wood cookstove or plain wood stove?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by sheeplady, Sep 3, 2006.

  1. sheeplady

    sheeplady Well-Known Member

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    I am looking for a woodstove here in my new place. I had a Waterford wood cookstove in my other house plus a regular wood stove. (I only have space and $ for one here) .
    Has anyone used a cookstove aas a heat source as well. I have looked at Vermont Castings non catalytyic stove , with cast iron warming top, as a compromise of the two. Any input would be appreciated.
     
  2. silvergirl

    silvergirl Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    Last winter, DH and I lived in a 100 yr old farmhouse and our only viable source of heat was wood... The fireplace worked great but was not efficient enough, so we bought a woodstove for heat, then found a woodburning cook stove - an old Victor Jr - and hooked that up. What a difference! That old cookstove heated the entire house better than anything we'd used. I loved it! and enjoyed baking in it, too, although it took some getting used to! We're planning on a more modern wood cookstove for our dream home, when we do build... my only concern will be overheating!
    Silvergirl
     

  3. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Usually wood HEATING stoves have a much bigger firebox so the stove will proiduce heat longer between loading, wood cook stoves have very small fireboxes and no way will that cookstove firebox hold heat/coals overnight. Some wood HEATING stoves you can cook on the top of but you have no control over the heat factor - it's all HIGH heat = boiling pots of whatever, some wood HEATERSyou cannot heat a pot of water on because of the insulation and outer coverings. . It's hard to find a dual purpose wood burner that does both jobs well.
     
  4. harrisjnet

    harrisjnet Okie with Attitude

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    A wood cook stove will hold less wood in the firebox, but will radiate heat for a long while after the fire is out. Simular to the german stoves that have the heavy tile. We have been looking at different woodstove for an addition we are building. I am going with the Wood cook stove. Here in SE Oklahoma it will be all we need. If we were still in the Colorado Mountains I would be opting for a flat toped wood stove so I could cook on top and still be able to build a good big fire.
    Hope this helps you decide.
    Good Luck,
    Janette
     
  5. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have both...a heater in the main house and a cookstove(baby-sized) in the unheated (primarily unless cooking) sunroom. I do "cook" on the heater if just "stewing" ...try to "rob" some burner covers off a gas range if you go w/ woodstove...very useful for just warming...
     
  6. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i was thinking that as well. plus, many have the hot water tank that would help hold heat.
     
  7. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

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    Hi Kate!

    Nice to see you posting! We missed you at the gathering last weekend! Hope you can make it to the next one!

    My grandparents had both a wood cookstove in the kitchen and a pot bellied stove in the living room. As I recall, the wood cookstove was what kept the house warm all day - except on the coldest of days in the winter -- and the pot-bellied stove was only lit in the evening when it would be colder outside and everyone would be sitting around in the parlor.

    I think the cookstove would give off more heat because the fire also heats the oven - whether you're using it or not - and you can open the oven door and to let heat into the room and to set bread to rise or keep plates warm -- oh, and to trip over when you aren't paying attention, too!! LOL A wood cookstove will probably be waay too hot during the summer heat though -- but useful as additional counter space! My grandparents used a kerosene burning cookstove during the summer.

    Good luck!

    MaryNY
     
  8. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Look into the Pioneer Maid wood cook stoves -- they have a larger firebox than most cook stoves, and were designed to hold a fire all night and to heat a house. They also make the Baker's Choice, a slightly smaller version of the same stove. You can get it with warming ovens (or shelf?), and a water reservoir, and/or water jacket to attach to your water system. I've wanted one of these stoves for YEARS, sigh. They are Amish-made, and not as high-priced as most of the other cook stoves.

    Kathleen
     
  9. veme

    veme Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I ordered a new cook stove at Lehman's & I'm going to pick it up next week-end. :dance:
    I looked at the Baker's Choice & the Pioneer Maid and I didn't like them for a couple of different reasons. They looked hard to clean & I was told by the sales persons at Lehman's that they were not air tight. I will say that they are a great buy & have a very large fire box.
    Just about all cook stoves can be fitted with a water jacket for utility hot water.
    veme
     
  10. Greenhorn13

    Greenhorn13 Member

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    I too plan on heating my house with just a wood cook stove. the one I'm going to use is www.woodstoves.net/queen.htm check it out and tell me what ya'll think. I've got 62 ac. and about half of that is all hard woods. we will be moving back in dec. :dance:
     
  11. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    I have a Vermont Casting stove, the medium size version. It heats an 1800 square foot home efficiently with a hot fire and virtually no creosote buildup. We could cook on it in a pinch, nice flat cooking surface....Love the stove.....Tennessee John
     
  12. wvpeach1963

    wvpeach1963 WVPEACH (Paula)

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    Green horn. That is a really nice wood cook stove. That ought to do the trick I'd say.

    For somebody needing a stove that costs less. Try www.fourdog.com

    I got a five dog model the biggest and a water boiler unit delivered to my house with tax for about $560

    Oh and that included a small stove top oven I am using to dehydrate tomato's already.

    Pretty good deal and I got loads of refrences on the company. I just added firebrick to mu stove and stove pipe. Presto a nice 72 lb stove that will heat my house well.
     
  13. Tabitha

    Tabitha greenheart

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    we heat our house with an Amish made Kitchenqueen wood cookstove. It has a very large firebox for a cookstove. we got the small model that has a 17 gallon reservoir. It does a good job and I love it.
     
  14. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

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    Is your stove catalytic or non-catalytic? I'm looking into getting the smaller Aspen model (600 to 1,200 sq. ft.) for my place. Thanks for any info.

    MaryNY
     
  15. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Greenhorn, that stove looks really nice! Even better than the Pioneer Maid!

    Kathleen
     
  16. Greenhorn13

    Greenhorn13 Member

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    Tabitha, do you use any other kind of heat?? did you get the 380?? will it hold a fire ALL night long??
    Greg
     
  17. ponyboy123

    ponyboy123 Well-Known Member

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    I live in a 200 year old farm house, no insulation, old windows and doors. We heat with all wood heat. Nice old Elmira cook stove in kitchen, wood furnace in the basement. It takes a bit of a lifestyle change, like getting ur lazy butt out of bed to fill the fire. The cook stove will hold a fire for 4-6 hours, the furnace is good all nite but I usually get up and fill the fire sometime during the night. Don't want the wife and kids waking up to a cold house. I love cooking on the wood stove, takes a bit of practice, but it all worth it.
     
  18. sue currin

    sue currin Well-Known Member

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    About how much money does one of them go for. I need one.
     
  19. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Friend has one,I have pics of Mrs cooking on it.It is a FINE stove,and what we will buy,very good bang for the buck,and as said MADE IN AMERICA,by Americans,for Americans.

    He has the hookup for the hot water and uses it,but says the hotwater resevoir on the stove setup is useless,regrets having that.

    link to pioneer maid stove
    http://www.woodstoves.net/pioneer2.htm

    BooBoo