Winter Composting- What do you do with that goo in freezing weather?

Discussion in 'How-To Threads of the past' started by Sarah H., Oct 29, 2017.

  1. Sarah H.

    Sarah H. Member

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    Good Evening Everyone!

    In my experience the family just kept tiny composting buckets on the kitchen counter and then pitched it straight into the garden to roto-till and incorporate into the garden the following year.

    Is there a better way to go about this?
    Where are you storing your coffee grounds and banana peels all winter?
    I have an unfinished basement, does anyone use the heavy duty compost cyclers I have seen online indoors?

    Thanks!
     
  2. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    Storing and using compost tumblers is a just too much work for me....
    I just use a outside compost bin....the 4 pallet style.....
    Or an outside "Pile" works as well.
    Or just spread in garden.

    Just pitch scraps in when you have some......
    You can even store a couple of bags of leaves,... shredded work better,... to just dress the top of the pile.
    If it's working correctly it get hot and steams .....mine never do...but with start up again in the spring.
     
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  3. light rain

    light rain Well-Known Member

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    We have two tumbling composters, one in front of our house and one in back. While I might consider a worm composter in the basement I wouldn't want a tumbling one. I put in kitchen trimmings, coffee grounds and spent mushroom compost. Also thrown in grass clippings, cow and pig poop and leaves. Just bought the 2nd one a few weeks ago and am considering putting a little throw together greenhouse to heat it up a little bit for the next month. It is amazing the dark, rich compost one of these tumblers produce...
     
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  4. mzgarden

    mzgarden Well-Known Member

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    We have a wire cylinder staked in the garden - about a half length of cattle panel with the ends zip tied together and staked to keep it from tipping over. Year round, all garden clippings, kitchen scraps go there, along with layers of leaves, and some waste hay from the goats & chickens. In winter it stacks up, spring we unstake it, spread and rototill in. Some years we have a couple cylinders staked in different areas of the garden.
     
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  5. rininger85

    rininger85 Well-Known Member

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    we just boxed in a small area next to the chicken coop so when I clean the coop I just open the window and scoop out the coop and throw it in the compost pile. My wife keeps a gallon ice cream bucket under the kitchen sink that she puts stuff in until it either starts to smell too much that she doesn't want to open it indoors or until it gets full then we carry it out and dump it in the pile. It's not a huge pile yet, just been slowly adding to it for a couple years now... if I get time before it gets too much colder I need to go dig it out and put it in our raised beds in the garden so the garden is ready to go next year, but I'll probably run out of time and find myself digging it next spring instead.
     
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  6. Skandi

    Skandi Well-Known Member

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    We do two things, one is a "Normal" compost heap, you can add to it all winter, it won't do anything untill it thaws, but better than breeding flies in the kitchen. And I dig trenches in the veg garden, and slowly fill them over winter, I can only do that though because our soil doesn't freeze deeply or for weeks at a time, so I can still cover it up as I go.
     
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  7. Sarah H.

    Sarah H. Member

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    Does anyone have much experience with worm composters? What are the results?

    I question how quickly the worms compost the materials?

    My household is just my husband and I, so I can't imagine this would overwhelm the composter very quickly?
     
  8. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    THis is a great idea....Thanks for posting.
    My brother uses this method....places the roll in the garden about 4 ft high...1/2 a panel.....fills it.

    Get full start's the other one...tears down the first bin......and compost not done yet go into the bottom of the second bin.

    Contents of the first bin then spread right in that area.....
    Move the bin to another spot.....starts the process over.

    Sarah H.......
    Is there a reason you don't want to compost outside?
     
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  9. Clem

    Clem Realist

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    My garden is fenced in, and from last harvesting day up to planting day, I turn the chickens out in it. They do 3 things: clean up, dig for bugs and grubs, therefore both pest control and turning over the dirt, and turn everything they eat into fertilizer. So, I throw all of the sort of stuff you'd compost over the fence, and the chickens do it for me.

    In return for their hard work, I eat all their eggs, and on a cold, lonesome winter morning, I'll quite possibly take an older one, chosen at random, into the promised land.
     
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  10. Sarah H.

    Sarah H. Member

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    Oh I wouldn't mind it ordinarily, but since I am starting this late in the year I wasn't sure if there is a better way to go about it.
     
  11. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    Gottcha......
     
  12. rininger85

    rininger85 Well-Known Member

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    I've seen where people use 4 plastic totes... tote #1 you leave empty with no holes just to catch any worm juice that drops down so it doesn't go on the floor...set a second tote inside of it. Tote #2 Drill holes in the bottom, start filling the second tote up with compost, toss your compost worms in there. Once it is half full (to the point where when you stack another tote on it the bottom of the next tote will be sitting on the compost in the tote below) Tote #3 drill a bunch of holes in it, start filling it up. As the worms finish composting the lower tote they will travel up into the tote above it, tote #4 repeat... by the time your forth tote is full your second tote should be broke down and the worms should have moved in to the tote above it, so you can pull that tote and go use it for whatever, then move it back to the top... they say this composts much faster than traditional compost piles.

    example for sale on amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01NBG2Y9...t=&hvlocphy=9017194&hvtargid=pla-351474790715
     
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  13. MichaelZ

    MichaelZ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Kitchen scraps can be composted sooner by being mixed in with a lot of grass clippings, leaves, and some old compost - in 3 weeks they are nearly ready and there is no bad smell. Or you can compost later. In the winter we put them into a large chunk of leftover road culvert with a cover on top to keep the dogs out of it. It smells REALLY bad by spring, but once mixed into the regular compost pile it is fine.
     
  14. Sarah H.

    Sarah H. Member

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    I was looking at one just like this! :)

    I think I will test this out and see how it goes. I read up on quiet a few articles and I think this will be a bit of an adjustment getting used to but will be fun to monitor if I can keep those crawlers thriving. :)

    Thanks.
     
  15. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    Just a note......watch it pretty regular.....really stinks if they die....
    Just saying.
     
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  16. mosepijo

    mosepijo Well-Known Member

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    We started a worm bin a few years ago and love it! My husband took a 6’ Rubbermaid water trough and put in on top of straw bales and placed bales all around it. (For winter). We started with 2000 red wiggles. I cannot believe how fast they compost the food. Over the last 40 years we have tried so many Composting ways and this is by far the best way. No smell whatsoever. You can use about anything to start one. We just happened to have this sitting around. They are suppose to double in Numbers ever month or so. I have no idea how many there are. To tell you the truth, we don’t ever see them, but they must be there because whenever I go out to dump more waste, the previous waste is gone.