Wood Ash Question

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by SweetSarah, Dec 8, 2006.

  1. SweetSarah

    SweetSarah Well-Known Member

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    We are unfortunately stuck with a gas burning fireplace. However, my sister has a wood burning one which she uses often. I was thinking of asking for her ashes to put on my gardens. But she often uses those quick burning logs from convenience and grocery stores. Is there any difference in using that ash as opposed to pure real wood ash?
     
  2. SweetSarah

    SweetSarah Well-Known Member

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  3. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    I personally would be leary of using that ash in my garden. If it was simply a portion of the total ashes, then I would be less concerned. Look at one of the wrappers and see what the log is formulated from and that should give you some direction.
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    The actual material in them supposedly is OK. For example, E-Z Lite logs are made of 100% recycled cardboard and wax. That wax is usually a petroleum-derived paraffin product used for easy lighting but slow burning. Thus it would not be approved for organic farming due to zero tolerance. If that's the only reason for us to avoid using them, then we also don't want any paraffin candles around! Wax leaves no residue other than a bit of soot. What would remain from a firelog of that construction would be simply the same type of ashes as if it were cardboard.

    Martin

    Martin
     
  5. onecowenuf

    onecowenuf Member

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    I think it would be ok. The issue would be if they were binding just sawdust or if they were binding post consumer waste like newspaper or something. Post-consumer waste tends to contain nasty things like heavy metals that would remain in the ash and that you would want to avoid adding to your soil.

    Even if it was a formaldehyde glue for the binder that should all be gone if it is completely burned.

    One thing to keep in mind with wood ashes is they have a liming effect. 3 pounds of wood ashes is equal in liming effect to 2 pounds of Calcium Carbonate lime more or less. So too much wood ashes on your soil could affect your pH. Don't know what type of soil you have.