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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have a wood cookstove that they actually use to cook and heat with? I have been researching and am hoping someone can point me in a direction. Figure the more knowledge, the better.

We have plenty of wood, and I'm sure the heating part would be fine. Just wondering about the cooking part. I am quite sure there is a steep learning curve with that. I use my microwave more than anything, but pretty sure if SHTF that won't be an option.
 

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We have a Kitchen Queen 480. My wife loves it.

[image]https://cdn3.volusion.com/nvzdo.wbe...chenQueen480-8.jpg?v-cache=1624368873[/image]



 

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My parents have my grandmother's stove in their dining room. They heat with it, but it doesn't reach the full house. They don't cook a lot with it, sometimes a roast or boiling stew/water. I'm not sure on the model, I'll have to check!
 

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A cook stove Dosent really throw a lot of heat and it won’t burn for a long time .
The fire box is small and you have to keep putting wood in to make good heat .
If you burned coal in one the heat is more even and you can get a better burn time .
You can cook on any stove really
I have a box stove at the cabin and I can cook any thing on top of it .
The stove burns 9 months a year .
Some times I have 4 pots on the stove at once cast iron is really good but I use regular pots also .
 

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This is almost like the one we had that came with the kitchen in our "new" home in 1947. Lots of tasty fried wild and tame rabbits, pork roasts, chickens, fried potatoes, and pies and cakes and cornbread and biscuits. Dad would put fresh kindling in it before he went down to the barn to do the morning milking and Mom would get up to start his coffee and fry up the bacon and eggs. She got pretty good at it, she could position the pot just so, that by supper time we could have beef stew or ham 'n beans, or chicken and noodles. She could regulate the oven temperature by choosing the kind of wood for a long burn, and by using the upper damper and the little round one on the fire chamber door.

Seems to me that a coal stove could also burn wood, but not vice versa; the width of the slots on the grate had to be able to let a coal "clinker" pass through--especially since we burned the cheaper Indiana coal which tended to make a lot of them (which we put on our driveway). As I recall, the stove top left chamber was for frying and regular meals, and the bottom left held the bigger chunks or logs for a longer burn. The two warming ovens on the top were regulated through a diverter damper in the upper stovepipe, On our Kalamazoo, the right hand side had a deep water warmer instead of the extra burners and burning tray. That warm water was used in the washtub on Monday, and on Saturday night the washtub sat on the floor in front of the stove, for you guessed it, our Saturday night baths. Being the youngest at the time I was the last one in. Oh, the soap scum.

Mom never tried canning on the Kalamazoo, it was already hot enough during those August afternoons, just cooking up our suppers. And, living on a cow, pig, and chicken farm--with an outdoor toilet to boot, it was a major job just keeping all the flies out of the house. I got yelled at every time I ran thru the back door. After supper, she would take out the handheld tube pump sprayer after the dishes were done and go about spraying the flies. Thank goodness for DDT. :)

Notice the Ebay price. To think, when Mom got her new electric stove in 1953, I broke up the cast iron pieces and lugged them to school for a Korean War scrap drive.

geo
 

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My tertiary heat source is a 1950's Home Comfort that was used in a logging camp until 2000. I cooked a Thanksgiving meal on/in it years ago and the first year before the house was insulated it helped with heat.

My primary heat it's provided by a momma and grandpa Fischer heat stoves. I cook on both of them and it's easier. You can even bake on a heat stove, I use a turkey roaster with a cooling rack on the bottom.
 

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Vermont Castings wood stove if you can find a used one like we did. ($50) We have the Defiance model top or front load. They have a flat cooking service on top. Can heat 1200sq ft and we warm, cook food all winter long. Oh, perks coffee and warms our tea. We even boiled a 1/4 moose bones with it. I tell ya that was some mighty fine broth.
 

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I did a side by side comparison test. Getting up in the morning, I timed how long it took to make my morning cappuccino. From the time it took to light the match till the first sip was 10 minutes with my little propane camping stove. From lighting the match, the woodstove took 44 minutes. Sorry, but that's just too long for me to stay bleary eyed.

I found that with a 5 gallon tank, the camping stove could be fueled for weeks/months, and is what is really ideal for the summer months. I now use my woodstove only in the middle of winter when I need to take the hard chill off the kitchen.

BTW, I finally got the previous owner's 1000 gallon propane tank plumbed to the cabin, so I installed a new, modern gas stove. I also plumbed the on-demand water heater. I'm happy!
 

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We use a Cabelas camping percolator that after our morning coffee's gets reloaded and put back on the stove to perk till the following morning. Adding water as needed. Makes strong coffee this way. No waiting for coffee to warm up. In winter our stove burns 24/7 with temps ranging from 200 to 600 degrees. In summer we either use our propane Colman camp stove or our Camp Chef camp stove/oven to make coffee. 5 gal. propane tank lasts 3 months.
 

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we use a Franklin stove for heat and put a cast iron dutch oven on the top to slow cook dinner most of the time. works great. and an enamelware coffee pot to heat water to use for tea, or cocoa. can use it for free coffee, but prefer Mr Coffee.
 

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I can make coffee with a 4 min cook time .
Great coffee also I don’t fill the pot to the top and I only use 1oz of alcohol in the stove .
I have a A titanium Stove under the pot
The brass stove cooks slower but pushes the water thru the grinds slowly for more flavor 🤗
Table Furniture Tableware Wood Cabinetry
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I am interested in a wood cookstove just in case. I want to have some reliable heat and be able to cook. Campstoves work if you have fuel and don't want to bake. I refuse to cook over a campfire, I do not like ashes in my food or in my hair and the smoke always follows me. When I was young we had a woodstove that we heated water on for a weekly bath, an outhouse and hauled water in from the well for years. Never dreamed I would have to go back to all that in my "golden years".
 
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