Wood burning stove question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by headintodawoods, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. headintodawoods

    headintodawoods Well-Known Member

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    I am looking for a way to heat my cabin with wood. We have found a nice wood burning stove that will be great. However when I went to our local stove store to find out how to vent the stove he told me it would cost about $600 for the pipes. I told him I didn't want to run the pipe up and out through the roof because our second floor is not so big and we have to have 6 people sleep up there so I wanted to run the exaust out the side of the house. He talke about single panel pipe ($10 for 3 ft), triple panel pipe ($74 for 3 ft) a T-box ($174). I knoe I have to double or triple panel to run through the wall and maybe double depending on close to the house I run the pipe up. but I can't afford $600 for the pipe.

    I am open to any suggestion on how to heat my place with a wood burning stove.

    Thanks,

    Chuck
     
  2. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would run single wall pipe from the stove to the triple wall elbow through the wall then single wall pipe up above the roof lije, then a spart arrester/cap on top. The pipe outside will not get hot enough to heat the outside wall as you will be using the stove in cold weather and the outside pipe will be exposed to the cold weather as will the exterior walls. You need the pipe to reach above the roof line to get a proper, good "draw" for the fire, otherwise, the stove will smoke you out every time you light a fire and it will most likely not hold a fire. I don't know what a T-box is. I have 3 wood burners in my house, all pipe going straight up.
     

  3. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    If you do run singelwall pipe any where inside or out make sure you have proper clearance and the seems of the pipe are so, that if you got a chimney fire the cresote wont run down the outside of the pipe and ignite also may want to check and see if insurance company will insure single wall pipe.
     
  4. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    We just got a new "Blaze King" Ultra, with gold door and dual fans (which are nice on sometimes, and very nice off sometimes). We got a double wall stainless steel chimeny, with 2-1/2" of insulation. The "stove pipe" from the stove to the chimney is non insulated double wall.

    For your own safety, get the best chimney you can.

    The Blaze King re-burns the gases and products of combustion with a catalytic re-burner. Because of the re-burner, it is 82.5% efficient, and has very little emissions.

    The automatic thermostat is a joy. "The house controls the wood stove.", Francis the neighbour said. You fill it full with wood and it will burn efficiently for up to 47 hours on "low".

    It's been a long time since we have had a thermostat on our wood stove.

    Very happy with our lovely new stove, very.

    Alex

    [​IMG]
    Flue Construction by Monty & Chuck ("Hire some help!", Nancy said), 2-1/2" Insulated SS Flue, 8" Diameter, "We" Added 6' More Feet of Flue To the Height Shown Here


    [​IMG]
    New Blaze King (two days old), These Tiles are 18" Square, So You Can Get An Idea Of the Size

    [​IMG]
    Double Wall non-insulated "stove pipe", Yes There are "Clearance-Reduction" Panels Sides and Rear, and the Logs Stay Cool.
     
  5. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    $600 is pretty good deal. I prefer lined blocks, your insurance co might as well - costs more of course. It's hard to do this any cheaper & still be safe/ comply with building codes/ keep insurance.

    You are running hot combustable gases through your living area & a dwelling people are sleeping in. How much do you want to scrimp on this? Seiously?

    Running the pipe straight up would be better. The pipe would also help heat your upstairs, rather than losing that heat & efficiency to the outdoors. When you run the pipe outdoors, it cools down rapidly, and all the tar & gunk cools out right there, causing problems with the metal. This is much worse with single pipe. You will rust out pretty quick. It's a balancing act to create a good vent system. A 'I gotta be cheap' system likely will run into problems - rust out, not let the fire burn right, coat with creosote, and so on.....

    Just how it is. Good luck, hope you find a solution that works for you.

    --->Paul
     
  6. headintodawoods

    headintodawoods Well-Known Member

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    So is single wall pipe ok for the inside? I found some double wall pipe at Home Depot for alot less than the stove place wanted has anyone used pipe from Home Depot?

    Paul, safety is of the utmost importance. I just wasn't sure if this guy was trying to get me because I really didn't know any better or what.

    Does anyone know how much clearance I would need if I ran double wall pipe up through my second floor area. My roof line is barn shaped not a standard triangle shape, so the walls upstairs would be closer than the down stairs wall.

    Alex Where did you get your pipe?


    Chuck
     
  7. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    Single wall pipe is ok for the inside just as long as you dont penetrate the cieling with it and youll have to stay away from combustibles 6" so this means your insulated pipe will have to be at least 6" below the cieling hieght or more. the insulated pipe will either have instuctions and clearance in with the pipe The pipe we installed from home depot wanted atleast 3" clearance to wood or combustibles and they include dry wall as a combustible.
     
  8. headintodawoods

    headintodawoods Well-Known Member

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    Silo,

    how did you cover the 3" area around the pipe? I have seen the Army/cabin style tents and they use about 1 sq ft of metal around the pipe to protect the canvas. Would something like that work?

    Chuck
     
  9. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah,& they burnt down all the time, & didn't provide much heat, untill they burnt down.Get the best chimney that you can afford!
     
  10. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    the company sells a sheetmetal piece that has a hole cut in it the same size of the pipe you install. they call this a fire stop this is for applications not seen like in an attic and they recommend you use one every 8' if in a chimney chase that is combustble like if you had to frame one out of wood. these also come in handy if you need to support the seems of the pipe if you cant find any just get some sheetmetal about 26 ga. and cut some by tracing around the new pipe and cutting it out. They do also make fancy ones for the cieling that adapts the singel wall pipe to the insulated pipe but these of course cost alot ours from home depot 5 years ago cost 45.00$ but it looks real nice and seals the cieling off really well.
     
  11. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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  12. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    Chuck,

    We got our "Sentinel" double wall SS, 2-1/2" insulated chimney at Home Hardware - lots of places have it.

    Our "EV" double wall (air filled) stove pipe we got from Blaze King (Walla Walla, WA in the States, Penticton, in Canada). You can use single wall, as long as you keep 18" to combustibles (verify with manufacture).

    The base of our SS chimney drops down thru our second floor with a "floor support", it will hold up to 40' of chimney. Above the floor is a protector piece about 24 x 24, and about 12" high. Our chimney goes up and extends about 2' above our peak. We put a "brace kit" up about 2/3 of the height above the roof for extra support - wind protection.

    Get the best - if you think back after a problem, then you will be happy.

    Good luck.

    Alex
     
  13. goggleye57

    goggleye57 Active Member

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    What about your homeowners insurance? I don't know what kind of a fire rating area you are in but we really had to scramble to find a homeowner's policy with a wood stove. You are going to have to keep them happy if you want them to cover your home. We had to put quite a bit of safety into our installation to get them to cover us. You might check with your agent. ( I hate the insurance industry :mad: Charge you a bunch them give you grief when you actually have to use it) But thats the nature of the beast :no: