Wood cook stove

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mamabear, May 20, 2006.

  1. mamabear

    mamabear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    652
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2004
    Location:
    NW AR
    We are hopefully going to start building our 896 sf home this summer. We have been so fortunate to obtain quite a bit of items for the home either free or at a very low cost. We caught a huge new cast iron bathtub on sale for $70, marked down from $1200. My husband won $250 worth of lights in a drawing. We were able to pick out lights for both interior and exterior for the entire house. An instant hot water heater costs us $120, marked down from $360. And we were given a large cast iron Franklin stove. I already own a gas cook stove.
    Now my question concerning a cook stove. The Franklin stove is for heating only, but I was wondering if it would be more efficient and take up less room in the house if we traded the wood heater and the gas stove to get a wood cook stove. I've cooked outdoors with wood and we have a large bbq pit made from an old propane tank that uses wood, but I've never cooked on a indoor wood cook stove. My grandma had two in her kitchen, but I was too young to use them, but I loved the food she prepared.
    From those of you who own a wood cook stove, do you think this is a good idea or not, to exchange the two items for one? We have access to a lifetime of wood, which we've both cut before so it would be no surprise how much work it is. And it would also take up less room. What do y'all think? Heat and cook with one or go with what we've got? Is it hard to learn to cook on a wood stove?
    I hope I didn't ramble too much.
    Thanks bunches.
    mamabear
     
  2. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    My great-aunt had a wood cookstove and it didn't seem to be a big deal. The drawbacks seem to be BAKING as it is hard to control the exact temperature until you "really" get the hang of it. Also, of course, they are hot in the summer. Other than keeping a constant supply of wood available, and the extra care that you must take when dealing with FIRE etc., I can't think of any other negatives.

    I am hoping to put one in myself eventually, but they are expensive new and here aren't many around used - at least I haven't found any!

    donsgal
     

  3. liz18436

    liz18436 New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Joined:
    May 13, 2002
    Keep both of them.I have both because it is hot to cook with a wood kitchen range in the summer.You will have a back heat with the wood stove too. I heat my house with a Fisher stove for over 30 years.I do have a Stanley wood stove in the celler to cook and bake on when needed.That one is great to can on because it holds the heat, so I only have to move the canner to the right spot.
     
  4. Tabitha

    Tabitha greenheart

    Messages:
    1,751
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2006
    Location:
    Ky
    you need the gas stove, I would not get rid of it. I cook on a woodstove all winter, it is wonderful, but there are times when it is not so great, like about now.
     
  5. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    24,572
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Location:
    MS
    I grew up with a wood cookstove. My mom still has it and cooks on it as soon as the weather turns cool. During the summer she cooks on her electric stove.

    A wood cookstove will heat an 896 sq. ft. home...winter and summer! You could make do with it in the summer by not cooking as much, by cooking once a week and having leftovers, cooking during the coolest parts of the day, etc. Of course, one way to maximize space would be to have the wood cookstove and a hot plate or microwave for summer cooking.

    Mama always preferred to have an electric or gas stove for summertime as she does not have air conditioning. Personally, I can't imagine running an air conditioner while cooking on a wood stove. Your power bill would be outrageous!
     
  6. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,665
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    In hot weather you could do your cooking outdoors -- that's what our ancestors used to do. Build a solar cooker, or use the BBQ, or whatever. If I was in your shoes, for sure I'd trade off the two stoves you have for a wood cook stove. The best wood cook stove, IMO, is the Pioneer Maid, or the smaller Baker's Choice by the same company.

    Kathleen
     
  7. PLPP

    PLPP Boer Lover

    Messages:
    134
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    New Castle, PA
    Speaking of wood cook stoves what type of flooring do you need to put down for this? I am really wanting one but need to make sure I dont burn down the house. I think they are great especially when I am paying $400 a month to heat the house in the winter.
     
  8. mamabear

    mamabear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    652
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2004
    Location:
    NW AR
    I can definitely understand the concerns with heating the house up in the summer. It is going to be 104 here today and I won't be using the stove.
    I do most of my cooking outside or in a slow cooker during the summer. The stove just heats up the house too cotton-picking much.
    I'd love to one day have a summer kitchen. My mama had a smaller gas stove on the back porch that she used in the summer time. It sure helped keep the heat out of the house.
    Thanks for the replies. Judging by what I've got so far, it may seem that the concensus is to just hang with the wood heater and the gas stove.
    mamabear
     
  9. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    You can set it right on concrete and then tile around it to make it more attractive. Anything that is fire proof in case something should fall out of the fire box while you are putting more wood in or moving stuff around. If you are putting in wood floors, just make sure that there is a good fireproof covering all around the stove where anything could fall out of it.

    donsgal
     
  10. PLPP

    PLPP Boer Lover

    Messages:
    134
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    New Castle, PA

    Ok this house has wood floors covered with linolium, I was hoping to be able to put something ove rthe linolium to protect it. Will they just catch fire if they are not on something? Or is it just the stuff falling out you have to worry about. This is the one I am looking at buying.

    http://lehmans.com/shopping/product...ODUCT&iMainCat=671&iSubCat=809&iProductID=484
     
  11. Sherpadoo

    Sherpadoo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    155
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Astoria, OR
    I work for a heating company and sell wood stoves everyday. It's not worth it to skip on clearances! You definitely need to have a non-combustible surface under the stove. Linoleum is considered a combustible! It's super easy to make a pad though. Just get the clearances from the manufacturer (they're more than happy to send them to you) and cut a piece of wonderboard or concrete board to those specs. Then pic out a pretty stone or ceramic tile and put it on the board with a high temp adhesive. Grout between the tiles and you'll pass any inspection. Ususally they want the pad to be 18" in front of any opening and at least 3" on the sides, but you can check in the stove guide or your county's building codes.
     
  12. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    24,572
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Location:
    MS
    Mama has vinyl flooring over wood. Daddy built a "hearth" of brick on top of that to set the wood stove on. If I remember correctly, he crawled under the house and put in some extra supports to hold all this. He built a matching exposed chimney to run the flue up.
     
  13. Gideon

    Gideon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    460
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2005
    Had three on my front porch and somebody just helped themselves to them. We cooked on wood most of my youth and I being the oldest had the prime job of keeping the firebox filled with just the proper sized wood. About 1" to 1 1/2 inch was perfect plus a few smaller for quick heat and a few small slivers of "lightard" to kick it off fast. I built a "Papa Bear" clone with 1 inch plates,9 2" cross flow pipes,air jacket w/squirrel cage fan,and the top was heavy plate. We cooked every meal the first winter on top of the monster plus heating the two story home. Just to keep your home cooler in the summer you might want to screen in a porch for a cooking room. If you do it on the south side and use sliding glass patio doors you can extend the cooking season late in the fall. By placing it at a window you could use the heat there to help with the home on chilly morns. The passive heat from the south facing porch would help also. Enjoy that wood stove but I would keep the gas range(getting soft but it sure is nice to just turn a knob).