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Discussion Starter #1
I went to a several of wood stove dealers, and learned that it would cost me $800-$900 to buy the parts for the chimney, and $1500-$2500 for the stove.

Then I went and saw what they have at HomeDepot.com. The chimney is $450, and the stove (the Englander 30-NC, which seems to be highly regarded) is only $900.

This seems too good to be true, and I'm worried that I'm buying garbage if I go this route.

Is a chimey pipe a chimney pipe, or are the ones that all of the dealers sell really superior? Or do the dealers just have a much larger markup, and I'm a sucker if I buy from them?

What do you guys think?
 

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Several years ago I had two wood-burning heaters installed. One was a fancy pants $1200.00 one and the other a Tractor Supply "cheapie". The only difference I noticed was the expensive one would heat for a longer period of time on a fill. But they both performed the same as far as quality and longevity. I actually preferred the Tractor Supply one as the top got hot enough to keep water warm for tea or soup simmering.

As far as the chimney, as long as you get the triple wall kind to go through the ceiling and roof, I don't think it matters whether one costs more than the other. I really doubt there is that much difference.
 

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Several years ago I had two wood-burning heaters installed. One was a fancy pants $1200.00 one and the other a Tractor Supply "cheapie". The only difference I noticed was the expensive one would heat for a longer period of time on a fill. But they both performed the same as far as quality and longevity. I actually preferred the Tractor Supply one as the top got hot enough to keep water warm for tea or soup simmering.

As far as the chimney, as long as you get the triple wall kind to go through the ceiling and roof, I don't think it matters whether one costs more than the other. I really doubt there is that much difference.
This and if you can make sure you have 3 foot clearance from all walls.

I had one Cheap Cast Iron Heater I liked but it would get very hot.

Here is a Picture of it with TV setting on it.


big rockpile
 

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Our woodstove was $129 new. It's a simple steel box.
Chimney a few hundred more - multi-wall as appropriate, eight years and still going strong. About 20' of pipe.
I built a stone shroud around the wood stove so the heat stores in that. It is tied into our house which is also masonry. Good hot burn in the early part of the day and the house doesn't over heat but stays warm through the night.
Wood heat can be very cheap. Or very expensive. As you want.
Just be safe. It requires a bit more attention.
 

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I picked up one of those a a yard sale... It's a DutchWest stove.... Mine's been really great, especially since I only gave $100 for mine and it looks to be in better condition than that one...

They heat up really fast, but they just don't quite hold enough wood for a full night even when burning with the combustor (It's a catalytic stove.) I use mine to supplement my ventless gas heaters on colder nights..
 

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The original pricing you were given is what code requires around here. No used can be installed. And if you want house insurance it needs to be inspected. I sleep well...
 

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Please be very careful you are not making an apples vs oranges comparison. The wood stove store may be selling very high quality stainless steel triple wall chimney pipe, whereas Home Depot may be selling cheaper double-wall galvanized pipe.

For sure, go with triple-wall pipe. I can go up to the second floor, 8 feet above the stove, and the pipe is only barely warm to the touch. That is so re-assuring! You have to remember that every chimney is it's own unique installation, and two houses side by side may have different chimney components depending on where the owner decides to place the stove.

BTW, I bought a nice used stove off of Craigslist for only 300$. It's performed flawlessly for a couple of seasons now. It replaced a small Dutch West stove like simi-steading's, but it had a very small fire box that would only accept 12" pieces if you expected them to lay flat. It was an incredibly clean burning stove with a catalyst, but was just too small for heating a whole cabin.
 

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The original pricing you were given is what code requires around here. No used can be installed. And if you want house insurance it needs to be inspected. I sleep well...
Do you mean no used stove pipe or no used wood stoves or both?
 

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Guess I'm the lucky one... I am able to get by with the really cheap single wall pipe... It plumbs directly right into the side of my chimney, and there's no walls around to worry about.. .plus that thin single wall pipe puts off one heck of a lotta heat...
 

