Wish I lived amongst the trees...

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by MTplainsman, Jan 13, 2018.

  1. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    19,615
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Ohio
    Trees are great, until one falls on your house or car.

    Have you considered planting shrubs along with your next round of trees? Shrubs can be fast growing and long lived windbreaks which will shelter slower growing trees. They are also essential for creating "edge environments" which attract more wildlife than a stand of only trees.

    I totally agree with contacting your state forestry or conservation department. They will know what species will do best in your area and may know where you can get baby trees (really seedlings or small saplings) for a reasonable price. Everybody wants to plant the largest tree money can buy for the immediate impact but most often the smaller trees are a better buy. Small trees usually have a more complete root system and recover from transplant shock years earlier. Once recovered they grow quickly and often grow faster than transplanted large trees. They also withstand years of drought or flood better than larger trees with smaller root systems.
     
  2. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

    Messages:
    19,852
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    Holler where I was going to build our house on our old place.

    009-2.jpg

    big rockpile
     
    MTplainsman likes this.

  3. Yvonne's hubby

    Yvonne's hubby Murphy was an optimist ;) Staff Member

    Messages:
    32,050
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Love them redbuds!
     
  4. Twp.Tom

    Twp.Tom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,800
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Location:
    Soderhogen,Sweden
    I feel for Ya Plainsman- tree's sure are beautiful*-Here's some tree porn from up North here in Sweden*
     

    Attached Files:

    PlayingInDirt, MTplainsman and RichNC like this.
  5. wdcutrsdaughter

    wdcutrsdaughter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    574
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2012
    Location:
    maine - zone 5b
    Plainsman I am sorry about your trees and wish you luck with the next batch.
    I too love trees and I lived in the city so I can relate to your longing, in some sense, I longed for them there. But there were some.
    I can also relate to the fact that they are healing, since now we've lived among many pine, fir, oak, maple, birch and definitely feel better.
    have you ever read "The Giving Tree" Shel Silverstein?
     
    MTplainsman likes this.
  6. CajunSunshine

    CajunSunshine Joie de vivre!

    Messages:
    2,502
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Location:
    North, sometimes South of Sane
    No, but I will! I took a peek at Silverstein's offerings on Amazon, read some of the reviews and will definitely load up on several of his books. Many of them are fifty year old classics that will make fine gifts!

    One description looks like a pretty good summary of his books: "...stretches the bounds of imagination and will be cherished by readers of all ages."


    .
     
  7. MTplainsman

    MTplainsman North of the Hi-Line

    Messages:
    1,096
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Location:
    North East, MT
    Yes, I have consider shrubs with the trees. I had Caraganas directly behind most of my new trees. I'm going to get rid of the old scruffy stuff and plant a fresh row of fast growing hedge or trees and then plant trees to the inside of all that.
     
    emdeengee likes this.
  8. wdcutrsdaughter

    wdcutrsdaughter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    574
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2012
    Location:
    maine - zone 5b
    Cajun - Shel Silverstein books are some of my nephew's favorites. There is a poem about a man with a beard so long he wears no clothes. "I wrap my hair around my bare and down the road I goes". :)
    If you have grandkids another great tree book is "A Tree Is Nice" By Janice May Udry. " A tree is nice even if you only have one tree". I love that line and that's what got me through city living
     
    MTplainsman and CajunSunshine like this.
  9. CajunSunshine

    CajunSunshine Joie de vivre!

    Messages:
    2,502
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Location:
    North, sometimes South of Sane
    Ha, because I qualify as a reluctant adult, my grandson will just hafta wait until I get through with them first, lol. I am absolutely smitten with this new-to-me author. Thanks for introducing him to me!


    .
     
    wdcutrsdaughter likes this.
  10. emdeengee

    emdeengee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,178
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    We have lived deep in the forest, on land with and surrounded by orchards and in the deciduous forests of the east where the autumn colours are so vivid and varied that they look fake. We now live in the boreal forest of the north where all the black spruce are one eco system.

    We have a lot of trees here in the Yukon - birch, poplar, willow, cotton wood and aspen as well as spruce, pine and fir . The cold is intense in winter and the wind never stops blowing. Perhaps you could get some trees that are native to Alaska and could stand the climate on the plains.

