Wire from house to electric pole....

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Jena, Sep 20, 2006.

  1. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    Sometimes you can just buy it from the electric company. Check their price against the stores. Our coop would sell it at cost, plus install it for whatever amount.

    Jena
     
  2. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    The whole shebang is called a "drop" or a "loop" depending on where you live. It includes the cable and the wires and perhaps the conduit with the rain excluding hood on the top.

    Make sure you (or your electrician) uses a large enough gauge electrical wire for the electrical load you have from appliances, etc., in your house.
     

  3. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Also dont be lured into buying aluminum cable by cheap price. It doesnt hold up nearly as well as copper. I am going to have to replace my ratty old aluminum with copper and its not going to be cheap.
     
  4. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

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    I have wired 2 places now using Aluminum. wire very heavy Ga. 00, 0 and 1 ga. The only thing that is really important about running Aluminum. is that you use the special gunk at the connections so no electrolysis takes place between the Aluminum, and Copper/Brass connections, when that is used I have not heard really bad things about using Aluminum. My friends just buried theirs in the ground and then came up next to the buildings with the wire in side of Plastic Pipe. And then went in to the main panel boxes.
     
  5. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What Hermit John said, but it does seem strange that you are having to pay for the lead in wire. That is usually furnished to your mast head. Sometimes they charge extra in our area if you want the cable buried.
     
  6. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    The correct name is Service Entrance Cable Do a google search and you will get more information
     
  7. TheBlueOne

    TheBlueOne Well-Known Member

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    Service Entrence Cable goes from the weatherhead down to the meter socket and is covered in the National Electric Code, Section 338. Tri-plex goes from the weatherhead out to the power provider and is much smaller cable. Tri-plex is available at Home Depot. Tri-plex is usually aluminum to keep the weight down, SE Cable is either copper or aluminum depending on the color of your money. When splicing or terminating aluminum conductors ALWAYS use de-ox paste.
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    My meter is at the pole! Therefore I am responsible from the pole to the house. If the meter was on the house the utility company would be responsible to the meter here in NC.
     
  9. Traci Ann

    Traci Ann Domestic Engineer

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    Finally got ahold of someone at the coop. They said Triplex is what I needed. Thank you all for your help. I will be back and needing help alot as I just have never wired before.

    Dh did crawl under our house last weekend and said foundation (old rock) looked good. Plumbing seemed fine. But the electric is a whole nother ball game. 3 boxes inside - 1 with screw in fuses and 2 flip kind. Wire of every imaginable kind and spilced all over!!
     
  10. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Yep, my meter and cutoff is out on pole. I had to not only provide the loop out on pole (everything from transformer to cut off box except the meter box, electric company provided the meter box) then had to run my own wire from cutoff box to the house fusebox. I got a "deal" on aluminum cable to come from box to house. Aluminum cable is very susceptable to corrosion not just at ends but all along its length. If you separate the hots and neutral into separate cables and run each in its own pvc conduit, you might get by. Otherwise those liking aluminum, tell me what you think after living with it 15 years. REally truly, use copper. Copper lasts a lifetime and replacing aluminum is going to cost much more in another 15 years. Course if you are just buying to resell quickly, aluminum is legal, and you can dump the timebomb off on whoever owns the place 15 years down the road.
     
  11. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Are you planning a 100 amp breaker box in the house? Or more? Are you getting aluminumn or copper? It will make a difference in how big your wire/ cable will be. The distance is important as well.

    --->Paul
     
  12. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    Traci Ann:

    with a good book, just about anyone can wire from the cut-off switch box (usually downstream of meter) through the panel and into the house. IMHO, if you are planning to wire upstream of the cut-off switch yourself, you are out of your ever-lovin' mind. I would assume the co-op would take the triplex you provide and install between their line to the meter, and to a cut-off switch. Even if they don't, pay someone, as these are hot and can kill you.

    HermitJohn:

    On another thread, TiogaCounty stated that neutral wires separated from their hot wire (i.e. - in a separate conduit) can get very hot. I don't know if that situation is the exactly the same as this one, but I am not sure that "getting by" and setting up a timebomb for the next owner is the best advice...
     
  13. Traci Ann

    Traci Ann Domestic Engineer

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    I'll need 95 feet from the meter on the pole to the breaker box. We went ahead w/ a 200 amp box. We were told the co op doesn't sell the wire we will need. So we are off to the home store to see what they have and get an idea of how much we will need.
     
  14. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    In my experience aluminum wiring with all three cables twisted together sets up electromagnetic fields that encourage corrosion wherever there is small nick in the insulation. Its a dang pain in rear to continually track down these problems above ground let alone below ground. The only way I see is to run the hots and neutral in separate conduit and prevent such. I cant see it being worth the effort though. Dont see why it would cause a problem, but then I have never tried it. In my mind if cable gets hot it is either too small of a gauge or there are corrosion problems thus effectively making it a smaller gauge.

    I am not telling people to set up a time bomb. I am saying using aluminum cable does set up a time bomb though it meets most electrical codes. If you read my post I am trying to direct people to doing the smart and long term most economical thing and use the appropriate copper cable. Sometimes its better to spend the money the first time and not do it the cheapest way possible.
     
  15. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    Well I certainly agree with you there. I guess the last sentence of the post in question was tongue-in-cheek, but it never hurts to clarify...