Window Shutters?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Oilpatch197, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    I am planning to build a little house, and debating, do I NEED window shutters?

    I've noticed that most of the newer houses have the fake ones, but wouldn't a funtionally working window shutter make the place more secure(lockable) and protect during storms?
     
  2. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    Do you need shutters? No. But I think they make alot of sense especially in areas prone to high, cold winds. I also think they look nice too.
     

  3. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    They would be more secure but LOTS more expensive. And if its a 2 story house, it would be a pain to open and close them. I think they are more useful in hurricane country
     
  4. praise4him

    praise4him Well-Known Member

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    they would help with the electric bill too. But like the other poster said, they could be really expensive.

    Blessings,
    Jennifer
     
  5. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    it would be cool to have automated shutters that closed at night. especially if they were a thermal shutters.
     
  6. RoseGarden

    RoseGarden Well-Known Member

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    If you decided you didn't have to have louvered shutters, you could make your own. I saw some in a magazine ad that were made of four boards positioned vertically, and the two center boards had cut-out designs in them, and were painted. Also saw some raised panel shutters like raised panel cabinet doors, which looked really nice.

    I am leaning toward the ones made of four boards with the cut-outs. I could do that myself with a scroll saw.
     
  7. tamsam

    tamsam Well-Known Member

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    Shutters were more or less stopped being used so much when storm windows became popular. They were used to stop wind from hitting the windows but storm windows work better. In fla we had shutters to cover the windows when a hurricane came. Those palm thongs off the palm trees were like missles. Good luck with your designs Tamsam
     
  8. Txsteader

    Txsteader Well-Known Member

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    To answer your question, yes. Most of the older homes on Galveston Island, for example, have wooden, louvered shutters that have been used during hurricanes. Sad, many who are renovating some older home are doing away with them, and opting for the new, automatic roll-down (expensive!) storm shutters.

    For years, we've just put up plywood over the windows for hurricane protection. But as we get older, it's much more difficult to manhandle a sheet of plywood up to second-story windows. We just finished installing new hardi-panel siding and DH is planning to build wooden shutters similar to what RoseGarden described, that will be permantly installed. It'll be so much easier (even I could do it!) to simply close and lock the shutters.

    As to security, I'm not sure what kind of lock you'd use to prevent them from being opened, but they would at least slow an intruder from making entry.
     
  9. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    I'm a firm believer in shutters, working shutters, but of a different kind than most are aware of.

    A decade or so ago I learned about rolling shutters for security, storm damage prevention, and somewhat for energy savings. Think of them as having interlocking slats similar to tambour doors or roll top desks.

    The slat samples I have from this company http://www.rollupshutter.com/ give options as to size, material, and whether foam filled or hollow.

    Homes can be retrofitted or the shutters can be built in when the home is constructed. They can be electrically automated or opened from the inside manually.

    When and if I ever build a new home it will be outfitted with them on a timer device to open and shut them every day. That way no one will be able to tell if one is home or away.

    Drawbacks--cost, not cheap by any means, but neither is one burglary or the damage to windows from a storm. Depending upon the shutters one gets they might also exclude almost 100% of the available daylight. Some can be left ajar to admit light and air through perforations where slats connect.
     
  10. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

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    In an Italian B&B I saw a floor to ceiling "shutter" made from wood planks that operated on tracks, like a barn door. It was a real antique, but kept the bedroom very dark and cool.
     
  11. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    I like it, I am thinking of windows with shutters on them, and a skylight, so I can change the feel of the room from light in from the windows to only from the ceiling, I like it.
     
  12. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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  13. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think it would be super for security, but remember you'd need to be able to open your windows inside, to secure shutters. i think they would not be expensive, if you make them, and get the right hinges.
     
  14. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    Kitchen window, note lock


    [​IMG]
    The large windows in the background have a different design, the middle swings down


    [​IMG]
    All shutters on our cabin are built like this upper floor guest room shutter, 1 x 4 Pine, screwed together

    [​IMG]
    The outhouse, shown here (and shop -- not shown) shutters are different, still doors and windows have locking shutters. Again, not hard to get into, but a deterrent, a slow-down measure.

    Our idea is to try to keep the glass from being broken. If someone wanted to get in it would be easy enough to break the locks, even though they are big locks.

    ALL doors and windows are shuttered and locked when we leave for more than a few days.

    Alex
     
  15. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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