Winter gardens...who grows one?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by kesoaps, Oct 16, 2006.

  1. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Wondering who continues to grow through the winter?

    I've wondered if I can restart some of my potatoes. DH decided the garden didn't look tidy enough (his sis from CA is coming for her first visit ever) and mowed what he considers 'the weed patch', so now I can't find my potatoes. Some are really small...can I pop them back into the ground and expect more potatoes? How about putting them in buckets (well insulated) and trying to get them to grow there?
     
  2. hillsidedigger

    hillsidedigger Well-Known Member

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    I work in the gardens thru the winter moving hundreds of trashcans of leaves and soil from the nearby woods to the garden areas and rebuilding ridges and beds, start bigtime planting again in mid-February,

    but can mostly only harvest certain root crops and greens between now and about May 1.
     

  3. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

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    Hey Guys;I am in southern CA.I just put in a lot of lettuce,10 varieties,broccoli,cabbage,B.sprouts,2 more Pea vars.,I'll be planting Creole and other garlics and Grey Shallots in Nov.
    My DePinto paste tomatoes are still going strong.My Corno di Toro,Relleno,and Ancho peppers are Finally turning red.Cool summer.Two other varieties of Tomatoes are still producing.I am probably going to plant another 12 vars. of lettuce.S.Chard and a couple of other things as well.No frost means 365 gardening days a year.I Love LA.-
     
  4. rwinsouthla

    rwinsouthla Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I grow one. It's the only time I can grow lettuce, spinach, cauliflower, broccoli, and strawberries. I also grow onions, shallots, etc. I also have sweet peas and snow peas. This is actually my favorite part of the growing season. It's neat to walk outside and pick your salad! Another neat thing is I still have zuchini, tomatos and cucumbers growing too so the salads are awesome this time of year. Plus, and someone else said this in another thread, we're the only people in america eating spinach right now.
     
  5. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    Potatoes, freshly harvested, go through a dormant period. Yes, you can grow new potato vines from your small recently harvested potatoes... but you have to wait and plant them later. They won't sprout right now.
     
  6. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Since I just moved here July and just got a chance to start garden for September (needed raised beds), as well as this being Alabama with the dead season being high summer, not winter, YES to 'winter' garden. Lettuce spinach carrots etc onions leeks broad (fava) beans peas which I can't grow in summer and sometimes not in spring here in raised bed #1. Might not get peas if frosts too early/when flowering but expect no frost problems from other crops, and broad beans in England were best planted now (of course they often didn't SPROUT until February and here I have 5" high plants!). Will continue similar plantings through winter to catch best time for plants not able to grow here summertime.
     
  7. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have corn ranging from 6" to 2' tall right now and Am waiting to plant Watermelons in Jan. And who know what else I will thr..ow in
     
  8. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden Well-Known Member

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    Well since Kesoaps is over here in NW WA like me winter gardening is a little different than you lucky folks in the south! :)

    I have some spinach and Kale in the garden right now. That's about it. They are doing well and have survived 3 frosts thus far, but they weren't really hard frosts. I'm thinking of rigging up a cold frame to get through the winter on some good greens. I'm wondering if they will sprout in zone 8 right now if they are in a cold frame?

    kids
     
  9. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    kesoaps - I can't help you way over there on the other side of the country, I can only tell you what we do.

    Labor day weekend, we prepare a bed with a lot of manure and plant spinach, lettuce and radishes. Put a cold frame over this, and we eat fresh until at least Christmastime. During the winter, we are always spreading manure out there as long as we can still take the tractor out on to the gardens and not get stuck. This won't get turned under until the spring.

    Sorry, I can't help you with the potato situation. Ours are all dug and in the root cellar. Hey, there's only one way to see if it will work, right?

    Oh, by the way, you have an interesting signature line :p
     
  10. zealot

    zealot Soli Deo Gloria

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    I grow a garden in the winter too. (Does that give you a hint about who I am, Zebraman?) Anyway, during the winter I grow brassicas and the like, for the most part.
     
  11. Randy Rooster

    Randy Rooster Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Winter is my favortie gardening season. I grow 3 types of mustards- my favorite is called tendergreens, garlic, green onions, collards, cabbage, broccolli, turnips, lettuces- rarely will the brassicas get cold enough here to hurt them too badly.