Wood chips and mud.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Dec 7, 2003.

  1. I have places on my farm which are very muddy. What would happen if I piled up wood chips on top of the mud and wintered some animals on top of the chips. I am wondering if I will fix the mud problem or create new problems.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    I think it will depend if the drainage is good or not, if it is dry and firm most of the time, the chips should work, but if it is wet/soft most of the time it may not.
     

  3. Some types of wood may not bee good for some animals. While I am unsure I think there is something in cedar that chicks don't do well with and I recall something about walnut and horses.

    Depending on the animals the wood chips should do OK. They work fine for the chickens and help some with the odor. I use stuff I get at the township maintenence yard left from the road right-of-way trimmings.

    Heavier animals will likely push the chips into the ground and it will be muddy again soon.
     
  4. Ana Bluebird

    Ana Bluebird Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I grew up on a dairy farm and around the barn was a mess most of the time (anywhere the cows stand around a lot). I remember my folks tried various things, nothing lasted very long, gravel did the best but it costs too much now (we picked it up out of creek beds free in those days---not anymore---it's illegal now). Improve your drainage as best you can and try the chips, just don't expect it to last a long time, but anything is better than standing in poop, hugh?
     
  5. Swampdweller

    Swampdweller Well-Known Member

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    If you have the chips, or sawdust, and you're planning to run heavy livestock on them, you'll have just about the finest blend for compost that you could ask for. Whenever it gets a little too soft, put down more chips, and let the pile grow. Come spring, the first dry chance you get, clean the whole mess out with loader and manure spreader, or, pile it where it's out of the way and let it rot to black. Either way, it's worth the trouble for the value you'll be accumulating in plant nutrient.

    Swampdweller
     
  6. Swampdweller

    Swampdweller Well-Known Member

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    Oct 15, 2003
    If you have the chips, or sawdust, and you're planning to run heavy livestock on them, you'll have just about the finest blend for compost that you could ask for. Whenever it gets a little too soft, put down more chips, and let the pile grow. Come spring, the first dry chance you get, clean the whole mess out with loader and manure spreader, or, pile it where it's out of the way and let it rot to black. Either way, it's worth the trouble for the value you'll be accumulating in plant nutrient.

    Swampdweller

    While we're on the subject, I'm even looking into a wood chipper, pto powered to pull behind a 4020 to make my own woodchips. I believe they are that valuable.