Winemaking

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by doc623, Mar 20, 2005.

  1. doc623

    doc623 Well-Known Member

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    Any wine makers here?
    If so would anyone - wine maker or not- know the mechanism of the clarifying agents such as bentonite. innisglass, and/or egg whites?
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. doc623

    doc623 Well-Known Member

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    That is mechanism of action or how do these work?
    Sorry about not being clear.
     

  3. silentcrow

    silentcrow Furry Without A Clue

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    I was reading a book from the library that mentioned isinglass. I really don't know much about wine making...I make brandy :)
     
  4. momofmany

    momofmany Dayenu farms

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    I am a beginning wine maker. So far, I just use time to clear my wines since I am not wild about chemicals :)
     
  5. Swampfoot

    Swampfoot Active Member

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    I am relatively new to winemaking myself although I have been making homebrew for about 14 years. I have never used fining (or clarifying) materials but your question got me curious.

    The closest thing I could find to an answer was from "The New Complete Joy Of HomeBrewing" by Charlie Papazian. In there he states that "The ingredients that are added in the brewing process to help clarification are called finings. These ingredients attract suspended matter by the use of their molecular electrical charge, in much the same way as a magnet works." Anyway, as they settle out they take the haze with them. Most of these things are dissolved into boiling water and then added to your beer or wine and allowed to settle for a couple of weeks.

    For what it is worth the haze won't hurt you and is probably even helpful because it is loaded with brewer's yeast and B vitamins. In any case if you wait long enough it will settle out. I work by the principle that the more things you add the more likely you are to spoil the final results.
     
  6. Stush

    Stush Well-Known Member

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    You don't have to use "chemicals" as a fining agent to clear a wine. Two fining agents that I use routinely are bentonite, nothing more than finely ground clay, and egg white. You can't get much simpler than that. These have been used for hundreds of years to clear wines.

    The replies that suggest that time is the best clearing agent are correct. Most wines will clear on their own given sufficient time. Although, red wines that have had egg white added generally turn out absolutely brilliant.

    The mechanism for any fining agent is based upon ionic charge. Some are cationic and others are anionic. The attract suspended sediments of the opposite charge and precipitate them out.
     
  7. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    If you want to make it really clear check out this site. For information purposes only of course.

    http://homedistiller.org/

    Pete