Will this work?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by boxwoods, Oct 22, 2005.

  1. boxwoods

    boxwoods Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't recommend it. Walls need support and 4x4's nailed on each other is not good support. It would fold like an accordian. You need verticals to support the roof and wall.
     
  2. Virg

    Virg Active Member

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    Of course it'll work. Watch out for weak foundations, out of squareness, hot sun expossure causing uneven drying and warping, mouse gaps, air infiltration, and if softwood, boring bees. Oh and building it too small. ;)
     

  3. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It will work just fine. As mentioned, the biggest problem with a shop is building it too small. Wood is not a real good insulator, but if it doesn't work just fir out the walls and add insulation inside. He might want to add sheer straps to the corners as that will provide a lot of strength in winds.
     
  4. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    yes it'll work. There was an article back in the early 80's in MEN where someone did it with economy 2x4's. They build like a 20' by 24' cabin.
     
  5. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It will work. A local man built a house out of stacked 4x4s about 30 years ago, and it is still looking good. He never put any finish on the outside which makes it appear very rustic. I don't know what he done to the inside.
     
  6. cchapman84

    cchapman84 Well-Known Member

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    If the 4x4's are long enough to go the entire length of one wall, then do the corners like you would for a log cabin. That should make the wall very structurally stable. Just make sure that the wall is attached to the foundation really well. I would think it would work similar to a log cabin, just with smaller logs.
     
  7. shaycool

    shaycool Well-Known Member

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  8. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    My question was about using stacked 4x4's, sawed on our mill from logging leftovers that are on the same property.
     
  9. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think that was understood? Stacking 2x4s would be about the same thing, but less difficult to nail together.

    Most old wooden grain elevators were made by stacking 2x12s or so for a ways, then 2x10s, then 2x8s, and so on. You understnd, the 2 inch dimention is the height......

    So it can be done.

    If these are short pieces and stacked, the wall will not be so stable unless it is very well nailed to the row below; and 4x4 is kinda hard to get nails through. Screws or Lagbolts cost more & more time to install... So, it would be an expensive way to go.

    If these are long pieces and he is basically building a log cabin with full-length 4x4s lapped at the ends, then it will be stable for a modest length building - or with 'T' walls lapped in it to provide lateral strength can be very long building. However, if he is getting wood that long, it is a poor use of useable lumber.....

    4x4 will not draw tight to each other, and he will have a hard time sealing the cracks - will need siding, and the cost keeps mounting....

    Now, if he were planning on using 2x4 or 2x6 & stacking that, flat side down, then the seams end up more stable, easier to nail, easier to bend the wood together into a solid plane........

    All in all, it can be done, but 4x4 seems a hard way to go, either in cost or value?

    --->Paul