    This is a fascinating documentary about the way trees talk to each other. Of course everything that Dr. Suzuki does is excellent.

    http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/what-trees-talk-about
     
    MTplainsman and RichNC like this.
  11. sewtlm

    sewtlm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    656
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Location:
    SE Montana
    Trees in eastern MT have to be watered at least once a week for many years. Our bigger trees are just now rooting to water at 8 years out. They still get watered about every other week in the summer.
     
    MTplainsman likes this.
  12. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,190
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    Appalachian Foothills
    Every time I read this title, I keep thinking, but I can't see glorious sunrises and sunsets anymore due to the ancient oaks and other trees around me....and I hate the tree rats (squirrels) they harbor.
     
    MTplainsman likes this.
  13. keenataz

    keenataz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,939
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Location:
    Central British Columbia
    Surrounded by huge spruce out here. Used to have alot of pine, but the mountain pine beetle killed them all and now they are firewood. Can't imagine not living among trees.
     
    MTplainsman likes this.
  14. montysky

    montysky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    480
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2006
    Location:
    Montana
    We love it and to be 100 percent honest if it wasn't for the GGGreat grandparents ranching here we wont be able to ranch/farm here now things are going crazy. I am worried that everyday Bozeman goes more the way of Aspen and Park city a world that I don't fit in.

    I think you have the makings of a real nice man's cave, best of luck with the trees ... someday the grand kids will take about how grandpa planted them. hope you get a few of those bucks on your dinner table
     
    MTplainsman likes this.
  15. In The Woods

    In The Woods Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    312
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Location:
    NW Penna
    Interesting subject.

    I live in a heavily forested area. The view from my house is less than 1/4 mile in any direction. And the only reason I have that much is because I keep about 3 acres around the house mowed.

    At times I do get the feeling of being closed in I guess. But that has changed in the last couple years. I had been yearning for wide open spaces.

    A friend now lives in Wyoming and sends pictures regularly. It didn’t take me long to actually hate it without actually seeing it in person. Not a tree in sight and flat flat flat. He often talks about constant 30-40 mph winds. The wind alone would drive me insane!

    It’s all about where we have lived most of our lives and what we are used to. The same applies to friends who live in Louisana - I don’t know how they can take the heat and mostly the humidity. But they’ve lived there all their lives and are accustomed to it.

    So my lust for wide open spaces has been quelled by my friend in Wyoming. I still just have to visit him however - I have to see these wide open plains and feel the wind. 1 or 2 days will be enough I am sure.....

    So yes, I love where I live in the boonies amongst the trees and mountains. But I grew up with them and they have become a part of me.
     
    MTplainsman likes this.
  16. MTplainsman

    MTplainsman North of the Hi-Line

    Messages:
    1,096
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Location:
    North East, MT
    MY well failed at the place I planted the new trees for a whole hot summer, and they had to be on thier own... thats what apparantly finished them off. the Blue Spruce still survived though!... till those bucks shredded them.
     
  17. MTplainsman

    MTplainsman North of the Hi-Line

    Messages:
    1,096
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Location:
    North East, MT
    Oh ya, the sunsets on the plains can't be beat... no doubt in my mind!
     
  18. MTplainsman

    MTplainsman North of the Hi-Line

    Messages:
    1,096
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Location:
    North East, MT
    My family homesteaded here about 130 years ago, thus the reason I started out here and remain. From all that my family went through out here, I feel like I should stay and continue no matter what. I should never complain about where I am, lack of trees or not, cause I have it so much better then my family did!

    I have heard Bozeman refered to as Boz-Angeles, so I assume it is getting big, fast! I wouldn't want to live by any city, nor could I ever live inside one, but there is some great country out your way for sure!
     
  19. MTplainsman

    MTplainsman North of the Hi-Line

    Messages:
    1,096
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Location:
    North East, MT
    I agree, it has a lot to do with where you were raised. I long for trees, but in all actuality, I would feel suffocated before long inside a endless forest I could not see out of or escape within minutes. Just would like to have woods close by to escape into at any time.
     
  20. sewtlm

    sewtlm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    656
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Location:
    SE Montana
    We haul water to a cistern because a well is to expensive / deep. In the summer I haul about 3000 gal per week for garden, animals, trees and us.