propane are dangerous if they leak into you house or explode. I won't even start on how dangerous electricity can be if you touch a wire or it overheats at a connection. Well you can put me down as a gambler---I'll keep using my fireplace, water, electric and gas. I'll pull the tags off my mattress and I'll eat right in the pool, much less wait an hour. I'll chance having a mudslide bury me, an earthquake rattle me and a meteorite land on my lazy boy. So will all of my neighbors. I am, one wild and craaaazy guy.
     
  19. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Many old timers that have heated with wood for years will not have natural gas or propane run to their house as it's a flammable gas that can cause explosions.
    Just about every form of heat is dangerous if not installed properly, after all most use a flame inside your house.
     
  20. rider

    rider Well-Known Member

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    we have a blaze king in the living room of our 28x70 modular the only thing insurance wanted besides the z-brick and hearth was that it is 36 inches out from wall, we heat almost entirely with it burn 6-8 cords a winter whick is sept to late may the only time we let the furnace run is if it is -10 or colder at night as the furnace pipes run with the water pipes and prevents freeze up, but letting the water trickle works too. there is nothing better than wood heat, burn mostly cottenwood, but mix with pine and cedar have to watch the pine and cedar as they become very hot fires very fast where cottonwood is a very even heat.