Wood fence posts

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Cabin Fever, Apr 28, 2005.

  1. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    We are planning to buy a couple dozen wood fence posts for our garden. The posts are 3" diameter x 7 feet long. They are pointed on one end.

    Now I have pounded plenty of iron T-posts in my day with a manual post driver. My question is, can I drive these wooden posts into the ground with a larger manual post driver? Our soil is just sugar sand with no rock or clay.
     
  2. terrythetaod

    terrythetaod Well-Known Member

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    I live in Florida, and I've pounded various other pieces of lumber (a sharpened 2x4 for example) into sand. Sometimes you splinter the top of the wood, but I would think that driving a round post with a round post-driver would minimize that problem. I say: go for it!
     

  3. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    they are designed for use with a mechincal driven post pounder, but since you dont have one I would sugest a post hole digger and then tamp the lose dirt back in around the post,
     
  4. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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  5. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    I did one on a bet in my younger days. Wouldn't even think of trying it again. You can dig and tamp with less effect in less time. If you dig and tamp be sure and cut the points off or they just rise out of the ground as you tamp.
     
  6. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Cabin Fever before I ever bought Metal T Post,I put thousands of Wooden Post in these Hills,Hollers,Rocky ground,never dug a hole.Punch a little hole out with Rock Bar,took Post Maul,picture below,pounded that sucker in,all it took was a strong back and a good swing.Them Post were solid when I got done.

    [​IMG]

    big rockpile
     
  7. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Pounding in sharpened wood posts is the common way wood posts were installed before metal posts and attachments for tractors. The best driver is a maul made from wood, kind of like something Fred Flintstone wood use. Of course certain types of wood make better mauls and I can't remember what works best, I would bet Ash or Hickory.
     
  8. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    So what most of you are saying is that something like shown in the photo below will not work? Humpffff! I pounded in my sand point well (2 inch diameter) to a depth of 25 feet with no problem. Do ya really think it will be to big a hassle to pound in my 3" pointed fence posts? I don't want to rent a driver if it won't work.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I spent a lot of summers pulling out the rotted stump of an old post, & pounding in a new sharpened post into that hole. Works fine if you can swing a maul. We would drive the hayrack next to it, stand on that for height. I never saw a post pounder sized for wood posts like you have in the pic, I would imagine that would work as well.

    If using a maul, the helper holding the post needs to understand flying splinters, and _NEVER_ put your hand on top of the post. My uncle & his son were pounding posts, son thought they were done & leaned his hand on top of the post to see if it was solid, unkle gave it one more swing. Amazingly, hand was only stiff for a few days, but my unkle said he woke up shaking a few times that night, dreams thinking on it.....

    You want to start a hole, shovel or something & get 6 inches or more deep. In the right soil, it should work.

    Dad also pushed them in with a loader - again, the helper holding the post needs to understand splinters & such.....

    --->Paul
     
  10. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    CF, just tap 'em on is with a big hammer (I've got a 15# hammer that drive about anything). I too have driven a few sandpoint wells, and think that that type of driver would do a bang-up :haha: job.

    Keep 'em plumb, and Good Luck!
     
  11. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    I use a four-pound big round-headed hammer to pound in my metal fence posts but use 4 x 4 posts for the corners and always dig a hole with post hole diggers, then quick-crete them in.....when we had smaller cedar posts which I used for a big dog fence I hand dug them as well with the post hole diggers...

    I just can't seem to use one of those big post hole thingies like is shown in that photo! I am nearly 53 years old and about 5 ft 5 inches tall and somehow just can't handle that by myself....husband is usually too busy to help so fencing is usually my job....he does help me stretch the fencing some times but I've gotten pretty good at stretching it using my lawn tractor or the bigger tractor!

    Sounds like you got a good deal on the wooden posts so I would think pounding them in your kind of soil with some sort of round-nosed hammer would do the trick. best wishes!
     
  12. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I missed the 3" diameter you should be able to pound them if you want,

    I was just thinking about what we use for line posts and the smallest we would even think of using is 4" to 5" posts for the line posts (barb wire fences), and the corners we use usually 8" and with out a mechanical pounder that would be a lot of work, if even possible,

    but your 3" post, should work,

    Yes if you can make a pounder like the one in the picture that should work well add some weight to the top end, a maul should work as well but the possibility of splitting would be greater, make a cap to put on top of the post can help to pound on to help keep it from spliting, if you use a sledge hammer,

    but sugar sand should dig easy as well, and tamps fast, if you deciide to dig,