Wolf rescues in AZ?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Cygnet, Jun 8, 2006.

  1. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Gah!

    VERY large high-percentage wolf hybrid running loose w/ a smaller mutt buddy in my neighborhood. I was up at 3 AM chucking rocks at it to drive it off. I'm not in a position where I can shoot it; too many houses in too close to me these days.

    This thing is huuuuge -- my perimeter fence is 48" and I'd say it's at least 36 inches at the shoulder. It would make three of my seventy pound dobie-heeler cross guard dog!

    It's big, it's male, it's not neutered, it's eyeing my goats -- it was doing the predatory pace-around-the-pen-at-a-trot thing just like a wild wolf. It's gotta go!

    I'm going to set a live trap up this weekend. If I trap it live, I'm not inclined to kill it -- I'm a softey. But if I turn it over to animal control they'll likely put it down unless the owners show up. And I'm not inclined to risk the owner picking it up again because we'd be right back where we started; I have a strong suspicion who owns this beast -- there's a family in the neighborhood who likes to acquire very large, very aggressive dogs and then let them run loose. They've been cited repeatedly by animal control without apparent effect. If their dog disappears they just obtain another one.

    So, anyway, animal control not an option, shooting it is not an option. That leaves me wolf rescues. Anyone know any that will take a stray in Arizona? I honestly don't know for sure the idiots up the road own it; it's just a suspicion. Maybe somebody dumped it, I dunno.
     
  2. Unregistered

    Unregistered Well-Known Member

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    How do you know it is a high percentage wolf hybrid?
     

  3. Gideon

    Gideon Well-Known Member

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    Why take a chance that it will be turned loose on somebody else's livestock by the wolf rescue nuts. A .22 short doesn't make much noise and will end the threat permanently. I take no chances with potential predators-none.
     
  4. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm fairly knowledgeable about dogs.

    I suspect it's fairly high percentage because of the sheer enormous size, the coat (long and flowing, but not overlong), the gait (graceful, very athletic, very "catlike"), the head -- the eyes were very widely spaced, broad skull -- the tail set, the length of the body vs. the height, and the fact that I *didn't* realize how big it was until it was up next to my fence and I could judge height based on how close the withers were to the top of my fence. My fence is 48 inches high.

    My neighbor, who also saw it (going to work early -- he's in construction -- alsop said, "WOLF!") . It looked like a WOLF, not a dog.

    Not, I don't think, 100%. But a very high percentage of wolf genes.

    Leva

     
  5. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    Sorry there! But I don't think you are at all serious about this. These hybrids are dangerous when owned by idiots....just like other large canines with strong instincts to kill. If you are going to be mushy about it, you just have to take what you get.

    I am not a bit fussy about these things but then I value my stock, my neighbors and my dogs over some loose hybrid canine (or ANY loose dog!)of which there are far too many in this world already.

    Toss out something that will at least make it drunk...maybe then it will go home drunk and the twit who owns it will keep it in. Acepromazine works well and the tablets are tiny and easy to hide in weenies etc.

    If you do find a hybrid rescue they will have to be close to you..someone has to catch the creature...can you do that? Then call them??? It just goes on and on.

    LQ
     
  6. Unregistered

    Unregistered Well-Known Member

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    Just thought I would ask as I had a friend who had his 2 gsd's killed when someone thought they were wolves. Thought I might get an idea on how people could mistake a gsd for wolves.
    Thanks
     
  7. roughingit

    roughingit knitwit

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    Most rescues won't want a hybrid. Too much potential for contaminating the wolves they already have. Take your pick of SSS or animal control, there probably isn't much else you can do unless you know someone that wants a predatory and potentially unsocialized presumed wolf-dog...
     
  8. emulkahi1

    emulkahi1 Well-Known Member

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    Cygnet--

    Here is a link to a wolfdog rescue in Surprise, AZ. Hopefully, they can give you some information about how best to deal with your situation there. Good luck!

    http://www.wherewolvesrescue.tk

    Erin
     
  9. Nyx

    Nyx Misplaced Appalachian

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    That link didn't work for me, so if anyone else is also having issues with it here's an alternate http://www.wolfcountry.com/Where_Wolves_Rescue/ .

    We've a wolf-mix dog - a stray we took in when down visiting my family. Vet and dog trainer (trainer owns a group of wolf-mixes also) said he was around 7-12 months old then and very unsocialized. Going on three years old now (yay...the pushy, terrible twos...), 30" at the shoulder and 108 pounds last weighing, and he's a sweetheart with family. Downsides are that he's a fear-dominant guy who has to be reminded not to be mouthy on people, fearful of strangers, and wants to stalk smaller animals (discouraged with a sharp "HEY!...be good, you." when he starts fixating on something).

    Most wolf rescues won't take mixes, and I haven't heard of any wolfdog rescue that releases them. On the contrary, the ones we were considering until he settled down with us had the best containment/fencing for them that I've ever seen, barring expensive zoos.
     
  10. Nyx

    Nyx Misplaced Appalachian

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    If the rescue or other things aren't an option, I would also recommend the Shoot, Shovel, and Shutup route. He's large, possibly hungry, definitly stalking your animals, is very likely to be aggressive around what he percieves to be his food, and towards children because of their small size, high-pitched voices, and general prey-appearance. Aim for vitals, and kill him as humanely as is safely possible - something I advocate for all animals, problem ones and food animals.
     
  11. Ole Man Legrand

    Ole Man Legrand Well-Known Member

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  12. Steph in MT

    Steph in MT Well-Known Member

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    Hello~
    First off thanks for being open to the option of contacting a rescue. I am active in wolfdog rescue and would be more than happy to forward your plea to my groups to see if there is anyone in AZ that can help you if you would like me to do so.
    Just let me know if it's okay.
    Take care~
    Steph