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I can totally see having a hard time spending what some of these stoves cost. We are lucky in a way. We are just building the home so installing a new stove is actually saving the installation of a furnace of any kind or duct work. If we would have not been starting from scratch, no way would be able to have got the stove and pipe we got.
 

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Two things you Porteiro did not mention. Your area (climate and what kind of structure this is going in. Also how many square feet are you going to heat? We bought our first one from an individual who had it in his Mobile home. King was the brand name. It heated our 1200 sq ft home. We placed it so we could place a box fan in front of it at night and blow the heat thru the rest of the house down the hall. We just replaced it with a soapstone which if you are o a budget may not work for you but the burn time is longer so you do not have to get up at 3 AM to stoke the fire. When we installed the first one I had the blessing of an experienced carpenter to cut the hole the stove pipe went thru. Use triple wall pipe. Again you did not say what kind of structure you have. If I were doing this for the first time I would look for a chimney sweep that is reputable and ask for some direction. Hope this helps.
 

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We got an incredible Lopi off classified ad... I installed it and them we moved :(

We had an Englander... that thing could hold a fire overnight so we replaced it with a used Lopi
 

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I just picked up a great deal on a Wood Stove yesterday from Lowes here in Minnesota, apparently they have some left over from last winter and have clearanced out a few models. I found it online on lowes.com and searched for local stock, had to drive a ways to get it but definitely worth it as original price was $1050 and I got it for $195. Here is a link to the product page, all you need to do is check local stock and the price may change depending if they have it in stock near you. (I did notice they have a few in and around the Twin Cities metro area). http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10151&catalogId=10051&productId=3260223&cId=detail


As far as Piping, I have used the double wall pipe and single wall pipe before, with this installation I plan on using the cheap single wall pipe since I have plenty of clearance and triple wall collar where it goes through my vaulted ceiling. Cant beat the $6 price for each four foot section of pipe, plus you do get quite a bit of heat off of the pipe as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
In my state (Oregon), it is actually to install a non-EPA-certified wood stove. This makes most used stoves worthless to me, as I've decided to play by the rules.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I have found an answer to my original question -- it's the distance that the stove must be away from the wall.

For a corner installation, the economical Englander requires that its corners be 15" away from the wall. One comparable Lopi stove can be only 5" away from the corner.
 

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The stoves instructions list the clearance the stove has to be from bare walls. I put a big stove in my mobile home and it would have been in the middle of the room except I put sheets of Durarock cement board over the walls behind the stove. They are spaced 1 1/2 inches off the wall by screwing through the cement board and some of those old ceramic fence post insulators. I left a 3 inch gap at the bottom and top so air can circulate behind the board. The cement board gets almost too hot to touch on the stove side but the wood walls just get a bit warm. I am not worried about setting the place on fire.

I ran single wall pipe up close to the ceiling and then double wall through the roof. Be sure to get the heavy gauge single wall. I do keep the chimney clean because I don't want a chimney fire.

I bet if you looked at the Lopi there is a piece of sheet metal on the back that is spaced off the stove to block the heat so the clearance is less. Lopi are a very good quality stove but they are pricey.

Since you have to buy new, I would go with one of the EPA certified stoves. Don't get one with a catalytic burn. You will have to replace the catalytic unit every 3 or 4 years and they are expensive. The EPA certified stoves are more efficient so you will use less wood in a season, this results in more time for fishing.

You want a stove that will keep a fire overnight. This translates into an efficient stove with a big firebox. My stove keeps the place warm for 10 hours at -40 and 16 hours if the temp is over 0.

I have the Drolet HT2000. The firebox is about 3 1/2 cubic feet. You could get by with a smaller model like the Austral. I have seen them on sale for about $700.

http://www.fleetfarm.com/detail/drolet-austral-wood-stove-with-blower/0000000003075


a
 

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The specifications are usually worded as "distance from combustible surfaces" or something like that. This is why many people build a masonry wall behind the stove.
 
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