Wood Cooking and Heating Stove??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mommykood, Jan 8, 2005.

  1. mommykood

    mommykood Active Member

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    Anyone know of a wood cooking AND heating stove all in one? Not just the kind of wood heating stove with a few "burners" available on top, because I need to bake, as well, which requires an "oven" of sorts.

    If there isn't a combination wood heating & cook stove, what are my options available?

    My homestead will have no electricity, and only wood heat, and LP tank (like the kind that hooks up to a gas grill outside) will be available if necessary.

    Thanks so much! :)

    Jen
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    The 'Baker's Choice' claims to be able to heat a small or medium size home and is a cookstove with oven. Lehman's carries them, but you might find it cheaper elsewhere.
     

  3. Anataq

    Anataq Well-Known Member

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    There are actually many cook stoves which will heat your home as well as cook your meals. The amish made Kitchen Queen and Pioneer maid are highly recommended models. I have a picture of the Pioneer maid and the Heartland stove on my site. We have decided to purchase the Kitchen Queen even though it does not have the warming oven. This oven will heat up to 2000 sq. ft.. From what I've been told these are much more effecient ovens than the Heartland serious, and most others available.


    http://www.pawcreekhomestead.com/Home_heating_in_Alaska.html

    All the best,
    Anataq
    www.pawcreekhomestead.com
     
  4. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    Herself has a "Sweetheart" by Heartland, out of Canada. It heats our house to down to 20 degrees and lower. We have a small Jotul in the living room for when it gets to 50 to 80 degrees below freezing outside.

    Her Sweetheart cooks a mean biscuit. :)
     
  5. mommykood

    mommykood Active Member

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    Where are you purchasing your Kitchen Queen? I could only find it in one spot on the 'net: http://www.woodstoves.net/queen.htm Is there another spot where I can see it that you know of? Just wondering. :)

    Also, that website (linked in the last paragraph) states that there are "fingertip damper controls" on the Kitchen Queen. However, I didn't see any in the picture or graph they showed (these "fingertip damper controls" are located on the side of the Pioneer Maid, with wooden handles). How are the "fingertip damper controls" on the Kitchen Queen?

    Any other advice on the purchase of a combination wood heater/cookstove? Our home is 2000 sq. feet 2-story... :)

    Thanks,

    Jen :)
     
  6. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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  7. bearkiller

    bearkiller Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,

    Been using a Pioneer Maid for years. Airtight firebox, fully lined with firebrick. Incredibly easy to use, holds a fire well...one loading takes care of baking bread and little temp change on a reloading for longer bake times. Huge oven. Want to warm the house? Simply leave the oven door open. I use it all fall, winter, and spring.

    I've got a heat exchanger in the firebox that keeps the 50 gal water heater HOT in a passive thermosiphon system. I have the warming shelf and find it is very effective for keeping foods warm after cooking, warming cold plates, etc. No real need for a warming oven.

    I also have the warming tank and, given the heat exchanger in the firebox, I would not purchase that feature again. I simply never use the 12 gallons of water from the tank, but must replenish it frequently to keep the water level up.

    I simply cannot recommend this stove highly enough. And the price is quite reasonable. My neighbor has the Heartland Oval and I nearly fell on the floor when I saw the price tag. Plus it is a much lesser quality stove for COOKING and heating, even if it is prettier.

    bearkiller
     
  8. mommykood

    mommykood Active Member

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    To heat the house, I leave the oven door open? Doesn't that affect the cooking/baking? If not, why not? (Sorry for the elementary questions - this will be my first wood cook/heating stove.)

    What is the "heat exchanger" that keeps 50 gallons of water hot? What is the "passive thermosiphon system?" Can I use something like that without plumbing or electricity? We will have no running water, no electricity, and no faucet fixtures in our homestead.

    Where did you buy yours at? What was the price (if you don't mind me asking, that is :) )

    Thanks in advance,

    Jen :)
     
  9. missyinohio

    missyinohio Well-Known Member

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    I believe Kitchen Queen prices are about $500 cheaper direct from the manufacturer. I don't have their address handy, but they are in Marion MI. I know two families that have them, and there are no real complaints
     
  10. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Over here in England it's very trendy to have an AGA or Rayburn which can heat home hot water and bake but no temp settings. Also as friends say a warm place to dry clothes in this damp country! Sadly the YUPPIES getting them for their cottages have to use electric! or gas for them, but there is a solid fuel (coal) model still available. The older country people all have them from when that was the only option. Extensive cookbooks for baking/cooking in these monsters, and some city folk buy an electric cooking only version.
     
  11. Anataq

    Anataq Well-Known Member

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    The fingertip controls you asked about are in three locations that I know of, a spin damper on the front, a sliding damper on the flue on the back, and one underneath the fire box that they call the "super charger." Have heard great things about the Pioneer Maid and the Kitchen Queen. Bear Killer recommended we check out the Pioneer Maid and we are very thankful that he did. We we set on buying the Heartland Oval and were not happy about the price, but we thought is was are only high quality option, we were very wrong. The only thing people have said about the Pioneer Maid is that it's finish is a bit rough.

    Jen, You can certainly use the heat exchanger system to heat hot water for you home. The most common heat exchanger I've seen uses a coil located inside the firebox- the more efficient ones house the coil inside a steel box inside the fire box, some use more that one exchanger, the water is plumbed to a storage tank and water cirulates without electricity. You could use an old electric water heater that doesn't work so long as the tank is good and plumb to it and have hot water on tap anytime you need it. I was told that you can't expect to heat much more than 80 gallons of water with the Kitchen Queen under with normal firings.

    Good luck,
    Anataq

    and thanks to Bear Killer for the recommendation!
     
  12. mommykood

    mommykood Active Member

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    Did you end up with the Pioneer Maid or the Kitchen Queen? Just wondering - and why did you choose the way you did?

    Also, where can I find one of these "heat exchanger systems?" I see the Kitchen Queen has a 24 gallon water heater attached - does that attach to a, say, 50 gallon water heater? How is the water then pumped out when it is needed?

    Would I need more than 80 gallons heated (like you said the Kitchen Queen can heat, but not much more), or just my 50 gallon hot water heater full?

    Thanks! :)

    Jen