Winter time: Would my kitchen scraps make better rabbit food then compost food?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by r.h. in okla., Dec 22, 2005.

  1. My compost barrel is getting really full and since it is winter time now it is not heating up enough to break down into compost. So I'm wondering, since I have the wood stove a going all the time couldn't I just dehydrate my veg. scraps and then feed them to my rabbits? Just wondering what all they would eat? Would they eat dried potatoe peelings? Would they eat dried egg shells? Lots of calcium for them I would think.

    I am going to post this on the rabbit site too. Thanks for your advice or thoughts. RH. in Oklahoma.
     
  2. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    I think it's only close to Easter that you need to feed rabbits egg shells. :D
     

  3. Jack in VA

    Jack in VA Well-Known Member

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    Put your potato peelings in the woodstove and grind up your eggshells and put them in your garden where you plan on growing tomatoes. Don't feed your rabbits Iceberg lettuce.
     
  4. Why not feed rabbits iceberg lettuce? Now, I'm talking about dehydrating the kitchen scraps first before sending to the rabbits. Would iceberg lettuce still be a no-no?
     
  5. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Rabbits aren't as good as chickens at eating all kitchen scraps. In the winter, I make a worm composter in the garage. It's easier to got here to drop the kitchen scraps the chickens don't like. Then the worms become chicken food, I have worm compost for the garden.
     
  6. Well, as of right now I don't own any chickens to feed the scraps too and what few scraps that I have dehydrated since posting my question the rabbits don't seem too interested in. So if they are not going to eat them then why bother dehydrating them.

    So with that in mind, I think what I'll do is just start another compost barrel. Someone on another thread suggested just throwing them on my old garden spot and let nature do the rest. I've tried that before but I have a lot of black crows and various other birds that will eat them up and then fly away to poop somewhere else.

    Thanks everyone for your input/advice and tips.
     
  7. cindyc

    cindyc Well-Known Member

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    Iceberg letttuce and citus fruits are toxic to rabbits, like chocolate is toxic to dogs. It will eventually kill them.
     
  8. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't have rabbits, but can tell you I have read many many times that during the depression people raised rabbits in their backyards from scraps and grass. There was a very good article in Countryside about this. You figure that around the world people are raising chickens and rabbits with no monetary input--so can you. I'll look through some books I have (my latest is the Integral Urban House) and see what I come up with.

    Personally, I decide where the scraps will go to best use. I can produce far more garden compost by harvesting weeds, leaves and shredded paper products. I can't feed these to chickens or rabbits. Except for weeds, that is.

    So our edible scraps must go to animals to be of best value. Their output (bedding + manure) makes the best compost! Two for one! Lately I've been putting edible scraps that won't be of value to the chickens in the worm bin (leftover flour from baking, onion skins, egg shells) for the worms which will eventually feed the chickens. See?